You’ll love this idea!


 

 

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Hi everyone!

First, I want to let you know that I am getting ready to feature more awesome, creative fine artist painters in the very near future, but I have been recently sick. I think I’m finally getting better because today I had the strength to plant some herbs and flowers. A very God sign (I meant to type good, but God works just as well) ,  I think!

In the meanwhile, I wanted to share my new line of mix and match “Circus Buddies” items to delight your Inner Child! I am opening up a Shopify outlet on my Facebook page Kirsteinfineart in 5 days, but you can get your items at a discount early  click   here.

Browse the collection, and let me know if you have a favorite! If you choose to click the above link, it will take you directly to my manufacturing outlet Fineartamerica. Here is how it works. Click on an image you prefer in all Circus Buddies images. Then look to the right for a menu of all the various items. You will see many choices: pillows, duvet covers, shower curtains, prints, posters, cards, totes, beach towels, etc.

Have fun “shopping” with my Circus Buddies!

I hope to be back in gear in a few more days, so can get out some more artist features! Meanwhile, enjoy your summer!

 

Jan Kirstein

Click on these thumbnails to enlarge.

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Reading Cy Twombly: Poetry in Paint


Reading Cy Twombly

By Mary Jacobus

September 16, 2016
ARTS & CULTURE
These images, selected from my book Reading Cy Twombly: Poetry in Paint, indicate the range and provocation of Cy Twombly’s works on canvas and paper, pointing especially to his inventive use of literary quotation and allusion throughout his long career and his relation to poetry as an inspiration for his art.

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Twombly’s working copy of a paperback translation of Three Secret Poems, by the twentieth-century Greek poet George Seferis, shows his hands-on approach to quotation and revision as well as paint stains from his work in progress. A number of marked passages reappear in Twombly’s paintings of the mid-1990s, notably in Quattro Stagioni (1993–94) and Say Goodbye, Catullus, to the Shores of Asia Minor (finally completed in 1994).

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One of a sequence of related drawings, Venus and Adonis (1978) wittily alludes to Shakespeare’s poem of the same title. Along with a series of cleft heart-shaped (buttock-shaped?) and phallic forms poised in suggestive proximity, each drawing contains a flower-like scribble and a foldout book. Perhaps Twombly is alluding to the “flowers” of poetry as well as to Venus’s rival, the boar who gores Adonis with his amorous tusk.

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Il Parnasso (1964) riffs on Raphael’s Renaissance fresco in the papal Stanza della Segnatura. Twombly responds in his own fashion to the auratic cultural icons of Rome, drawing attention to the missing role of painting in the representation of learning and culture. The play of line replaces the playing of Apollo’s lyre at the apex of Raphael’s design. Signing himself in the shuttered rectangular window around which Raphael’s fresco arches, Twombly draws attention to the flat surface of the “wail” or support.

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The early series of works on paper Poems to the Sea (1959) shows Twombly’s use of horizon line, wave signs, and quasi-writing, along with thick creamy paint, to eroticize the abstract play of repetition. In a series that makes reference to Sappho, Twombly also seems to be alluding to the typographical experiment of Mallarmé’s shipwreck poem, Un Coup de Dés, as a sequence of rhythmic marks and blanks. Non-referential signs tussle with the impulse to “read” and “write,” as if words and thoughts were about to be born from the waters of the Mediterranean.

 

 

 

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Synopsis of a Battle (1968) takes Twombly’s blackboard paintings of the late 1960s in the direction of the era’s obsession with space travel, alluding to the blackboard calculations of NASA scientists as well as his own fascination with weightlessness. Abstruse mathematical formulas and recurrent fan shapes suggest orbiting gyrations, rather than battle formations. Cyanotype blueprints for gravity-defying Gemini and Apollo spacecraft were widely available at the time. Here, Twombly designs his own prototype.

 

 

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Twombly’s paired paintings, Bacchus Psilax and Bacchus Mainomenos (2004) show the winged Bacchus morphing into his identical twin, the raging mad god who unleashes a title of blood. Painted during the bloodiest years of the Iraq occupation, when the first and second Battles of Fallujah brought the heaviest urban fighting since the Vietnam War, the Bacchus series has been linked to the fury of Achilles’s twelve-day brutalization of Hector’s body, towed around the grave mount of Patroclus. Twombly’s work elsewhere refers to the destruction of Sumerian cultural heritage.

 

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CY TWOMBLY, HERO AND LEANDRO, PART II, 1981–84. OIL-BASED HOUSE PAINT, OIL PAINT (PAINT STICK) ON CANVAS, 61 3⁄8″ × 80 1⁄2″. © CY TWOMBLY FOUNDATION. PHOTO COURTESY KARSTEN GREVE, ST. MORITZ.

The middle painting from Twombly’s sequence, Hero and Leandro (1981–84), suggests his interest in the whiteout—an obliteration that is also a kind of memory. As the sea washes through the story of Leandro’s drowning, the liquidity of water and paint eradicate the visible. Drawing on another Mediterranean narrative, Twombly combines his lifelong fascination with the sea with the erasure of a forgotten name, hidden in the darkness at lower right—not Leandro’s, but Hero’s.

 

 

 

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CY TWOMBLY, UNTITLED (TO SAPPHO), 1976, OIL, WAX CRAYON ON DRAWING CARDBOARD, 59″ × 53 1⁄4″. © CY TWOMBLY FOUNDATION. COURTESY ARCHIVES FONDAZIONE NICOLA DEL ROSCIO.

Twombly’s “homage” to Sappho in Untitled (To Sappho) (1976) creates an erotic visual poem out of Sappho’s fragmentary epithalamium, using purple (the mark of consummation and death) both to celebrate and to mourn Hyacinthus’s death and transformation into a flower. The juxtaposition of paint and poetry marks the conjunction of the pastoral strain and the pastoral “stain”—painting and sexuality. Twombly’s relation to pastoral suggests, not so much nostalgia as the modern artist’s inextricable entanglement with sociality.

 

 

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CY TWOMBLY, ORPHEUS, 1975, COLLAGE: OIL PAINT, COLOR PENCIL, SCOTCH TAPE ON PAPER, 55 1⁄2″ × 39 3⁄8″. © CY TWOMBLY FOUNDATION. COURTESY ARCHIVES FONDAZIONE NICOLA DEL ROSCIO. PHOTO: MIMMO CAPONE

Twombly’s recurrent preoccupation with Rilke’s Orpheus sonnets emerges in numerous paintings, drawings, and sculptures. His collage Orpheus (1975) quotes from Rilke’s “Be in advance of all parting” (“be a ringing glass that shivers even as it rings”), beneath a repeated broken line that seems to record a break in the fabric of life. Here, an oblique line has its start in the faint pink of erotic passion. Spare and epitaphic, the broken ascent echoes Rilke’s emphasis on “the realm of decline” inhabited by the poet.

This article originally appeared in the Paris Review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nancy Hirsch Lassen: Collectors’ Choice


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https://www.nancyhirschlassenartist.com

ABOUT NANCY HIRSCH LASSEN
Artist’s Statement

I adore color. . .that’s my passion and, I think, my special gift. I especially love the juxtaposition of color and the evolutionary interplay of color on canvas. Purely contemporary, non-representational paintings intrigue me most at present. I begin my process with lots of texture, line, brushstrokes and glazes, then follow the paint’s lead. The challenge is to keep the excitement of the process evident in the final product. . .fresh and exhilarating!

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The Artist

Nancy Hirsch Lassen is a native of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. She discovered her passion for art early on, and pursued a career in art and interior design. She received her BA degree from Newcomb College in 1975, where she spent her junior year attending the University of Madrid studying art history in the Prado. After Newcomb, Nancy remained in New Orleans where she started her own design firm, Interiors & Extras, now in it’s 30th year.

She is currently represented by Bev’s Fine Art in Raleigh, North Carolina, Bay Life in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, and has produced numerous commissions in New York City. Recently, forty-eight original pieces were commissioned and installed in the new University Medical Center in New Orleans and she was one of twenty finalists in the Bombay Sapphire New Orleans show. She has commissioned works in the Federal Reserve Bank of New Orleans and her paintings have also been featured in movies and television shows filmed in the New Orleans area. Nancy always looks forward to and welcomes exciting and inspiring new projects and commissions.

 

Lee Brewster: To Capture a Moment in Time


 

 

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If an artist can capture a moment in a lightening strike of eloquently drawn lines and painted strokes of pigment, then why do so many artists feel it is necessary to overlabor over creating ? Is a rendition of the moment with dutiful work ethic, and a heavy sense of responsibility always more valuable than a direct moment of complete insight?

By viewing paintings by  Lee Brewster, one can see that it is entirely possible for  an artist to perfectly align with the universe in a delightful harmony, and capture this moment of spontaneous truth. When this happens, you have a major miracle.

This is the work of painter Lee Brewster, who’s baby steps capture the larger heart and soul of reality in a most certain, profound and complete way.

Jan Kirstein

 

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“today in the studio I had one of those sacred moments. it brought me back to why I love art-making & came when I added a thin layer of white to parts of this little paper piece. I can’t say that it’s done, but it is much improved by what was added today. this piece has been sitting in my studio…waiting. i never gave up on it when it was ugly & awkward, because I saw something worth saving in it compositionally. i love the messiness (or mistakes, if you choose to call them that) from the past & that you can still see shadows of them. mostly I love what I learned about life: that for all those times when I didn’t look like much, someone saw something in me worth keeping around & investing in. someone had a vision for what I would become. so…this little piece of paper with black & white marks on it was my teacher today. she’s is imperfectly beautiful & wise & worthy and I’m calling her “grace”

Lee Brewster

Artist

Franklin, TN.

 

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Canal Cheong-Jagerroos: Field of Dreams


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Canal Cheong-Jagerroos’ paintings combine the best of Eastern and Western cultural perspectives to present paintings rich in surface, sensitivity and sensibility. Some of her paintings are created on rolls of rice paper and some hang from the wall in a scroll motif, extending down to and across the floor in a continuing flow of tactile viscerility.   References to Eastern calligraphy combine symbology, characters and scroll format with Western influences of the freedoms inherent in abstract expressionism to envelop the viewer in an ocean of texture, shape, movement and tactile presence.

Jan Kirstein


Canal Cheong-Jagerroos (b.1968) is a Chinese contemporary visual artist who grew up in an artistic family in Macau. She currently lives and works between Helsinki, Nice and Berlin.

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Canal Cheong-Jagerroos has since lived and worked for 25 years in numerous countries from Asia to Europe and Africa before settling with her family in Finland. The unique experience of having lived in such culturally diverse cities and countries, namely; Hong Kong, Shanghai, France, Switzerland, Italy, Africa and Finland has influenced her work greatly. Therefore, whether as consciously or subconsciously, these exceptional cultural experiences have shaped Canal’s later works. Canal has discovered that walking the line between the east and west, facing different cultures, can be both constructive and destructive, but always inspirational.


In 1992, Canal began working in Chinese freehand style brush-strokes inspired by Chinese ancient abstract great master Bada Shenren’s (1626—1705) and influenced by her mentor Laozi (530 BC), a contemporary of Confucius during the 5th century BCE. This has motivated her shift of focus to ancient Chinese symbols and combining them with modern daily elements to extract the utopianism world. In the process of this exploration——through tearing, destroying, separating or even inadvertently trampling on the rice paper on which the artist has already painted, she was then overlapping layers and layers of the paintings with Xuan paper on the canvas. The whole creation process is fully involved with construction, deconstruction, and reconstruct. By using multiple layers of rice paper, acrylic, ink, traditional Chinese pigments and ready made objects which are incorporated together, the artist makes it possible to derive a sense of depth on canvas.; again, by blending ancient Chinese motifs and modern elements, she integrates the past with the present through symbolic creations that depict the peace and harmony of a Utopian world.


Canal Cheong-Jagerroos has won international recognition and acclaim for her unique works of fusing ancient Chinese motifs and contemporary elements. She has enjoyed considerable success over the last 20 years with over 50 worldwide solo and selected exhibitions to her credit. Her artworks have been represented in numerous prestige galleries in Switzerland, France, Italy, Sweden, Finland, Macau, Hong Kong, Africa and she was included in the 55th Venice Biennale in 2013. The majority of Canal’s works are in public and private collections worldwide.

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Canal Cheong-Jagerroos is the co-founder of the ongoing ‘Blue and Red Art project,’ which will be holding exhibitions in numerous museums in China and Finland from 2018 – 2020.

Upcoming Exhibitions:
2017 LA Art Show, Los Angeles, USA
2017 Art Palm Beach, Florida, USA
2017 Art Boca Raton, Florida, USA
2017 Artist In Residency, Beijing, China
2017 ‘Waking / 苏醒’ Solo Exhibition, Being 3 Gallery, Beijing, China
2017 Art Southampton, NY, USA
2017 Finlayson Art Centre, B&RAP, Finland
2017 Basel Art Center, B&RAP, Basel, Switzerland
2018 Xian Art Museum, Xian, B&RAP, China

www.canaljagerroos.com

Arturo Pacheco Lugo : A Statement of Presence


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“In the beginning of painting is a struggling soul,

thus painting is a phenomenon of the soul.

The work must redeem a passionate soul.

In a poetic image, the soul states its presence.”

G. Bachelard.

 

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To look at a painting by Lugo is like sifting through an archeological dig, moving through layer upon layer of earth.  Barely recognizable forms emerge into a conscious gestalt where meanings galvanize through the viewer’s own personal references and connections.

Jan Kirstein

 

 

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Arturo Pacheco Lugo was born in the city of Puebla, Mexico on November 12, 1961.

He studied fine arts in the workshops of painters Jose Luis Hernandez and Sando Berger during the early years of his formation as an artist.

 

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Lugo uses experimental techniques, materials and creative processes and aesthetic applications and has had numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout his artistic life.  His works are sought after by collectors worldwide.

 

 

 

 

Karen Jacobs: Remnants and Patterns


To look at the art pieces of Karen Jacobs is to experience the magic of the dance of organic movement against a stable time frame for reference. Through each window of a partial grid, one sees flickering moments captured in time. At once, the pieces reveal the moment against the continuum of time in a paradox of multiple juxtapositions. These pieces invite deep contemplation.

Jan Kirstein

 

Karen’s work is influenced by the Bokusho – “The term bokusho refers to abstract sumi-e or calligraphic drawings. My rice paper/ India ink gestures are torn, manipulated, collaged and incorporated into textured canvas paintings. ”  Karen Jacobs

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About the Art

“An ongoing interest in the linear juxtaposition of remnants and patterns has led much of my work to be classified as geometric abstraction. Organized by divisions which aren’t always precise and shapes which tend to stack and interlock, the work may remain totally abstract or venture into suggestions of landscape or other elements of nature.”

 

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“There is, perhaps, a seed of an idea when I begin but I am quickly directed by the work, answering the needs, sorting the puzzles and discovering solutions. I work with layers of thick and thin color, washed or scumbled over a textured surface. Traces are left by the pentimento of assorted mark makers and scrached or removed paint; lines are straight, curved or gestural, surfaces are wiped, dripped and spattered; all adding to an eventual sense of accumulation and the essence of time.”

 

 

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“Though most paintings are acrylic/mixed media on canvas, I often venture into other media such as oil, watercolor, encaustic and ink… in addition to other painting forms such as the structural boxes I call Pylons which may be either wall hung or free standing.”

 

 

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About the Artist

 

 

“The early years of my art education and career were pursued as possible, second to the needs of a mobile military family. A move to Washington, D.C. permitted both the time and opportunity for studies at the Maryland College of Art and Design and with outstanding local artists and teachers. My learning experience continued through both outside sources and personal exploration wherever we happened to be.”

 

 

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“From high detail realism to total abstraction, I’ve always sought my own way and allowed the work to develop independently. My preferred medium is acrylic as it allows the impulsive changes necessary to my process, but I’ve worked extensively in nearly all painting mediums from watercolor to oils and encaustics plus several original print processes.”

 

 

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“My professional career has included representation in numerous galleries from Santa Fe to D.C., New York to New Orleans, Memphis and Atlanta. I’ve competed and won awards internationally and my work is in private and corporate collections around the world. I currently live in Birmingham, Alabama.”

 

.karenjacobs.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Krista Harris: Emerse Yourself


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Looking at paintings by Krista Harris is like stepping out into a cool Spring shower at dusk.  Light flickers off forms and shapes to reveal layers of textured surfaces permeated  with ethereal incandescence.

Jan Kirstein

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Words from Krista Harris:

“My work is driven by an intense curiosity about places and the ways in which they connect, divide or define us. How do we fit in, what’s our place in the world? Is it where we grow up or some adopted location that we connect with on a deeper level?”

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“The individual and unique parts of a place…it’s culture and traditions, the languages, ethnic and architectural components, the quality of light, the color of the wind, the food, climate and terrain are all visual pieces of the puzzle.”

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“A lifelong case of wanderlust has left me with a visual scrapbook of sights and sounds, even smells and bits of dialogue which seem to sneak into my work. I don’t intentionally set out to recreate a scene and I’m often surprised to see them. It’s rarely even a single location but bits and pieces jumbled together. They become blurry postcards and reconstructed maps that help me make sense of the world.”

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“Painting is a very physical process for me, beginning days or weeks before I ever begin. Each step is as integral to the process as the application of paint and mark, including reading and researching, stretching canvases, mixing new colors, searching for new tools and experimenting with methods of working.”

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“Risk and uncertainty are an artist’s friend, and I try to keep the painting open to all possibilities, deviations and directions – where it’s outcome is not yet known and anything can happen. Taking a wrong turn or unexpected direction is often more productive than getting things right, and getting lost can have surprising outcomes. Working back and forth between organic and architectural elements, patterns and textures, colors, tangles of marks is the process that keeps me engaged and the sense of mystery alive and well.”

http://kristaharris.com

Krista Harris currently lives and works in Southwest Colorado.

Collector’s Choice: Laura Iniesta


 

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The Spanish painter, Laura Iniesta, was born in Barcelona in 1955 and her first exhibitions were in this city.

 

She has exhibited and lived in America for a long period following her life in Barcelona, during which she  was impacted with its exuberant tropics.  This experience reflects positively on her work enhancing her propensity for abundant and verdant expression through paint.

 

 

Her Mediterranean heart brought her to a return to Barcelona, where her studio was installed. From there, her works for many exhibitions and projects at national and international levels were profusely created.

 

 

Her work expands with grand gestural movements and markings of paint and drawing materials, directly establishing a visual impact of balance and enormous aesthetic strength. In the presence of Laura’s paintings, the viewer becomes greatly moved by the monumental movements of painterly gesture, making it impossible to remain indifferent to the painting’s presence.

 

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Collages by Lee McKenna


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The collages by Lee McKenna are imbedded with a sense of the passage of time and the compression of memories as if from a dream. From the field of torn shapes emerges  the hopes and memories of a love drifting through time.

Jan Kirstein

 

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“Mystical Poems of Rumi 1”, A.J. Arberry
The University of Chicago Press, 1968

This is love: to fly to heaven, every moment to rend a hundred veils;
At first instance, to break away from breath — first step, to renounce feet;
To disregard this world, to see only that which you yourself have seen6 .
I said, “Heart, congratulations on entering the circle of lovers,
“On gazing beyond the range of the eye, on running into the alley of the breasts.”
Whence came this breath, O heart? Whence came this throbbing, O heart?
Bird, speak the tongue of birds: I can heed your cipher!
The heart said, “I was in the factory whilst the home of water and clay was abaking.
“I was flying from the workshop whilst the workshop was being created.
“When I could no more resist, they dragged me; how shall I
tell the manner of that dragging?”

 

 

 

The work of Australian artist Lee McKenna can be found here:     http://leeamckenna.bigcartel.com