Collector’s Choice: Tony Saladino


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http://prosites-saladino.homestead.com/

I Enjoy the risk taking aspect of doing varied themes, and shifting from medium to medium. While I consider many of my pieces to be personal I am, nevertheless, concerned that the viewer sees images that are universal enough to compel him or her to keep looking at the work.dd text.

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When we create a new building we don’t try to make it look like something else. It doesn’t stand for something else. An architect tries to make a place that is beautiful and that has utility. It can just provide shelter and be a meeting place. But it can be something more. It can be a beautiful place seen from outside and a comforting womb to those who work or meet there. So potential is a cogent part of this vessel.

 

 

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Such is the painting, being purely personal yet striving to have a universal appeal. My struggle is with my place in art and the question, “Do I have a place?” This conceit relates to me and to others as they struggle to understand what is valid in art. So much of the tension between beauty and decoration, the ancient objective and now, content and idea, seems inexorable. If I have just copied nature verbatim there is less of me and more a mirroring of what I think I see. If I want to convey ideas then the piece has to communicate on a scale that a viewer can understand. But this can destroy the opportunity for creating beauty. Thus the dilemma. What is a painting?

 

 

 

 

Those Fibonacci numbers in the vertical strip are a grounding consideration of the elegance of our universe and how things work in nature versus our minds. The two faces(of me) talk about the two poles of my struggle to find what is painting about for me. The dichotomy between thinking and acting, delineating and suggesting is just a glimpse into one artist’s thoughts.

 

 

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Tony Saladino was born in New Orleans. His BS degree is from LSU in New Orleans. His work is in the collections of the National Museum of Fine Arts, Hanoi, University of Wisconsin – Parkside, University of Dallas, Wichita Falls Museum, Museum of International Art, Bahia, Brazil, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana, Museum of Art and Archaeology, University of Missouri,and Parkersburg Art Center – Parkersburg, West Virginia.

He is listed in Who’s Who in American Art, and Who’s Who in the South and Southwest.

He has taught at The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, and Oxbow Summer School of Art, Michigan.

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