Collector’s Choice: Kirby Sattler


http://www.sattlerartprint.com/© reserved by the artist. No image may be reproduced or altered in any form without express permission of Kirby Sattler.

 

 

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http://www.sattlerartprint.com/© reserved by the artist. No image may be reproduced or altered in any form without express permission of Kirby Sattler.

http://www.sattlerartprint.com/index.html

 

image

 

http://www.sattlerartprint.com/© reserved by the artist. No image may be reproduced or altered in any form without express permission of Kirby Sattler.

Kirby Sattler, Studio El Otro Lado
My paintings are interpretations based upon the nomadic tribes of the 19th century American Plains. The subjects are a variety of visual references and my imagination. I am not a historian, nor an ethnologist. Being of non-native blood, without personal history, it would be presumptuous to portray the subject I paint from any other view than as an artist with an innate interest in the world’s indigenous cultures.

 

I purposely do not denote a tribal affiliation to the majority of my subjects, rather, I attempt to give the paintings an authentic appearance, provoke interest, satisfy my audience’s sensibilities of the subject without the constraints of having to adhere to historical accuracy.

 

My work is fueled by an inherent interest in the Indigenous Peoples of the Earth. The current images evolve from the history, ceremony, mythology, and spirituality of the Native American. The ultra-detailed interpretations examine the inseparable relationship between the Indian and his natural world, reflecting a culture that had no hard line between the sacred and the mundane.

 

Each painting functions on the premise that all natural phenomena have souls independent of their physical beings. Under such a belief, the wearing of sacred objects were a source of spiritual power. Any object- a stone, a plait of sweet grass, a part of an animal, the wing of a bird- could contain the essence of the metaphysical qualities identified to the objects and desired by the Native American. This acquisition of “Medicine”, or spiritual power, was central to the lives of the Indian. It provided the conduit to the unseen forces of the universe which predominated their lives.

I attempt to give the viewer of my work a sense of what these sacred objects meant to the wearer; when combined with the proper ritual or prayer there would be a transference of identity. More than just aesthetic adornment, it was an outward manifestation of their identity and their inter-relatedness with their natural and spiritual world.

The methodology of my style involves the painstaking layering of transparent washes over multiple underpaintings. This technique results in canvases that are detailed in defined textures and surfaces. With the deliberate precision given to each work, I produce a very limited number of paintings each year.

With the technological revolution of the digital printing industry and the advent of high quality, archival inks, the “giclée” is able to faithfully reproduce the details, tonality, and subtle nuances of the original work. These limited edition prints, available on both canvas and watercolor paper, have made the ownership of a Sattler work of art more affordable and accessible to the collector.

 

 

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http://www.sattlerartprint.com/© reserved by the artist. No image may be reproduced or altered in any form without express permission of Kirby Sattler.

I would like like to give sincere thanks to Kirby Sattler for sharing his art works with KIRSTEINFINEART in today’s art feature.

Call to action: For more informative inspiring features like today’s feature article, subscribe to KIRSTEINFINEART by going to the bottom of this page, clicking on the subscribe button and entering your name and email. Thanks so much for your generous support of this new blog featuring some of the very best contemporary artist working today throughout the world.K

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