Collector’s Choice: Sigal Ron


 

IMG_1459

 

Sigal Ron

“I see myself as an abstract painter who enjoys freedom of expression.
However, we are all like ‘ swallows sitting on the wire of tradition,’ so from time to time I sin by creating objective art for feeling a communication with a greater public.  I adore every manifestation of visual art and enjoy crossing over and going back with the passion of a child who has gotten a new toy. I am grateful for every moment I can paint.”

Written by Zichron Jaacov Israel

 

 

Click thumbnails to enlarge

Sigal Ron is a painter who walks the fine line between completely non-objective painting and figurative painting with equal ease and grace. She  commands both sides of that artistic differentiation with prowess and inevitability.  Her non-objective paintings rush at us with volumes of hurtling textures, colors and glimmering light. Her figurative works walk with prowess all the way from realistic representation through graphic depiction to sighs of abbreviated yet essential abstractions. Her painterly touch is comprised of deft command, searing insight and relentlessly well timed orchestration. Bravo Sigal Ron! My hat is off to you!

Jan Kirstein

 

IMG_1456

 

 

 

Recent Exhibitions:

“GilArte” Gallery —Zichron Jaacov 2011

“Gam Gallery”—Tel Aviv 2011

“Gebo” Gallery—Tel Aviv 2012

International Exhibition of Art –Matera- Italy 2015

2nd International Bienalle of Art in Palermo 2014

4 International Abstract exhibition in Moscow 2015

2015 – Moscow “Gold collection of Abstract

Bienalle of Drawing Osten Museum – Skopje 2016

Museo Palazzo Farnese-International Exhibitin of Contemporary Art Juni 2016

Art for Peace- Museo Palazzo Farnese Ortona. Italy 2016

Gallery of Contemporary Art-Kazan-Russia

Juni 2016

Poligious Issues-Schiedam-Netherlands 2017

 

 

IMG_1465

 

 

 

 

IMG_1444

 

 

IMG_1439.PNG

 

 

Advertisements

“Imagination: The Creative Force of Life”


IMG_1390

Imagination: The Spirit of Sophia held “ The Creative Force of Life” at the Women’s Foundation’s Hopscotch House in Prospect, Kentucky today, Earth Day, April 22. Artist Joan Zehnder was our guide today as we wrote and made art about what we each individually have to offer the world. We then combined our writing and art in groups to create new worlds. What a meaningful, enriching, empowering and exhilarating experience. And what fun too! Perfect for a rainy Earth Day…..

 

 

Top left: Imagination participant Andria Creighton  contemplates her group’s creation. Top right: Going for a three-d effect here in this Imagination group effort. Bottom: Some thoughts of a participant.  2nd right:  Director and founder of Spirit of Sophia Dana Sue Walker writing and reflecting on her group’s New World Imagination group art.

 

 

Top left:  This is the lovely sitting room in the Hopscotch house provided by the Woman’s Foundation of Louisville, founded by Sally Bingham for the enrichment, advancement and enlightenment of women throughout the country. Top right: Another group contemplates their group creation. Bottom right: No matter which direction you look at it, this piece’s rich organic structure enhances the many gifts of all the women in this group.

 

Another Imagination group’s creative effort.

The entire Imagination experience was a high point of the week and a perfect way to celebrate Earth  Day, all enthusiastic participant agreed.

Seas of the Moon by Painter Sandy Miller Sasso


 

THE RECENT WORK OF SANDY SASSO

IMG_1308

The paintings and drawings of Sandy Sasso reign in the forces of nature to tell a story of mysterious talismans, presenting a reality woven from metaphoric symbolism and imagination. The results form an astute observation of a current collective consciousness and state of mind of our world today.

Jan Kirstein

 

“I am still haunted by the names of the seas of the moon… Sea of Crisis, Sea of Rains, Sea of Tranquility, Sea of Cold…. they sum up my response to the atmosphere of fragility and uncertainty that permeates the world now. I ordered a 3-D moon the size of a tennis ball that I suspend in still life set ups of illuminated objects from the woods around our house.”

Sandy Miller Sasso

 

 

5FA30E58-1617-4293-8FA8-7CCD8F848AC3-406-000000540786C8A3

Sea of Crisis II
22x5inches, charcoal/conte on paper, 2016

 

EC145F14-CD4F-43DE-8182-F4B06FB51D76-406-00000053F9EF88FA

Sea of Rains
22x5inches, charcoal, conte on paper, 2016
This drawing is currently in Ways of Seeing, a traveling exhibit organized by the Kentucky Arts Council. Sites are Hindman; Richmond; Williamsburg, Somerset, and Madisonville.

 

 

D23FAFBB-979E-4EBB-AD55-0C72823DB0EC-406-0000005400A6D36E

Beech Leaves
22 . 4.5 inches,charcoal and conte on paper, 2015
Private collection

 

“I have been working on a series of paintings and drawings united by the theme of the mares, or seas of the moon. Several of these paintings were on exhibit in Paducah, KY; at the Legacy exhibit of past and present art teachers at the Paducah School of Art and Design, and in Different Times Different Places, a group show at the Ruth Baggett Gallery. The entire body of work has just been shown at the Murray Art Guild in March, 2017 in Sea of Crisis, a solo show.”

 

Click thumbnails to enlarge

 

 

Artist Sandy Sasso lives with her husband, artist Paul Sasso in a lovely home they designed and built, surrounded by their own splendidly created gardens in Western Kentucky. Their daughter, now grown is Maggie Sasso, also an artist.

Sandy has also taught as a high school visual arts teacher in Murray Kentucky, and most recently taught a painting workshop at Arrowmont School of Art and Craft in Gatlinburg, TN in early November, 2016.

“It was really great to teach again, and the students and the facilities at Arrowmont were all exceptional,” she says. “The horrible fire happened two weeks after I was there. Though three buildings on campus were lost the studio/lab buildings are intact and all classes are on schedule for 2017. ”

 

 

To see more art works by Sandy Miller Sasso, visit her artist website at www.sandymillersasso.com

 

 

Prayers for the People of Syria


Requiem for Syria

Tonight I pray that all of your families will find love, peace, joy and justice in their lives despite the many tragic losses suffered in the war torn country. Of Syria.  With great gratitude, I ask for the emanation of abundant blessings to enfold and comfort all of your families within this ever changing Life on Earth.

I give thanks for the lives of all who have passed into the arms and heart of Glory on High. May the angels of heaven wrap you in their wings of love and solace on these most holy nights of faithful vision and may the bounty of The Universe’s love and protection provide a flame of eternal hope throughout this time of sorrow and darkness for your blessed families.

Amen

Prayer by Janis Kirstein, U.S.A.

 

To enlarge these paintings please click on the thumbnails.

IMG_1273

Paintings to Honor the Sojourn of the Syrian Refugees April 7, 2017

I have created these paintings to honor those who have suffered loss of life, home or loved ones through the egregious misfortune of war in Syria.

The first two paintings present my hope and vision for all victims of this deadly war exhuming the Syrian countryside. The next four paintings reveal the fire and destruction endured by the exodus of people from Syria and celebrate the spirit of all who have survived and persevered throughout all of their many horrific challenges.

These paintings are mixed media on masonite blocks. Each painting is 8″ x 10.”

 


Three years ago, I tried to raise awareness of the atrocities of chemical warfare in Syria of the Assad regime on his own people. At that time I attempted to raise money through Hatchfund so I could create these works on a large scale.

I want to thank all who contributed and donated money to this cause that I started called “”Sojourn Empathies” to raise awareness of the refugees from war torn countries and their life experiences, specifically of the victims of Syrian women and children killed by chemical attacks in Syria by the Assad regime. Unfortunately I was not able to raise enough money for larger works and traveling exhibitions, but I was able to paint these small works as a testimony to the empathy of the American people.

At that this time three years ago, I received word of the use of chemical weapons used by the Assad regime on his own people including women and small children.  I also accessed the tangible evidence of many extremely graphic photographs of chemical war victims by the Assad government in Syria including women, and very small children, and the dozens of body bags that lined cold cement floors in basement bunkers as a result of this horrid brutality. These photos were all marked with the copyright notices of the United States Marines.

After seeing these photographs, I was inspired to raise the awareness of the American people of these atrocities occurring in Syria.

Though I was never able to raise the money for creating these larger art works, I still hold the suffering of the Syrians in my heart and mind, especially with the most recent occurrence of chemical weapons used in Syria by Assad.
Today I would like to share these images with you that express my empathy for the people of Syria at this time and the perilous journey of both the survivors as well as those who have passed to a realm of peace and glory.
Now after three years, I feel even more compelled to get these paintings out to the world to elicit compassion and empathy for these refugees.

My project was called “Sojourn Empathies.” It was my desire that people will come to realize the suffering of these people with everything they have been through and will understand that we must embrace their lives and experiences with compassion and empathy.

I am so eternally grateful for the donations I received from Abby Lane, Jan Arnow, Bob Abrams, Johanna Boz, Ada Assenjo, Jane Larsen Wigger, Lauren Hill and Myrl Kirstein. The funds I was trying to reach with a Hatchfund Challenge was  2,000.00 though I didn’t make my goal, I was so grateful to my supporters and so determined to support this cause that I created these small paintings anyway.

Writing and painting by Jan Kirstein

To see these paintings as framed prints, mounted metal prints, stretched canvas prints and other useful items on Fineartamerca, click here.

 

 

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Jane Davies’ New Exhibion


img_1050

Submerge yourself into a sea of dynamic visual poetry by abstract painting master Jane Davies. In Janes’s paintings, the world is true to nature in form and integrity. Images embrace the viewer with harmonious discourse of color, shape, line, texture and pattern, all orchestrated with an instinctual genius for proportion, movement and intuitive balance.

Take some time  to pull yourself away from today’s political world upheavals if only for a few moments. Change the scenery. Replace your television  with  these paintings by Jane Davies.

Change your life by changing your scenery .  Gaze at these amazing paintings. Change the world by changing the scenery in front of your eyes. You can change the world, beginning with your own world. And that is always the best place to start.

Let these paintings enter your vision and dance in your soul.

Written by Jan Kirstein, Painter

 

 

img_1051

 

Edgewater Gallery: “I have new framed pieces up at Edgewater Gallery in Middlebury, VT.,” says Jane Davies. “If you’re in the area I hope you’ll stop by. You can also purchase from their website, Take a look.

 

 

 

 

Click to enlarge

 

 

 

JANE DAVIES
PAINTING + MIXED MEDIA
ARTIST STATEMENT

Formal elements are my first and foremost source of inspiration. I can be moved by a simple combination of color and line, or the relationships of shapes and edges, or the interplay between pattern and scale. I look at colors, textures and images out in the world as well: rocks, rust, surfaces affected by age, by marks of the human hand, by time and tides. But I also look at a lot of art in many mediums, and gorge myself on the infinite ways in which materials can be transformed into rich and expressive visual statements.
In my own art practice, focus on process is an essential component of developing work that feels authentic and personal. My process involves a back-and-forth play between spontaneous, intuitive mark-making, and careful deliberation and intention: I think of it as letting things happen, and making things happen. I make a move, and then the painting reveals something new to respond to. Each move changes the whole piece and sets up a new set of challenges. It takes practice and continued effort to stay present to this dialog and not get carried away by the desire for a quick result or an easy resolution. It requires trust in my own intuitive responses, and a willingness to not-know, to not have the route laid out like a road map.

 

img_1055

 

 

http://edgewatergallery.co/artists/jane-davies/

 

Visit Jane’s website:  http://www.janedaviesartgallery.com

 

Coming soon by Jane Davies:
New 100 Drawings: Starting October 4, 2017 – 10 interactive sessions online, find out more and register here.

 

 

 

On a more politically proactive note….Pink Postcards

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for viewing  the .KIRSTEINFINEART BLOG

 

True Inspiration: Helen Frankenthaler


 

To honor and support the Women’s March in Washington D.C. this week, I am would like to give tribute to some of my fav painters who have inspired me for a lifetime. Today it’s Helen Frankenthaler.

 

 

img_0793

Helen Frankenthaler, Europa, 1957, Oil on unsized, unprimed canvas, 70 x 54 1/2 x 2 inches (177.8 x 138.43 x 5.08 cm) © 2016 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Abstract Expressionism
Royal Academy of Arts
September 24, 2016 – January 2, 2017
This long-awaited exhibition reveals the full breadth of a movement that will forever be associated with the boundless creative energy of 1950s New York.

Traveling to:
Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Spain
February 03, 2017 – June 04, 2017

 

Hartung and Lyrical Painters
Fonds Hélène & Édouard Leclerc pour la Culture, Landerneau, France
December 11, 2016 – April 17, 2017
The exhibition positions the work of Hans Hartung with artists of the 1950’s such as Georges Mathieu, Gérard Schneider, Hantaï, and international artists from subsequent decades, including Helen Frankenthaler.

 

Women of Abstract Expressionism
The Mint Museum, Charlotte, NC
October 22, 2016 – January 22, 2017
The groundbreaking exhibition Women of Abstract Expressionism celebrates the often unknown female artists of this mid-twentieth century art movement.

Traveling to:
Palm Springs Art Museum, CA
February 18, 2017 – May 28, 2017

Originated:
Denver Art Museum, CO
June 12 – September 25, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

img_0775

 

 

img_0781

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Little Plug for my Justice Collection by Janis Kirstein. To see more click here.

img_0792

img_0790

 

img_0791

img_0786

 

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Marc Chagall


 

img_0384

 

Marc Chagall (French, born Russia – present-day Belarus; 1887-1985): Carmen, 1966. Lithograph. Image size: 39-1/2 x 25-11/16 inches (100.5 x 65.3 cm). Created in 1966 from a maquette for Chagall’s “Triumph of Music,” a series of 3 large-scale decorations created for the Metropolitan Opera House in New York (Carmen, The Magic Flute, Romeo and Juliet). © Marc Chagall.

‘Chagall created this piece for the opera “Carmen” by George Bizet upon its opening at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. The print is a small detail from a preliminary painting of Chagall’s much larger “The Triumph of Music”, which now hangs at the Metropolitan Opera.’

“Chagall: Midsummer Night’s Dreams”
Through January 8, 2017
Carrières de Lumières, Les Baux de Provence, France
http://bit.ly/2heyQmy

Exhibition:
“Winter Exhibition 2016”
Until February 15, 2017
Gilden’s Art Gallery, London

Thanks to:  #IRequireArt @irequireart #art

 

img_0383

Born Moishe Shagal
6 July 1887 (N.S.)
Liozna, near Vitebsk, Russian Empire (present-day Belarus)
Died 28 March 1985 (aged 97)
Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France
Nationality Russian, later French
Known for Painting stained glass
Movement :  Cubism Expressionism

 
Marc Zakharovich Chagall (/ʃəˈɡɑːl/ shə-gahl,  6 July [O.S. 24 June] 1887 – 28 March 1985) was a Russian-French artist. An early modernist, he was associated with several major artistic styles and created works in virtually every artistic format, including painting, book illustrations, stained glass, stage sets, ceramic, tapestries and fine art prints.

Art critic Robert Hughes referred to Chagall as “the quintessential Jewish artist of the twentieth century” (though Chagall saw his work as “not the dream of one people but of all humanity”). According to art historian Michael J. Lewis, Chagall was considered to be “the last survivor of the first generation of European modernists”. For decades, he “had also been respected as the world’s preeminent Jewish artist”. Using the medium of stained glass, he produced windows for the cathedrals of Reims and Metz, windows for the UN, and the Jerusalem Windows in Israel. He also did large-scale paintings, including part of the ceiling of the Paris Opéra.

Before World War I, he traveled between St. Petersburg, Paris, and Berlin. During this period he created his own mixture and style of modern art based on his idea of Eastern European Jewish folk culture. He spent the wartime years in Soviet Belarus, becoming one of the country’s most distinguished artists and a member of the modernist avant-garde, founding the Vitebsk Arts College before leaving again for Paris in 1922.

He had two basic reputations, writes Lewis: as a pioneer of modernism and as a major Jewish artist. He experienced modernism’s “golden age” in Paris, where “he synthesized the art forms of Cubism, Symbolism, and Fauvism, and the influence of Fauvism gave rise to Surrealism.”  Yet throughout these phases of his style “he remained most emphatically a Jewish artist, whose work was one long dreamy reverie of life in his native village of Vitebsk.”

“When Matisse dies,” Pablo Picasso remarked in the 1950s, “Chagall will be the only painter left who understands what colour really is.”

9fdbfee5-cb4a-4a12-a71a-387775c42088-712-000000e92a5d057e_tmp

Marc Chagall

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Jean Michel Basquiat


img_0377img_0376img_0378img_0379img_0380
QUICK FACTS

NAME
Jean-Michel Basquiat
OCCUPATION
Painter
BIRTH DATE
December 22, 1960
DEATH DATE
August 12, 1988
PLACE OF BIRTH
Brooklyn, New York
PLACE OF DEATH
New York, New York
NICKNAME
“SAMO”

Jean-Michel Basquiat was a Neo-Expressionist painter in the 1980s. He is best known for his primitive style and his collaboration with pop artist Andy Warhol.

Synopsis

Jean-Michel Basquiat was born on December 22, 1960, in Brooklyn, New York. He first attracted attention for his graffiti under the name “SAMO” in New York City. He sold sweatshirts and postcards featuring his artwork on the streets before his painting career took off. He collaborated with Andy Warhol in the mid-1980s, which resulted in a show of their work. Basquiat died on August 12, 1988, in New York City.

 

Early Years

Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat was born in Brooklyn, New York, on December 22, 1960. With a Haitian-American father and a Puerto Rican mother, Basquiat’s diverse cultural heritage was one of his many sources of inspiration.

A self-taught artist, Basquiat began drawing at an early age on sheets of paper his father, an accountant, brought home from the office. As he delved deeper into his creative side, his mother strongly encouraged to pursue artistic talents.

Basquiat first attracted attention for his graffiti in New York City in the late 1970s, under the name “SAMO.” Working with a close friend, he tagged subway trains and Manhattan buildings with cryptic aphorisms.

In 1977, Basquiat quit high school a year before he was slated to graduate. To make ends meet, he sold sweatshirts and postcards featuring his artwork on the streets of his native New York.

Commercial Success

Three years of struggle gave way to fame in 1980, when his work was featured in a group show. His work and style received critical acclaim for the fusion of words, symbols, stick figures, and animals. Soon, his paintings came to be adored by an art loving public that had no problem paying as much as $50,000 for a Basquiat original.

His rise coincided with the emergence of a new art movement, Neo-Expressionism, ushering in a wave of new, young and experimental artists that included Julian Schnabel and Susan Rothenberg.

In the mid 1980s, Basquiat collaborated with famed pop artist Andy Warhol, which resulted in a show of their work that featured a series of corporate logos and cartoon characters.

On his own, Basquiat continued to exhibit around the country and the world. In 1986, he traveled to Africa for a show in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. That same year, the 25-year-old exhibited nearly 60 paintings at the Kestner-Gesellschaft Gallery in Hanover, Germany—becoming the youngest artist to ever showcase his work there.

Personal Problems

As his popularity soared, so did Basquiat’s personal problems. By the mid-1980s, friends became increasingly concerned by his excessive drug use. He became paranoid and isolated himself from the world around him for long stretches. Desperate to kick a heroin addiction, he left New York for Hawaii in 1988, returning a few months later and claiming to be sober.

Sadly, he wasn’t. Basquiat died of a drug overdose on August 12, 1988, in New York City. He was 27 years old. Although his art career was brief, Jean-Michel Basquiat has been credited with bringing the African-American and Latino experience in the elite art world.

Jean-Michel Basquiat Biography
Author

Biography.com Editors
Website Name

http://www.biography.com/people/jean-michel-basquiat-185851

 

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Coffee or Tea?


Sitting in front of your favorite friend/painting/window/window enjoying a nice warm cup of coffee, or tea? Take time during this festive season to relax and reconnect.

These coffee mugs present a group of November and December fine art collages by Janis KIRSTEIN.Click  here to shop for a mug, prints, pillows, duvet covers or other designer accessories. Holiday gifts for all your unique and special friends….check it out!

Collector’s Choice: Kandinsky


49.1224

Vasily Kandinsky

Fragments

In 1933, the Nazis closed the Bauhaus in Dessau, Germany (where it had been relocated from Weimar), and Vasily Kandinsky settled in Neuilly-sur-Seine, near Paris, where he lived until his death in 1944. During these years, he returned to the themes and iconography of Theosophy, an esoteric philosophy that sought to understand the connections between the universe, the divine, and the individual that had interested the artist before World War I. The central motif of the tentacled, amoeba-like form in Fragments recurs in Kandinsky’s late work, and has been interpreted as a Theosophical cypher for greed or a stand-in for the complex emotions felt throughout Europe in the wake of World War II.

Fragments is divided into independent floating elements, which include a miniature picture within a picture. This compositional device first appeared in Kandinsky’s work in 1929, and he used it to enforce spatial relationships and to render the illusion of three-dimensionality. In Fragments, four separate amalgamations of colors, forms, and odd shapes are suspended in a field of mosaic-like elements, the smaller pictures more vividly colored than their muted ground. The artist wished the viewer to feel compelled, by virtue of layered planes and seemingly recessive space, to mentally enter his paintings.

 

 

kandinsky-8

 

Vasily Kandinsky

1866, MOSCOW; D. 1944, NEUILLY-SUR-SEINE, FRANCE

 

Vasily Kandinsky was born on December 4, 1866, in Moscow. From 1886 through 1892 he studied law and economics at the University of Moscow, where he lectured after graduation. In 1896 he declined a teaching position in order to study art in Munich with Anton Azbe from 1897 to 1899 and at the Kunstakademie with Franz von Stuck in 1900.

 

45.977

 

Kandinsky taught in 1901–03 at the art school of the Phalanx, a group he cofounded in Munich. One of his students, Gabriele Münter, would be his companion until 1914.

 

kandinsky-7

In 1902 Kandinsky exhibited for the first time with the Berlin Secession and produced his first woodcuts. In 1903 and 1904 he began his travels in Italy, the Netherlands, and North Africa and his visits to Russia. He showed at the Salon d’Automne in Paris from 1904.

kandinsky-6

In 1909 Kandinsky was elected president of the newly founded Neue Künstlervereinigung München (NKVM). The group’s first show took place at Heinrich Thannhauser’s Moderne Galerie in Munich in 1909. In 1911 Kandinsky and Franz Marc began to make plans for Der Blaue Reiter Almanac, although the publication would not appear until the following year.

kandinsky-2

Kandinsky’s On the Spiritual in Art was published in December 1911. He and Marc withdrew from the NKVM in that month, and shortly thereafter the Blaue Reiter group’s first exhibition was held at the Moderne Galerie. In 1912 the second Blaue Reiter show was held at the Galerie Hans Goltz, Munich. Kandinsky’s first solo show was held at Der Sturm gallery in Berlin in 1912. In 1913 one of his works was included in the Armory Show in New York and the Erste deutsche Herbstsalon at the Der Sturm gallery in Berlin. Kandinsky lived in Russia from 1914 to 1921, principally in Moscow, where he held a position at the People’s Commissariat of Education.

kandinsky-1

Kandinsky began teaching at the Bauhaus in Weimar in 1922. In 1923 he was given his first solo show in New York by the Société Anonyme, of which he became vice-president. Lyonel Feininger, Alexej Jawlensky, Kandinsky, and Paul Klee made up the Blaue Vier (Blue Four) group, formed in 1924. He moved with the Bauhaus to Dessau in 1925 and became a German citizen in 1928. The Nazi government closed the Bauhaus in 1933 and later that year Kandinsky settled in Neuilly-sur-Seine, near Paris; he acquired French citizenship in 1939. Fifty-seven of his works were confiscated by the Nazis in the 1937 purge of “degenerate art.” Kandinsky died on December 13, 1944, in Neuilly.

Thanks to www.guggenheim.org website for the story and images.