Justice: You Know You Want It!


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The Justice Collection gives you a way to speak your truth, with the bold statement of a Chinese Character representing the word Justice. Speak your truth in a variety of ways, with coffee/tea mugs, tshirts, dresses, tops, shower curtains, duvet covers, and more. I invite you to find all these items in my new Shopify store:

 

http://kirsteinfineart.myshopify.com

 

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Click on thumbnails to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

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A WAY TO REMEMBER: MEMORIAL DAY


 

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Located in Frankfort, Kentucky, overlooking the state capital, Kentucky Vietnam Veterans Memorial contains the name of 1,103 Kentuckians killed in the Vietnam War. The memorial is in the form of a sundial with the names placed so that the tip of the gnomon’s shadow touches each man’s name on the date of his death, thus giving each fallen warrior his own personal memorial day.

A Way To Remember

The Kentucky Vietnam Veterans Memorial Foundation, non-profit organization, was created by the Kentucky General Assembly on March 23, 1984 “to design and raise the necessary funds for a monument to those Kentuckians who fought and died in Vietnam.
Funds for construction were provided through private donations from business, corporate and individual sources. The site overlooking the state capitol was donated by the Commonwealth of Kentucky in 1987. Upon completion, ownership of the memorial will be transferred to the state, with perpetual maintenance by the Memorial Fund.
The design for the memorial was selected by an anonymous competition which required that each entrant submit a scale model of the design. The criteria for design stated “The monument should be distinctive yet dignified. It should not seek to imitate other monuments yet it should evoke an emotional remembrance while being aesthetically authentic as a work of art. The monument should display the names of all Kentuckians who died in the Vietnam Conflict…or who are still unaccounted for.”
The design unanimously selected was that of Helm Roberts, a Kentucky architect and Naval aviator during the period between Korea and Vietnam. The groundbreaking ceremony and gnomon dedication, by Governor Martha Layne Collins, was held November 7, 1987. The remaining work for the memorial was done during the summer of 1988. The memorial was dedicated on November 12, 1988 by Governor Wallace Wilkinson.

Design Concept

Tip of Shadow on Name

 

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The memorial was conceived to be a place of quiet meditation to contemplate the nature of the Vietnam War and also to be a place of ceremony to honor those lost in this conflict. The hours of the sundial represent the years of the war, thus each sector between the walkways includes one year of Kentucky losses. The length of the shadow of the gnomon varies with the date of the year, with the longest shadows at the Winter Solstice on December 21 and the shortest on June 21, the Summer Solstice. Each name on the plaza is placed on the sunline for the date of death between these extremes, The exact time of this anniversary is unique for each name, but does not vary from year to year.
The arrangement of names was intended to show the pattern of Kentucky casualties for the Vietnam War. The first two deaths occurred in 1962 and the last person was killed in 1975. The year of heaviest losses was 1968, which falls between Noon and 1:00 PM, Eastern Standard Time. The names of those missing in action or prisoners of war are located in front of the gnomon, where the shadow never falls.
Veterans Day ceremonies are commemorated by an inscription located on the Plaza where the shadow falls on November 11 at 11:11 AM, the date and time which marked the Armistice in 1918 which ended the first World War.
The Meditation Area looking down on the plaza provides a distant view of the state capitol, framed by the gnomon and the flags of America and Kentucky.
The circle of stones around the base of the gnomon are inscribed with the verse from Ecclesiastes 3:1-8:
For everything there is a season;
and a time for every matter under heaven:
A time to be born, and a time to die;
A time to plant, and a time pluck up what is planted;
A time to kill, and a time to heal,
A time to break down, and a time to build up;
A time to weep, and a time to laugh;
A time to mourn, and a time to dance;
A time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together;
A time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing;
A time to seek, and a time to lose;
A time to keep, and a time to cast away;
A time to rend, and a time to sew;
A time to keep silence, and a time to speak;
A time to love, and a time to hate;
A time for war, and a time for peace.

Memorial Data

Plaza Plan and Name Pattern

 

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The curved lines on the plaza mark the location of the Summer and Winter Solstice and show the path of the shortest and longest shadows of the year. The straight East/West line locates the path of the Spring and Fall Equinox. The times inscribed on the stone outer circle represent natural or “Sun” time. The walkways are located at the mean position of Eastern Standard Time. The inner circle is marked with words from Ecclesiastes which reflect upon the nature of time and the seasons.
The gnomon, or pointer stands 14.62′ above the surface of the plaza and is 24.27′ long, measured along its spine. The angle of the gnomon is equal to the latitude, or 38o 10’25” from horizontal and points to the true North Pole and Polaris, the North Star. The gnomon was cut from 3/16″ thick stainless steel and fabricated in Springfield, Oregon by metal sculptor and welding engineer Arthur Ross Cady.
The Plaza is 89′-4″ long by 71′-1½” wide, including the benches. The plaza floor contains 327 pieces of 4″+ thick granite with pieces ranging from 2421 to 66 pounds in weight. The average weight of each plaza slab is 1,144 pounds. The largest pieces are 12′ long. The benchwork has 120 pieces weighing over 20 tons. The weight of all granite in the memorial is 215 tons.
All granite for the memorial was cut from the “Pyramid Blue” quarry located in Elberton, Georgia.[4] The face of each piece was honed to remove saw marks and finished with a sand-blasted surface to provide the lightest possible color to contrast with the gnomon shadow. All granite fabrication was done in Elberton from computer generated drawings, which included full sized templates for exact location and spelling of each name.
Lettering and linework was incised into the granite using rubber stencils and sandblasting. All engraving was done in the factory with the exception of the summer and winter solstice and bench lines, which were done in place. The lettering of all names, months and the Ecclesiastes verse is the same lettering used for official government stone grave markers throughout the nation, including Arlington National Cemetery.
The Flagpoles are 35′ high and are located 10′ to each side of the True North line. The area north of the Winter Solstice line is designed for ceremonies on national holidays, Memorial Day, Independence Day and Veterans Day.

 

 

To see more of the photograph at the top of this page of The Kentucky Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial by Janis Kirstein, click here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canal Cheong-Jagerroos: Field of Dreams


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Canal Cheong-Jagerroos’ paintings combine the best of Eastern and Western cultural perspectives to present paintings rich in surface, sensitivity and sensibility. Some of her paintings are created on rolls of rice paper and some hang from the wall in a scroll motif, extending down to and across the floor in a continuing flow of tactile viscerility.   References to Eastern calligraphy combine symbology, characters and scroll format with Western influences of the freedoms inherent in abstract expressionism to envelop the viewer in an ocean of texture, shape, movement and tactile presence.

Jan Kirstein


Canal Cheong-Jagerroos (b.1968) is a Chinese contemporary visual artist who grew up in an artistic family in Macau. She currently lives and works between Helsinki, Nice and Berlin.

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Canal Cheong-Jagerroos has since lived and worked for 25 years in numerous countries from Asia to Europe and Africa before settling with her family in Finland. The unique experience of having lived in such culturally diverse cities and countries, namely; Hong Kong, Shanghai, France, Switzerland, Italy, Africa and Finland has influenced her work greatly. Therefore, whether as consciously or subconsciously, these exceptional cultural experiences have shaped Canal’s later works. Canal has discovered that walking the line between the east and west, facing different cultures, can be both constructive and destructive, but always inspirational.


In 1992, Canal began working in Chinese freehand style brush-strokes inspired by Chinese ancient abstract great master Bada Shenren’s (1626—1705) and influenced by her mentor Laozi (530 BC), a contemporary of Confucius during the 5th century BCE. This has motivated her shift of focus to ancient Chinese symbols and combining them with modern daily elements to extract the utopianism world. In the process of this exploration——through tearing, destroying, separating or even inadvertently trampling on the rice paper on which the artist has already painted, she was then overlapping layers and layers of the paintings with Xuan paper on the canvas. The whole creation process is fully involved with construction, deconstruction, and reconstruct. By using multiple layers of rice paper, acrylic, ink, traditional Chinese pigments and ready made objects which are incorporated together, the artist makes it possible to derive a sense of depth on canvas.; again, by blending ancient Chinese motifs and modern elements, she integrates the past with the present through symbolic creations that depict the peace and harmony of a Utopian world.


Canal Cheong-Jagerroos has won international recognition and acclaim for her unique works of fusing ancient Chinese motifs and contemporary elements. She has enjoyed considerable success over the last 20 years with over 50 worldwide solo and selected exhibitions to her credit. Her artworks have been represented in numerous prestige galleries in Switzerland, France, Italy, Sweden, Finland, Macau, Hong Kong, Africa and she was included in the 55th Venice Biennale in 2013. The majority of Canal’s works are in public and private collections worldwide.

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Canal Cheong-Jagerroos is the co-founder of the ongoing ‘Blue and Red Art project,’ which will be holding exhibitions in numerous museums in China and Finland from 2018 – 2020.

Upcoming Exhibitions:
2017 LA Art Show, Los Angeles, USA
2017 Art Palm Beach, Florida, USA
2017 Art Boca Raton, Florida, USA
2017 Artist In Residency, Beijing, China
2017 ‘Waking / 苏醒’ Solo Exhibition, Being 3 Gallery, Beijing, China
2017 Art Southampton, NY, USA
2017 Finlayson Art Centre, B&RAP, Finland
2017 Basel Art Center, B&RAP, Basel, Switzerland
2018 Xian Art Museum, Xian, B&RAP, China

www.canaljagerroos.com

“Imagination: The Creative Force of Life”


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Imagination: The Spirit of Sophia held “ The Creative Force of Life” at the Women’s Foundation’s Hopscotch House in Prospect, Kentucky today, Earth Day, April 22. Artist Joan Zehnder was our guide today as we wrote and made art about what we each individually have to offer the world. We then combined our writing and art in groups to create new worlds. What a meaningful, enriching, empowering and exhilarating experience. And what fun too! Perfect for a rainy Earth Day…..

 

 

Top left: Imagination participant Andria Creighton  contemplates her group’s creation. Top right: Going for a three-d effect here in this Imagination group effort. Bottom: Some thoughts of a participant.  2nd right:  Director and founder of Spirit of Sophia Dana Sue Walker writing and reflecting on her group’s New World Imagination group art.

 

 

Top left:  This is the lovely sitting room in the Hopscotch house provided by the Woman’s Foundation of Louisville, founded by Sally Bingham for the enrichment, advancement and enlightenment of women throughout the country. Top right: Another group contemplates their group creation. Bottom right: No matter which direction you look at it, this piece’s rich organic structure enhances the many gifts of all the women in this group.

 

Another Imagination group’s creative effort.

The entire Imagination experience was a high point of the week and a perfect way to celebrate Earth  Day, all enthusiastic participant agreed.

Birds Inspire 


 

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Today is a beautiful, sunny day, and the air is warming just slightly. Looking for inspiration, I often turn to nature as a most reliable source. Today’s focus is birds and flight, representing the power of the soaring spirit, indomitable and ever uplifting. What a blessing to hear the flutters and chirps outside my window. It gives me renewed determination to appreciate and preserve our natural environment.

Starting with a selection of bird paintings by artist Paul Klee, and one to honor Paul Klee, above, we move through a variety of media and artistic approaches.

Interwoven in this feature are bird sculptures and paintings/drawings I found everywhere.   I hope you enjoy their whimsy, movement and beauty today. I hope that a focus on inspiration and hope conveys the asssurance that we are so much more than a consumer culture repleat with an eternal quest for power and domination.

 

Check  out this poem by for a riveting summation and warning of how our culture could look to outsiders from the future.  This excerpt presents a perceptive view of a predominant movement in today’s culture.

This slim book of poetry — Mary Oliver’s Red Bird contains many wonderful poems. Here are A few lines of “Of the Empire”

We will be known as a culture that feared death
and adored power, that tried to vanquish insecurity
for the few and cared little for the penury of the
many. We will be known as a culture that taught
and rewarded the amassing of things, that spoke
little if at all about the quality of life for
people (other people), for dogs, for rivers. All
the world in our eyes, they will say, was a
commodity. And they will say that this structure
was held together politically, which it was, and
they will say also that our politics was no more
than an apparatus to accommodate the feelings of
the heart, and that the heart, in those days,
was small, and hard, and full of meanness.

 

 

And yet, Art can provide a reminder that our hearts and souls are larger, more compassionate than the metallic noise and dissection surrounding us now.  Compassion, insight and courage are still valued, still appreciated, still embodied by our culture at large.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


https://credmayne.com/2017/03/11/come-to-mama/1975-come-to-mama/

Collector’s Choice: Jane Davies’ New Exhibion


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Submerge yourself into a sea of dynamic visual poetry by abstract painting master Jane Davies. In Janes’s paintings, the world is true to nature in form and integrity. Images embrace the viewer with harmonious discourse of color, shape, line, texture and pattern, all orchestrated with an instinctual genius for proportion, movement and intuitive balance.

Take some time  to pull yourself away from today’s political world upheavals if only for a few moments. Change the scenery. Replace your television  with  these paintings by Jane Davies.

Change your life by changing your scenery .  Gaze at these amazing paintings. Change the world by changing the scenery in front of your eyes. You can change the world, beginning with your own world. And that is always the best place to start.

Let these paintings enter your vision and dance in your soul.

Written by Jan Kirstein, Painter

 

 

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Edgewater Gallery: “I have new framed pieces up at Edgewater Gallery in Middlebury, VT.,” says Jane Davies. “If you’re in the area I hope you’ll stop by. You can also purchase from their website, Take a look.

 

 

 

 

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JANE DAVIES
PAINTING + MIXED MEDIA
ARTIST STATEMENT

Formal elements are my first and foremost source of inspiration. I can be moved by a simple combination of color and line, or the relationships of shapes and edges, or the interplay between pattern and scale. I look at colors, textures and images out in the world as well: rocks, rust, surfaces affected by age, by marks of the human hand, by time and tides. But I also look at a lot of art in many mediums, and gorge myself on the infinite ways in which materials can be transformed into rich and expressive visual statements.
In my own art practice, focus on process is an essential component of developing work that feels authentic and personal. My process involves a back-and-forth play between spontaneous, intuitive mark-making, and careful deliberation and intention: I think of it as letting things happen, and making things happen. I make a move, and then the painting reveals something new to respond to. Each move changes the whole piece and sets up a new set of challenges. It takes practice and continued effort to stay present to this dialog and not get carried away by the desire for a quick result or an easy resolution. It requires trust in my own intuitive responses, and a willingness to not-know, to not have the route laid out like a road map.

 

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http://edgewatergallery.co/artists/jane-davies/

 

Visit Jane’s website:  http://www.janedaviesartgallery.com

 

Coming soon by Jane Davies:
New 100 Drawings: Starting October 4, 2017 – 10 interactive sessions online, find out more and register here.

 

 

 

On a more politically proactive note….Pink Postcards

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for viewing  the .KIRSTEINFINEART BLOG

 

The World is Upside Down!


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I just wanted to alert you to my free book on Amazon. Dec 22-26 2016!  Just  just click here to get your free copy!

 

5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed By Emily-Jane Hills Orford for Readers’ Favorite

Vortex is an anteater; Scoop is a lioness. What’s unusual about the two is not that Vortex likes to count how many ants he eats each day, or that Scoop likes to measure how fast she runs because she’s the fastest runner in the jungle. What’s unusual is that Vortex the anteater and Scoop the lioness were born together, attached at the shoulder and torso. Vortex and Scoop are one, even though they’re also two different animals. And this has become a problem. While Vortex wants to eat all the ants he can, Scoop wants to run as fast as she can, so neither one is happy with how the other goes about their business. So, what do they do? Do they seek surgical separation? Or do they learn to accommodate each other and live together in harmony?

Author and artist Janis Adrian Kirstein has written a charming, fantastical story in Fantasy Animals (Volume 1), complete with her own illustrations. The story reads like a treasured parable, a storyteller’s treat that also teaches valuable lessons. In this case, the lessons to be learned are about understanding, cooperating, resolving differences, and learning to live together without conflict in spite of differences. Everyone is born different, unique, and we all must learn to respect these differences, not criticize them. Vortex and Scoop had to learn how to negotiate, how to find something good in each other, and how to make allowances for the other’s differences. These are important lessons for all of us, young and old, to learn over and over again. A great story to share many times.

 

If you read this book and feel so moved, please feel free to write a review on my Amazon author page!

 

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