Happy Halloween! The Ultimate ART DAY!


 

 

Two art students at Western Hills High School produce their Halloween interpretation of “Monster.”

watercolor-monster
Painting by Julia Martinez, Sophomore at Western Hills High School

 

 

sterling-monster
Painting by Stirling Crawford, Junior, Western Hills High School

 

 

 

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Stirling speaks with his hand….
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Costume Day at Western Hills, with Cheech of Cheech and Chong, and an angel.

Monster Project:  For High School Level Students

 

Create a Monster                             Kirstein

 

Objective: Design a symbolic portrait of a “monster,” using symbols to convey the monster’s inner and outer personality, affinities and tendencies. You can use collage, pencil, colored pencil, marker or paint, and you must cover your whole sheet of paper with an environment for the monster.

 

 

Your monster does not have to be realistic or look like a person, but  it must include:

  • A monster figure, whether drawn, painted, or created with glued collage magazine pieces.

2) Use entire sheet of paper.

3) Use proportion to create a sense of the unusual and to create emphasis and balance. Create variety and harmony through the use of color, shape and value.

4) Monster needs to convery personality and the environment needs to surround it with symbols pertaining to the likes and dislikes of this monster you have created.

 

How to proceed:

Step 1: Draw your monster on a piece of 12” x 18”  white paper to formulate and brainstorm your design. On this paper, decide how the main figure will look, and how you will arrange the objects in your drawing.

Step two: Draw main figure and symbols with pencil.

Step three: Use prisma colored pencils or regular colored pencils for the color. You may also use tempra paint, water color or magic marker. Magazine collage is also encouraged. You may also glue in words that relate to the monster.

 

clown
“Clown” painted by Blaze Paul, Freshman Western Hills High School

Scale I: Focus

Project completed

Student followed directions/classroom rules

Student made effort to meet objectives and goals

Work completed on time

Effort/attitude

 

Scale II: Craftsmanship/Technique

Craftsmanship is aptitude, skill, manual dexterity in use of media and tools.

Technique is manner and skill with which the artist employs the tools/materials to

achieve the chosen effect.

Criteria:

Skillful use of media

Care taken with project

Work area cleaned daily

Media used with correct technique

Technical skill in the use of media

Visual detail (neatness)

Appropriate use of supplies and materials

Skillful and appropriate use of materials

 

Assessment:

 

4  Assignment on time; meets or exceeds all criteria.

3  Assignment on time with one criterion missing.

2  Assignment on time but has two criteria missing.

  • Assignment late or has three or four criteria missing.
  • Assignment late or has inappropriate solution to the problem, incomplete

 

lion
“Lion Monster” by Hala Jordon, Junior, Western Hills High School

Josephine Sculpture Park in Frankfort, Kentucky


josephinesculpturepark.org

Best Field Trip Ever! Western Hills High School Art students all agreed. The trip to Josephine Sculpture Park in Frankfort, Kentucky was the best field trip they ever went on since Junior High!

Artist and owner of the Sculpture Park, Melanie Van Houten gave a moving and insightful tour to my students, encouraging art students to do what they want in their lives, to build their lives within a box without a ceiling of restrictions.

 

 

 

 

She he started her sculpture garden after receiving her Master of Fine Arts at University of Minnesota and teaching there as a professor of sculpture for six years.  She then returned to her native home state and created this sculpture garden on the farm that was once her beloved grandmothers. Melanie spent many joyful years growing up on this farm and recalls many happy days enjoying the farm’s natural wonders.

 

 

 

Beginning from “scratch,” Melanie built her park by tirelessly writing grants, and taking small steps each year to build the beautiful park into a substantial collection of contemporary sculpture pieces from all over the country. The Park also includes a multitude of community festivals, plays, art lessons, tours, and many other community contributions throughout the year.

 

Josephine Sculpture Park is a tribute to the Creative Arts, to the Building of Community, and to the preservation and value of the earth. Frankfort is indeed very lucky to have such a rich cultural resource right in its very midst.

 

Below: A sculpture in poured iron by Melanie Van Houten made at the University of Minnesota.

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The art students from Western Hills’ Fashion Design Class give a responding thanks to Melanie Van Houten for providing such an amazing resource for expanding their Fine Arts awareness! Many thanks to Melanie Van Houten!

Written by Janis Kirstein

Collector’s Choice: Shelley S. Davies


imagewww.shelleysdavies.com

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Click on thumbnails to enlarge

 

Art to Zucchini and Everything in Between
I’m an illustrator who lives beside the sea on the west coast of Canada with my family and an imaginary dog. Sometimes two. I have a background in animation, film and graphic design. I also love to take photographs, which gets me away from my desk with all those teeny, tiny bits of paper!

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I’m a Canadian artist living by the sea on Vancouver Island, creating paintings, collages, and photographs that are bold and colour-infused. All my work, aside from the photography, is proudly handmade with scissors, glue and paint; many with 3-dimensional aspects.

 

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With a background in animation, feature films, television and theatre, my many creative pursuits have led me to the joys of illustration. Colour, wit and a good dose of play are what I aim for, using collage, paint and a strong graphic design sensibility. For the past ten years, I’ve contributed illustrations to numerous magazines and newspapers on a regular basis with editorial, fashion and botanical themes, while my heart still belongs to children’s illustration.

 

 

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I’ve created a line of greeting cards, which you can find at my Etsy shop, and I’m delighted to be creating an ongoing series of photo-collaged jigsaw puzzles for Cobble Hill Puzzles/Outset Media. I also write the blog ‘Children’s Illustration‘ with author/illustrator extraordinaire Julie Fortenberry. You can find all my social media sites at the top of my home page, and my Instagram page has all my daily photographs.

Collector’s Choice: Shelley Davies


www.shelleydavies.co.uk


The artist

Shelley was born in east London, daughter to a jazz trumpeter and a tap-dancer. One of four sisters, she regularly skipped school to draw and paint in the local forest, understanding at an early age the relevance of both art and the great outdoors to her future life.

She studied for four years in London, at Camberwell School of Art, undertaking a painting commission for The London Palace Theatre while a student, and receiving a Crafts Council Graduate award in her first job as assistant designer/maker for John Hinchcliffe, carrying out design contracts for Saks New York, Selfridges and Habitat.

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Moving on to work as a designer and stylist for several West End companies, notably Courtaulds, Pomme and Christy’s, she began to develop her own practice as a designer/maker, working to commission and exhibiting across southern England.

Alongside her own creative practice, Shelley became involved in working with young people interested in the arts, co-ordinating an inspirational project in West Sussex involving music, writing and the visual arts, then moved on to working motivationally with adults.

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The arrival of children saw a change in direction, pure painting and drawing became more significant and in addition, experiments with clay began to take shape as a complement to the two-dimensional work.

Her work now reflects both the presence and absence of tranquility in her life – she experiments with the play of light and shade, the beauty of line and, through ceramics, the complexity of surface pattern, her subject matter extending from European urban and rural landscapes to still life and figure studies. Future work will see a move towards further unifying these eclectic influences.

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Now Shelley works from her two studios in Bristol, is a member of Jamaica Street Artists, North Bristol Artists and Bristol Fringe, has exhibited at the RWA and continues exhibiting as widely as family demands allow, showing work in London, France and the south-west of England.

She works increasingly to commission and also takes part in several community projects which provide her with the stimulus she required to continue enjoying and developing her work.

Some of her projects also include:

Lighting Up – Art for people suffering from people with Alzheimers, Bristol

Art in the Park – Annual Bristol children’s community art exhibition

Colston’s School Mosaic – a whole-school installation to celebrate the abolition of Bristol’s slave trade