Love These Paintings by Hildy Maze


“None of us can escape the habit of projecting thoughts and concepts onto reality itself…” Artist Hildy Maze

https://hildymaze.com

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I never get tired of looking at collages by Hildy Maze, a painter working from her Long Island art studio. What an inspiration! Just the right touch of shape, color and texture to bring about a change of consciousness.

 

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Do not be deceived by the seemly random marks and sporadic pigment impacts upon the page. These statements of line and color are the essential dynamics of a well orchestrated capture of life’s very essence.

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Folded, bent, pushed, scraped, painted, drawn, pressed, mashed, turned, twisted, toppled and compressed, these paintings have been through it. The process exposes the revelation, much as a lifetime journey reveals the core ideas, to those who are seeking.

 

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Accidental markings merge with bold intentions from the artist to express a state of mind both fleeting and lingering.

 

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Embrace the state of mind and then let it go.

 

Discoveries in 20th Century Expressionism


Have you ever seen these abstract works of art before? These pieces are all from the Yale University Art Gallery. Have a look!

Piede Vicentino (Vicentine Foot), from the series Codex Coner

The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States, a joint initiative of the Trustees of the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection and the National Gallery of Art, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Institute for Museum and Library Services
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From the exhibition Many Things Placed Here and There: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection at the Yale University Art Gallery:

Though Herbert Vogel knew Michael Goldberg from the 1950s New York art scene, the Vogels did not begin acquiring Goldberg’s work until the 1970s, at which point the couple bought work directly from the art­ist’s studio in the Bowery. Goldberg experimented with dynamic gesture, vibrant color, and emotionally charged abstraction, all defining characteristics of Abstract Expressionism, which swept through New York after the Second World War. In Piede Vicentino, broad, bold brushstrokes and strong diagonals infuse the work with pervasive energy. The title of the series from which this work comes is taken from an early sixteenth-century album created by a Florentine architect, and famously copied by Michelangelo, that illustrates details of Roman buildings.

 

 

Continue reading “Discoveries in 20th Century Expressionism”

Getty Museum’s Open Content project makes 4,600 pieces of art freely available to download


 

 

Much of the world’s great artwork is tightly controlled, but the Getty Museum just announced a significant initiative to open things up — its new Open Content Program has made some 4,600 pieces of art from the museum’s collection free to use. Users can visit the Getty Search Gateway to browse through the entire collection of high-resolution images, and they can all be used for commercial and non-commercial purposes so long as they’re properly attributed to the museum. When downloading an image, the site also asks for you to share why you’re using it — so the museum can see why people are downloading its content.

Amongst the many freely available pieces of art released by Getty are a number of quite famous images, including work by Claude Monet, Vincent van Gogh, Rembrandt, and Leonardo da Vinci.  The 4,600 pieces of artwork available are just the beginning, as well. Getty says that it’s actively exploring the possibility of releasing much more art into the public domain, both from the museum’s collection as well as materials from the Getty Research Institute’s special collections. While Getty isn’t the first museum to push forward with an open artwork initiative (the museum cited a number of institutions like the Walters Art Museum as inspirations for the movement), it’s the latest example of how the internet is making classic, famous works more accessible.

Image credit:

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853 – 1890)
Irises, 1889, Oil on canvas
Unframed: 71.1 x 93 cm (28 x 36 5/8 in.)
Framed: 95.3 x 115.6 x 7.9 cm (37 1/2 x 45 1/2 x 3 1/8 in.)
The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

OTHER FAMOUS WORKS OF INTEREST

Leonardo da Vinci (Italian, 1452 – 1519), Caricature of a Man with Bushy Hair, Italian, about 1495, Pen and brown ink, 6.6 x 5.4 cm (2 5/8 x 2 1/8 in.)

Jean-François Millet (French, 1814 – 1875), Man with a Hoe, French, 1860 – 1862, Oil on canvas, 81.9 × 100.3 cm (32 1/4 × 39 1/2 in.)

Paul Cézanne (French, 1839 – 1906), Young Italian Woman at a Table, French, about 1895 – 1900, Oil on canvas, 92.1 × 73.5 cm (36 1/4 × 28 15/16 in.)

Théodore Géricault (French, 1791 – 1824), The Race of the Riderless Horses, French, 1817, Oil and pen and ink on paper laid on canvas, 19.8 × 29.1 cm (7 13/16 × 11 7/16 in.),

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853 – 1890), Portrait of Joseph Roulin, Dutch, 1888, Reed and quill pen and brown ink, over black chalk, 32.1 × 24.4 cm (12 5/8 × 9 5/8 in.)

Permission to Create Continues the Journey


Painting and sharing in the new web site format Studio Journey, with our artist guide Nancy Hillis, brings the fulfillment of granting the permission to create, for many knowledgeable painters from all over the world. Nancy Hillis is an inspiring painter, teacher and medical doctor who brings us all together through the website to share her projects, resulting in the creation of art work and feedback from one another.

Thank you Nancy for leading our inspiring journey, which has just begun.

Jan Kirstein

Photo courtesy of Pascal

Check out her website to see more about Nancy and her Art Journey at https://nancyhillis.com

As a beginning, our first intention was to work in a series, encouraging experimentation within a framework of self imposed limitations. Some artists chose limited color range, some chose exploring art mark making. An amazing outpouring of creative production rose from this first task, generating a wide range of very well informed results. I hope to share some of these with you after I gain artist permission for the use of their works in my blog.

For now, I share with you the paintings I have created on this Journey so far. I lost my studio about a month ago and this program gave me the impetus to resume painting again. For that, I am indeed very grateful.

The artist’s hand.