Collector’s Choice: Joe Kozlowski


http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/joe-kozlowski.html

 

“A pow wow is a gathering of people, a prayer and a celebration. It is about color and motion and spirituality. From a series of images taken at the Wa:k Pow Wow on the Tohono O’odham reservation near Tucson, AZ.”

Joe Kozlowski

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Native American:  ” The People of the American Southwest, their art, architecture and beauty:   When I visited friends in the east, one of them mentioned that he’s seen a movie about a Native American law enforcement officer on a reservation and asked me if there really were sacred mountains. I told he that there were. Then he asked if I knew which ones. I said  ‘All of them. Where ever we find our feet, that is the holy land.” 

Joe Kozlowski

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Click on thumbnails to enlarge

About Joe Kozlowski

Tucson, AZ –
I started shooting seriously in the 1960’s as a freelance photographer in San Francisco. Then I stopped shooting seriously and started shooting for myself.

We always hope other people like what we do but, either way, it seems we keep doing it … doing what we do is not really a choice.

For what it’s worth, I was born in Upstate New York. I was schooled at Syracuse University and Shimer College but I don’t think my schooling got in the way of my education. I’ve lived and worked in Chicago, San Francisco, Cleveland, Grand Rapids (MI), The Poconos and the Metropolitan NY areas. My father was a portrait artist and art teacher (you can find his bio listed on Wikipedia). I’ve been involved in all aspects of photography for more than 40 years and I’ve won national awards for advertising design and art direction during my corporate incarnation. I am currently involved exclusively in the production and sale my photographic prints.

 

Professional Accomplishments:

One-man show: 
Fulton-Hayden Memorial Art Gallery at the Amerind Museum, Dragoon, AZ, May 1 – Dec 31, 2012 
I’m extremely proud that twenty four of my prints are now part of the museum’s permanent collection.
One-man show: 
Porter Hall Gallery at the Tucson Botanical Gardens, Tucson, AZ, Jan 18 – Feb 17, 2014

Principal photographer for ‘The Amerind at 75’, an illustrated history of the Amerind Foundation and Museum in Dragoon, AZ. Published in 2012 by the Amerind Foundation; available through the museum gift shop at http://amerind.org .

All of my work is ©2003-2016, Joe Kozlowski -or- ©2009-2016 Kworks Publishing LLC, a publishing company of which I am sole owner. All rights reserved.
I started shooting seriously in the 1960’s as a freelance photographer in San Francisco. Then I stopped shooting seriously and started shooting for myself.

We always hope other people like what we do but, either way, it seems we keep doing it … doing what we do is not really a choice.

Click on thumbnails to enlarge.

 

2014 Botanical Gardens Show

 

Several of my favorite pieces from my recent one-man show at the Tucson Botanical Gardens’ Porter Hall Gallery. This series of prints were made specifically for this show at the Tucson Botanical Gardens, January 18 to February 17, 2014. Twenty large prints on 20″ x 24″ were framed for display on the gallery walls. The challenge in preparing the show was to provide works that were appropriate to the themes of the Botanical Gardens and the Amerind Museum, who sponsored the show, while remaining true to the artisans you produced these artifacts. All of the images for the Tucson Botanical Gardens show were signed by the photographer. No other signed prints of these images will be made. Images sold through Fine Art American are unsigned and, therefore, more affordable.

 

 

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Sky House, Street scene at Acoma Pueblo, New Mexico. Tucson, AZ.

 

Click on thumbnails to enlarge. Top right:  Mission San Xavier del Bac, southwest of Tucson, AZ on the Tohono O’Odham reservation. Named in 1692 by Padre Eusebio Kino for a pioneering Christian missionary and co-founder of the Society of Jesus (Jesuit Order), the Mission is also known as the “place where the water appears,” as there were once natural springs in the area.

The current church dates from the late 1700’s, when Southern Arizona was part of New Spain. In 1783, Franciscan missionary Fr. Juan Bautista Velderrain was able to begin construction on the present structure using money borrowed from a Sonoran rancher. He hired an architect, Ignacio Gaona, and a large workforce of O’odham to create the present church.

Following Mexican independence in 1821, San Xavier became part of Mexico. The last resident Franciscan of the 19th Century departed in 1837. With the Gadsden Purchase of 1854, the Mission joined the United States. In 1859 San Xavier became part of the Diocese of Santa Fe. In 1866 Tucson became an incipient diocese and regular services were held at the Mission once again. Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet opened a school at the Mission in 1872. Franciscan Sisters of Christian Charity now teach at the school and reside in the convent.  This series of images was taken at the Wa:k Pow Wow on the Tohono O’odham reservation near Tucson, AZ.

 

Abstract Street Photographs

 

 

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