You’ll love this idea!


 

 

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Hi everyone!

First, I want to let you know that I am getting ready to feature more awesome, creative fine artist painters in the very near future, but I have been recently sick. I think I’m finally getting better because today I had the strength to plant some herbs and flowers. A very God sign (I meant to type good, but God works just as well) ,  I think!

In the meanwhile, I wanted to share my new line of mix and match “Circus Buddies” items to delight your Inner Child! I am opening up a Shopify outlet on my Facebook page Kirsteinfineart in 5 days, but you can get your items at a discount early  click   here.

Browse the collection, and let me know if you have a favorite! If you choose to click the above link, it will take you directly to my manufacturing outlet Fineartamerica. Here is how it works. Click on an image you prefer in all Circus Buddies images. Then look to the right for a menu of all the various items. You will see many choices: pillows, duvet covers, shower curtains, prints, posters, cards, totes, beach towels, etc.

Have fun “shopping” with my Circus Buddies!

I hope to be back in gear in a few more days, so can get out some more artist features! Meanwhile, enjoy your summer!

 

Jan Kirstein

Click on these thumbnails to enlarge.

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Lee Brewster: To Capture a Moment in Time


 

 

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If an artist can capture a moment in a lightening strike of eloquently drawn lines and painted strokes of pigment, then why do so many artists feel it is necessary to overlabor over creating ? Is a rendition of the moment with dutiful work ethic, and a heavy sense of responsibility always more valuable than a direct moment of complete insight?

By viewing paintings by  Lee Brewster, one can see that it is entirely possible for  an artist to perfectly align with the universe in a delightful harmony, and capture this moment of spontaneous truth. When this happens, you have a major miracle.

This is the work of painter Lee Brewster, who’s baby steps capture the larger heart and soul of reality in a most certain, profound and complete way.

Jan Kirstein

 

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“today in the studio I had one of those sacred moments. it brought me back to why I love art-making & came when I added a thin layer of white to parts of this little paper piece. I can’t say that it’s done, but it is much improved by what was added today. this piece has been sitting in my studio…waiting. i never gave up on it when it was ugly & awkward, because I saw something worth saving in it compositionally. i love the messiness (or mistakes, if you choose to call them that) from the past & that you can still see shadows of them. mostly I love what I learned about life: that for all those times when I didn’t look like much, someone saw something in me worth keeping around & investing in. someone had a vision for what I would become. so…this little piece of paper with black & white marks on it was my teacher today. she’s is imperfectly beautiful & wise & worthy and I’m calling her “grace”

Lee Brewster

Artist

Franklin, TN.

 

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Arturo Pacheco Lugo : A Statement of Presence


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“In the beginning of painting is a struggling soul,

thus painting is a phenomenon of the soul.

The work must redeem a passionate soul.

In a poetic image, the soul states its presence.”

G. Bachelard.

 

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To look at a painting by Lugo is like sifting through an archeological dig, moving through layer upon layer of earth.  Barely recognizable forms emerge into a conscious gestalt where meanings galvanize through the viewer’s own personal references and connections.

Jan Kirstein

 

 

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Arturo Pacheco Lugo was born in the city of Puebla, Mexico on November 12, 1961.

He studied fine arts in the workshops of painters Jose Luis Hernandez and Sando Berger during the early years of his formation as an artist.

 

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Lugo uses experimental techniques, materials and creative processes and aesthetic applications and has had numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout his artistic life.  His works are sought after by collectors worldwide.

 

 

 

 

Christine Verhaert: Painter of Converging Forces


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Paintings  by Christina Verhaert sing with a depth of emotion and a height of lucidity. Line moves gracefully through the white space of the paper’s surface,  ingiting a feeling of peaceful freedom. In contrast, layers of dense pigment churn with storms of passion and layered complexities, all to create a capture of the tenuous balance of life’s many converging forces.

Jan Kirstein

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Verhaert’ paintings call to mind a poem by Percey Bysshe Shelley

Ode To The West Wind – Poem by Percy Bysshe Shelley

I

O  West Wind, thou breath of Autumn’s being,
Thou, from whose unseen presence the leaves dead
Are driven, like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing,

Yellow, and black, and pale, and hectic red,
Pestilence-stricken multitudes: O thou,
Who chariotest to their dark wintry bed

The winged seeds, where they lie cold and low,
Each like a corpse within its grave, until
Thine azure sister of the Spring shall blow

Her clarion o’er the dreaming earth, and fill
(Driving sweet buds like flocks to feed in air)
With living hues and odors plain and hill:

Wild Spirit, which art moving everywhere;
Destroyer and preserver; hear, oh, hear!

II

Thou on whose stream, ‘mid the steep sky’s commotion,
Loose clouds like earth’s decaying leaves are shed,
Shook from the tangled boughs of Heaven and Ocean,

Angels of rain and lightning: there are spread
On the blue surface of thine aery surge,
Like the bright hair uplifted from the head

Of some fierce Maenad, even from the dim verge
Of the horizon to the zenith’s height,
The locks of the approaching storm. Thou dirge

Of the dying year, to which this closing night
Will be the dome of a vast sepulchre,
Vaulted with all thy congregated might

Of vapors, from whose solid atmosphere
Black rain, and fire, and hail will burst: oh, hear!

III

Thou who didst waken from his summer dreams
The blue Mediterranean, where he lay,
Lulled by the coil of his crystalline streams,

Beside a pumice isle in Baiae’s bay,
And saw in sleep old palaces and towers
Quivering within the wave’s intenser day,

All overgrown with azure moss and flowers
So sweet, the sense faints picturing them! Thou
For whose path the Atlantic’s level powers

Cleave themselves into chasms, while far below
The sea-blooms and the oozy woods which wear
The sapless foliage of the ocean, know

Thy voice, and suddenly grow gray with fear,
And tremble and despoil themselves: oh, hear!

IV

If I were a dead leaf thou mightest bear;
If I were a swift cloud to fly with thee;
A wave to pant beneath thy power, and share

The impulse of thy strength, only less free
Than thou, O uncontrollable! If even
I were as in my boyhood, and could be

The comrade of thy wanderings over Heaven,
As then, when to outstrip thy skiey speed
Scarce seemed a vision; I would ne’er have striven

As thus with thee in prayer in my sore need.
Oh, lift me as a wave, a leaf, a cloud!
I fall upon the thorns of life! I bleed!

A heavy weight of hours has chained and bowed
One too like thee: tameless, and swift, and proud.

V

Make me thy lyre, even as the forest is:
What if my leaves are falling like its own!
The tumult of thy mighty harmonies

Will take from both a deep, autumnal tone,
Sweet though in sadness. Be thou, Spirit fierce,
My spirit! Be thou me, impetuous one!

Drive my dead thoughts over the universe
Like withered leaves to quicken a new birth!
And, by the incantation of this verse,

Scatter, as from an unextinguished hearth
Ashes and sparks, my words among mankind!
Be through my lips to unawakened earth

The trumpet of a prophecy! O Wind,
If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind?
Percy Bysshe Shelley

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Christina Verhaert is a painter living in Brecht, Belgium.

Nava Waxman as Shape Shifter


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Nava Waxman gracefully dances the fine interstitial line between becoming and being. She captures the manifestation of painting as a performance of the human spirit made manifest in paint.

Jan Kirstein

 

Written by Nikos Kount Littérateur

Untitled Wall is Nava Waxman’s interdisciplinary work, featuring a series of studio performances, from her extensive archive material spanning over the past three years to the more recent pieces.
It is an organic and visceral practice, as she is dealing with the concepts of metaphors and allegories which construct her performances and her ongoing research on how to portray situations that are comprised of various elements such as painting, objects, space and her body gestures.

 

 

 

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Her work does not acquiesce in an obvious self- representation and beyond her perspective as the creator with the physical presence in the process, she does not consider her oeuvre as completely autobiographical.
Waxman’s aesthetics are referential and by the use of classic art media in combination with New ones, she transform her ideas into a ritualistic Theatre. She conserves in her editing process a continuation of things past gone and of things yet to come. The essence of these junctions and additions influences how each of her artistic materials and techniques relates to each other. Thinking within the framework of object-making, her dilemma and principal focus is how to form an Image both expressively and critically charged while engaging with concepts around experience and representation.

 

 

Nava Waxman addresses and questions the traditional method of painting and whilst she deconstructs it, at the same time raises the task of painting to a coalescence of references; from the research and study of Art History to the factual and mythological and other fields such as Literature and Music.
The core of her practice and performances resides in the task of painting on her studio wall. The Wall has been painted over and over again with ephemeral paintings that resonate with the fluid time and space. Traces of paint, lines and faded images are there so as to be merged into something new. Her methods of painting transform the Wall into a Live Ephemeral Palimpsest that constantly changes. The narration of this exhibition is multileveled and concentric.

 

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The context of examining the relationship between performance and visual art lies in the origin of the vast documentations material, since from the very beginning she used photography in order to capture the creation of the artwork as an Art as well. It is a celebratory continuous discovery and illumination of the action after its genesis. The combination of Technics and Time or as Roland Barthes wrote: A sort of umbilical cord links the body of the photographed thing to my gaze: “light though impalpable, is here a carnal medium, a skin I share with anyone who has been photographed.”
The transitory nature and duration of the imagery coincides with her evolution as a painter. She is aware of the fact that the produced work will only last for a limited period of time. Capturing the random, the magical, the thoughts and the feelings made this wholeness tangible. In a way it is a struggle; Painting versus Painted.
These works assemble and at the same time epitomize this ever changing act of looking and most importantly her Solitary monologues, which have only ever taken place in the privacy and isolation of her studio. This exhibition marks the public nature and premiere of these series.

 

 

According to Nava, Life is an accumulative formation and this resonates with her painted wall or the covered up paintings. The Untitled Wall stands as a monument of Now, where time, space and feelings are interconnected and the way we perceive the momentum or the future is eminently affixed to our retention of the past.
The photographic sequences are offering an access to the artist’s inspirations and how they are transformed into a perpetual reminiscence of the collective memory. The associations and the situations established through her performances allow an open and unconditional platform for the beholder to experience.

 

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“In this modern era when everything has existed in the past, images are disposable and the meanings misinterpreted, Nava Waxman’s endeavor is to question these circumstances and reconstruct the [ definition of ] Vision.”

Written by Nikos Kount Littérateur

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Nava Waxman is a Toronto-based artist whose work ranges from drawing, painting, and objects to performance and photography.
Born in Israel (1974), she studied painting and drawing at the Toronto School Of Art and received her BA in social science and communications from Open University in Tel-Aviv.
Nava has exhibited in national and international shows and her work has been featured in numerous publications and is held in public and private collections.
She has been the recipient of the Canada Council of the art Travel grant as well as the Exhibition Assistance Grant from the Ontario Art Council. She lives and works in Toronto.

 

LINGMU MEIZHI: In Touch with the Inner Child


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Here you see the mystery artist of the day that I have found. Does ANYONE know anything about her? I believe her name is LINGMU MEIZHI and that she is Japanese.

 

I found her work on a website called imgrum.org.

She paints and draws with complete necessity.  No mark is out of place. Every scrape, dot and brush stroke is immediate, spontaneous, yet absolutely necessary to the whole image.

Every part of the image is in complete harmony and balance with all other marks in the work.   Yet within each image is such a wide range of diversity, from light to heavy, from bold to delicate, from rough to smooth, from transparent to thickly opaque.

What a lesson in coexistence and diversity these paintings bring. And each image looks as though it leaped directly from the artist’s soul straight onto the paper!

What do you think? Let me know!

Jan Kirstein

 

 

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Collector’s Choice: Sigal Ron


 

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Sigal Ron

“I see myself as an abstract painter who enjoys freedom of expression.
However, we are all like ‘ swallows sitting on the wire of tradition,’ so from time to time I sin by creating objective art for feeling a communication with a greater public.  I adore every manifestation of visual art and enjoy crossing over and going back with the passion of a child who has gotten a new toy. I am grateful for every moment I can paint.”

Written by Zichron Jaacov Israel

 

 

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Sigal Ron is a painter who walks the fine line between completely non-objective painting and figurative painting with equal ease and grace. She  commands both sides of that artistic differentiation with prowess and inevitability.  Her non-objective paintings rush at us with volumes of hurtling textures, colors and glimmering light. Her figurative works walk with prowess all the way from realistic representation through graphic depiction to sighs of abbreviated yet essential abstractions. Her painterly touch is comprised of deft command, searing insight and relentlessly well timed orchestration. Bravo Sigal Ron! My hat is off to you!

Jan Kirstein

 

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Recent Exhibitions:

“GilArte” Gallery —Zichron Jaacov 2011

“Gam Gallery”—Tel Aviv 2011

“Gebo” Gallery—Tel Aviv 2012

International Exhibition of Art –Matera- Italy 2015

2nd International Bienalle of Art in Palermo 2014

4 International Abstract exhibition in Moscow 2015

2015 – Moscow “Gold collection of Abstract

Bienalle of Drawing Osten Museum – Skopje 2016

Museo Palazzo Farnese-International Exhibitin of Contemporary Art Juni 2016

Art for Peace- Museo Palazzo Farnese Ortona. Italy 2016

Gallery of Contemporary Art-Kazan-Russia

Juni 2016

Poligious Issues-Schiedam-Netherlands 2017

 

 

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Birds Inspire 


 

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Today is a beautiful, sunny day, and the air is warming just slightly. Looking for inspiration, I often turn to nature as a most reliable source. Today’s focus is birds and flight, representing the power of the soaring spirit, indomitable and ever uplifting. What a blessing to hear the flutters and chirps outside my window. It gives me renewed determination to appreciate and preserve our natural environment.

Starting with a selection of bird paintings by artist Paul Klee, and one to honor Paul Klee, above, we move through a variety of media and artistic approaches.

Interwoven in this feature are bird sculptures and paintings/drawings I found everywhere.   I hope you enjoy their whimsy, movement and beauty today. I hope that a focus on inspiration and hope conveys the asssurance that we are so much more than a consumer culture repleat with an eternal quest for power and domination.

 

Check  out this poem by for a riveting summation and warning of how our culture could look to outsiders from the future.  This excerpt presents a perceptive view of a predominant movement in today’s culture.

This slim book of poetry — Mary Oliver’s Red Bird contains many wonderful poems. Here are A few lines of “Of the Empire”

We will be known as a culture that feared death
and adored power, that tried to vanquish insecurity
for the few and cared little for the penury of the
many. We will be known as a culture that taught
and rewarded the amassing of things, that spoke
little if at all about the quality of life for
people (other people), for dogs, for rivers. All
the world in our eyes, they will say, was a
commodity. And they will say that this structure
was held together politically, which it was, and
they will say also that our politics was no more
than an apparatus to accommodate the feelings of
the heart, and that the heart, in those days,
was small, and hard, and full of meanness.

 

 

And yet, Art can provide a reminder that our hearts and souls are larger, more compassionate than the metallic noise and dissection surrounding us now.  Compassion, insight and courage are still valued, still appreciated, still embodied by our culture at large.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


https://credmayne.com/2017/03/11/come-to-mama/1975-come-to-mama/

Collector’s Choice: Marc Chagall


 

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Marc Chagall (French, born Russia – present-day Belarus; 1887-1985): Carmen, 1966. Lithograph. Image size: 39-1/2 x 25-11/16 inches (100.5 x 65.3 cm). Created in 1966 from a maquette for Chagall’s “Triumph of Music,” a series of 3 large-scale decorations created for the Metropolitan Opera House in New York (Carmen, The Magic Flute, Romeo and Juliet). © Marc Chagall.

‘Chagall created this piece for the opera “Carmen” by George Bizet upon its opening at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. The print is a small detail from a preliminary painting of Chagall’s much larger “The Triumph of Music”, which now hangs at the Metropolitan Opera.’

“Chagall: Midsummer Night’s Dreams”
Through January 8, 2017
Carrières de Lumières, Les Baux de Provence, France
http://bit.ly/2heyQmy

Exhibition:
“Winter Exhibition 2016”
Until February 15, 2017
Gilden’s Art Gallery, London

Thanks to:  #IRequireArt @irequireart #art

 

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Born Moishe Shagal
6 July 1887 (N.S.)
Liozna, near Vitebsk, Russian Empire (present-day Belarus)
Died 28 March 1985 (aged 97)
Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France
Nationality Russian, later French
Known for Painting stained glass
Movement :  Cubism Expressionism

 
Marc Zakharovich Chagall (/ʃəˈɡɑːl/ shə-gahl,  6 July [O.S. 24 June] 1887 – 28 March 1985) was a Russian-French artist. An early modernist, he was associated with several major artistic styles and created works in virtually every artistic format, including painting, book illustrations, stained glass, stage sets, ceramic, tapestries and fine art prints.

Art critic Robert Hughes referred to Chagall as “the quintessential Jewish artist of the twentieth century” (though Chagall saw his work as “not the dream of one people but of all humanity”). According to art historian Michael J. Lewis, Chagall was considered to be “the last survivor of the first generation of European modernists”. For decades, he “had also been respected as the world’s preeminent Jewish artist”. Using the medium of stained glass, he produced windows for the cathedrals of Reims and Metz, windows for the UN, and the Jerusalem Windows in Israel. He also did large-scale paintings, including part of the ceiling of the Paris Opéra.

Before World War I, he traveled between St. Petersburg, Paris, and Berlin. During this period he created his own mixture and style of modern art based on his idea of Eastern European Jewish folk culture. He spent the wartime years in Soviet Belarus, becoming one of the country’s most distinguished artists and a member of the modernist avant-garde, founding the Vitebsk Arts College before leaving again for Paris in 1922.

He had two basic reputations, writes Lewis: as a pioneer of modernism and as a major Jewish artist. He experienced modernism’s “golden age” in Paris, where “he synthesized the art forms of Cubism, Symbolism, and Fauvism, and the influence of Fauvism gave rise to Surrealism.”  Yet throughout these phases of his style “he remained most emphatically a Jewish artist, whose work was one long dreamy reverie of life in his native village of Vitebsk.”

“When Matisse dies,” Pablo Picasso remarked in the 1950s, “Chagall will be the only painter left who understands what colour really is.”

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Marc Chagall

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Jean Michel Basquiat


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QUICK FACTS

NAME
Jean-Michel Basquiat
OCCUPATION
Painter
BIRTH DATE
December 22, 1960
DEATH DATE
August 12, 1988
PLACE OF BIRTH
Brooklyn, New York
PLACE OF DEATH
New York, New York
NICKNAME
“SAMO”

Jean-Michel Basquiat was a Neo-Expressionist painter in the 1980s. He is best known for his primitive style and his collaboration with pop artist Andy Warhol.

Synopsis

Jean-Michel Basquiat was born on December 22, 1960, in Brooklyn, New York. He first attracted attention for his graffiti under the name “SAMO” in New York City. He sold sweatshirts and postcards featuring his artwork on the streets before his painting career took off. He collaborated with Andy Warhol in the mid-1980s, which resulted in a show of their work. Basquiat died on August 12, 1988, in New York City.

 

Early Years

Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat was born in Brooklyn, New York, on December 22, 1960. With a Haitian-American father and a Puerto Rican mother, Basquiat’s diverse cultural heritage was one of his many sources of inspiration.

A self-taught artist, Basquiat began drawing at an early age on sheets of paper his father, an accountant, brought home from the office. As he delved deeper into his creative side, his mother strongly encouraged to pursue artistic talents.

Basquiat first attracted attention for his graffiti in New York City in the late 1970s, under the name “SAMO.” Working with a close friend, he tagged subway trains and Manhattan buildings with cryptic aphorisms.

In 1977, Basquiat quit high school a year before he was slated to graduate. To make ends meet, he sold sweatshirts and postcards featuring his artwork on the streets of his native New York.

Commercial Success

Three years of struggle gave way to fame in 1980, when his work was featured in a group show. His work and style received critical acclaim for the fusion of words, symbols, stick figures, and animals. Soon, his paintings came to be adored by an art loving public that had no problem paying as much as $50,000 for a Basquiat original.

His rise coincided with the emergence of a new art movement, Neo-Expressionism, ushering in a wave of new, young and experimental artists that included Julian Schnabel and Susan Rothenberg.

In the mid 1980s, Basquiat collaborated with famed pop artist Andy Warhol, which resulted in a show of their work that featured a series of corporate logos and cartoon characters.

On his own, Basquiat continued to exhibit around the country and the world. In 1986, he traveled to Africa for a show in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. That same year, the 25-year-old exhibited nearly 60 paintings at the Kestner-Gesellschaft Gallery in Hanover, Germany—becoming the youngest artist to ever showcase his work there.

Personal Problems

As his popularity soared, so did Basquiat’s personal problems. By the mid-1980s, friends became increasingly concerned by his excessive drug use. He became paranoid and isolated himself from the world around him for long stretches. Desperate to kick a heroin addiction, he left New York for Hawaii in 1988, returning a few months later and claiming to be sober.

Sadly, he wasn’t. Basquiat died of a drug overdose on August 12, 1988, in New York City. He was 27 years old. Although his art career was brief, Jean-Michel Basquiat has been credited with bringing the African-American and Latino experience in the elite art world.

Jean-Michel Basquiat Biography
Author

Biography.com Editors
Website Name

http://www.biography.com/people/jean-michel-basquiat-185851