Collector’s Choice: Sigal Ron


 

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Sigal Ron

“I see myself as an abstract painter who enjoys freedom of expression.
However, we are all like ‘ swallows sitting on the wire of tradition,’ so from time to time I sin by creating objective art for feeling a communication with a greater public.  I adore every manifestation of visual art and enjoy crossing over and going back with the passion of a child who has gotten a new toy. I am grateful for every moment I can paint.”

Written by Zichron Jaacov Israel

 

 

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Sigal Ron is a painter who walks the fine line between completely non-objective painting and figurative painting with equal ease and grace. She  commands both sides of that artistic differentiation with prowess and inevitability.  Her non-objective paintings rush at us with volumes of hurtling textures, colors and glimmering light. Her figurative works walk with prowess all the way from realistic representation through graphic depiction to sighs of abbreviated yet essential abstractions. Her painterly touch is comprised of deft command, searing insight and relentlessly well timed orchestration. Bravo Sigal Ron! My hat is off to you!

Jan Kirstein

 

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Recent Exhibitions:

“GilArte” Gallery —Zichron Jaacov 2011

“Gam Gallery”—Tel Aviv 2011

“Gebo” Gallery—Tel Aviv 2012

International Exhibition of Art –Matera- Italy 2015

2nd International Bienalle of Art in Palermo 2014

4 International Abstract exhibition in Moscow 2015

2015 – Moscow “Gold collection of Abstract

Bienalle of Drawing Osten Museum – Skopje 2016

Museo Palazzo Farnese-International Exhibitin of Contemporary Art Juni 2016

Art for Peace- Museo Palazzo Farnese Ortona. Italy 2016

Gallery of Contemporary Art-Kazan-Russia

Juni 2016

Poligious Issues-Schiedam-Netherlands 2017

 

 

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Birds Inspire 


 

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Today is a beautiful, sunny day, and the air is warming just slightly. Looking for inspiration, I often turn to nature as a most reliable source. Today’s focus is birds and flight, representing the power of the soaring spirit, indomitable and ever uplifting. What a blessing to hear the flutters and chirps outside my window. It gives me renewed determination to appreciate and preserve our natural environment.

Starting with a selection of bird paintings by artist Paul Klee, and one to honor Paul Klee, above, we move through a variety of media and artistic approaches.

Interwoven in this feature are bird sculptures and paintings/drawings I found everywhere.   I hope you enjoy their whimsy, movement and beauty today. I hope that a focus on inspiration and hope conveys the asssurance that we are so much more than a consumer culture repleat with an eternal quest for power and domination.

 

Check  out this poem by for a riveting summation and warning of how our culture could look to outsiders from the future.  This excerpt presents a perceptive view of a predominant movement in today’s culture.

This slim book of poetry — Mary Oliver’s Red Bird contains many wonderful poems. Here are A few lines of “Of the Empire”

We will be known as a culture that feared death
and adored power, that tried to vanquish insecurity
for the few and cared little for the penury of the
many. We will be known as a culture that taught
and rewarded the amassing of things, that spoke
little if at all about the quality of life for
people (other people), for dogs, for rivers. All
the world in our eyes, they will say, was a
commodity. And they will say that this structure
was held together politically, which it was, and
they will say also that our politics was no more
than an apparatus to accommodate the feelings of
the heart, and that the heart, in those days,
was small, and hard, and full of meanness.

 

 

And yet, Art can provide a reminder that our hearts and souls are larger, more compassionate than the metallic noise and dissection surrounding us now.  Compassion, insight and courage are still valued, still appreciated, still embodied by our culture at large.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


https://credmayne.com/2017/03/11/come-to-mama/1975-come-to-mama/

Collector’s Choice: Marc Chagall


 

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Marc Chagall (French, born Russia – present-day Belarus; 1887-1985): Carmen, 1966. Lithograph. Image size: 39-1/2 x 25-11/16 inches (100.5 x 65.3 cm). Created in 1966 from a maquette for Chagall’s “Triumph of Music,” a series of 3 large-scale decorations created for the Metropolitan Opera House in New York (Carmen, The Magic Flute, Romeo and Juliet). © Marc Chagall.

‘Chagall created this piece for the opera “Carmen” by George Bizet upon its opening at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. The print is a small detail from a preliminary painting of Chagall’s much larger “The Triumph of Music”, which now hangs at the Metropolitan Opera.’

“Chagall: Midsummer Night’s Dreams”
Through January 8, 2017
Carrières de Lumières, Les Baux de Provence, France
http://bit.ly/2heyQmy

Exhibition:
“Winter Exhibition 2016”
Until February 15, 2017
Gilden’s Art Gallery, London

Thanks to:  #IRequireArt @irequireart #art

 

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Born Moishe Shagal
6 July 1887 (N.S.)
Liozna, near Vitebsk, Russian Empire (present-day Belarus)
Died 28 March 1985 (aged 97)
Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France
Nationality Russian, later French
Known for Painting stained glass
Movement :  Cubism Expressionism

 
Marc Zakharovich Chagall (/ʃəˈɡɑːl/ shə-gahl,  6 July [O.S. 24 June] 1887 – 28 March 1985) was a Russian-French artist. An early modernist, he was associated with several major artistic styles and created works in virtually every artistic format, including painting, book illustrations, stained glass, stage sets, ceramic, tapestries and fine art prints.

Art critic Robert Hughes referred to Chagall as “the quintessential Jewish artist of the twentieth century” (though Chagall saw his work as “not the dream of one people but of all humanity”). According to art historian Michael J. Lewis, Chagall was considered to be “the last survivor of the first generation of European modernists”. For decades, he “had also been respected as the world’s preeminent Jewish artist”. Using the medium of stained glass, he produced windows for the cathedrals of Reims and Metz, windows for the UN, and the Jerusalem Windows in Israel. He also did large-scale paintings, including part of the ceiling of the Paris Opéra.

Before World War I, he traveled between St. Petersburg, Paris, and Berlin. During this period he created his own mixture and style of modern art based on his idea of Eastern European Jewish folk culture. He spent the wartime years in Soviet Belarus, becoming one of the country’s most distinguished artists and a member of the modernist avant-garde, founding the Vitebsk Arts College before leaving again for Paris in 1922.

He had two basic reputations, writes Lewis: as a pioneer of modernism and as a major Jewish artist. He experienced modernism’s “golden age” in Paris, where “he synthesized the art forms of Cubism, Symbolism, and Fauvism, and the influence of Fauvism gave rise to Surrealism.”  Yet throughout these phases of his style “he remained most emphatically a Jewish artist, whose work was one long dreamy reverie of life in his native village of Vitebsk.”

“When Matisse dies,” Pablo Picasso remarked in the 1950s, “Chagall will be the only painter left who understands what colour really is.”

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Marc Chagall

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Jean Michel Basquiat


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QUICK FACTS

NAME
Jean-Michel Basquiat
OCCUPATION
Painter
BIRTH DATE
December 22, 1960
DEATH DATE
August 12, 1988
PLACE OF BIRTH
Brooklyn, New York
PLACE OF DEATH
New York, New York
NICKNAME
“SAMO”

Jean-Michel Basquiat was a Neo-Expressionist painter in the 1980s. He is best known for his primitive style and his collaboration with pop artist Andy Warhol.

Synopsis

Jean-Michel Basquiat was born on December 22, 1960, in Brooklyn, New York. He first attracted attention for his graffiti under the name “SAMO” in New York City. He sold sweatshirts and postcards featuring his artwork on the streets before his painting career took off. He collaborated with Andy Warhol in the mid-1980s, which resulted in a show of their work. Basquiat died on August 12, 1988, in New York City.

 

Early Years

Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat was born in Brooklyn, New York, on December 22, 1960. With a Haitian-American father and a Puerto Rican mother, Basquiat’s diverse cultural heritage was one of his many sources of inspiration.

A self-taught artist, Basquiat began drawing at an early age on sheets of paper his father, an accountant, brought home from the office. As he delved deeper into his creative side, his mother strongly encouraged to pursue artistic talents.

Basquiat first attracted attention for his graffiti in New York City in the late 1970s, under the name “SAMO.” Working with a close friend, he tagged subway trains and Manhattan buildings with cryptic aphorisms.

In 1977, Basquiat quit high school a year before he was slated to graduate. To make ends meet, he sold sweatshirts and postcards featuring his artwork on the streets of his native New York.

Commercial Success

Three years of struggle gave way to fame in 1980, when his work was featured in a group show. His work and style received critical acclaim for the fusion of words, symbols, stick figures, and animals. Soon, his paintings came to be adored by an art loving public that had no problem paying as much as $50,000 for a Basquiat original.

His rise coincided with the emergence of a new art movement, Neo-Expressionism, ushering in a wave of new, young and experimental artists that included Julian Schnabel and Susan Rothenberg.

In the mid 1980s, Basquiat collaborated with famed pop artist Andy Warhol, which resulted in a show of their work that featured a series of corporate logos and cartoon characters.

On his own, Basquiat continued to exhibit around the country and the world. In 1986, he traveled to Africa for a show in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. That same year, the 25-year-old exhibited nearly 60 paintings at the Kestner-Gesellschaft Gallery in Hanover, Germany—becoming the youngest artist to ever showcase his work there.

Personal Problems

As his popularity soared, so did Basquiat’s personal problems. By the mid-1980s, friends became increasingly concerned by his excessive drug use. He became paranoid and isolated himself from the world around him for long stretches. Desperate to kick a heroin addiction, he left New York for Hawaii in 1988, returning a few months later and claiming to be sober.

Sadly, he wasn’t. Basquiat died of a drug overdose on August 12, 1988, in New York City. He was 27 years old. Although his art career was brief, Jean-Michel Basquiat has been credited with bringing the African-American and Latino experience in the elite art world.

Jean-Michel Basquiat Biography
Author

Biography.com Editors
Website Name

http://www.biography.com/people/jean-michel-basquiat-185851

 

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Helen Frankenthaler


“Jacob’s Ladder” by Helen Frankenthaler

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Although this painting shares a name with the biblical tale of Jacob’s dreamed ascent toward heaven, and also with an ancient Egyptian toy, Frankenthaler insisted this work had no illustrational intention: “The picture developed (bit by bit while I was working on it) into shapes symbolic of an exuberant figure and ladder, therefore Jacob’s Ladder.

Working in New York in the 1950s, Frankenthaler painted large-scale unprimed canvases on the floor to explore new ways of handling distinctively thinned paint. The artist said she borrowed from Jackson Pollock her “concern with line, fluid line, calligraphy, and … experiments with line not as line but as shape.”

 

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Helen Frankenthaler was an American abstract expressionist painter. She was a major contributor to the history of postwar American painting. Wikipedia
Died: December 27, 2011, Darien, CT
Spouse: Stephen M. DuBrul Jr. (m. 1994–2011), Robert Motherwell (m. 1958–1971)
Periods: Lyrical abstraction, Post-painterly abstraction, Color Field, Modern art, Abstract expressionism

Savage Peril: Ode to Our Earth


 

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Torn from our roots
The chaos ensues.

Broken from family
The surface unravels

From this revealed,
A new life emerges.

See the next forms
To sustain a new life.

Make art from chaos.
This is your life.

Poem and art  by Janis Kirstein

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Collector’s Choice: Laura Wait


 

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Artist’s Statement

Word forms as image are the primary focus of my art. Words and symbols, used as marks, are layered on paintings to form a wall of history with meaning at each depth. Aesthetics of words and symbols is of more importance than reading the text, and indeed most of the words I use are totally illegible. I believe man has an intuitive connection to marks, and there is worldwide use of similar mark forms from prehistoric times.

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Symbolism has interested me since I was young, and for a long time I incorporated world iconography and the meanings of four and into my art. This led to study of fertility symbols, conjoined with a study of tree symbolism. An interest in checkerboards followed, which led me to a study of chess. I incorporated words in this series from the writings of “The Art of War” by Sun Tzu. My paintings evolved at this time into paintings of words, often-large words, with energy, using words of conflict and from chess. Words have been my main interest ever since.

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I include medieval illuminated manuscripts among my influences, along with Asian writing and modern graffiti. My marks are polyglot letterforms much as in the movie Blade Runner. I see a huge melding in our world of Asian and Western writing and imagery, as well as life in general. I have always had an affinity for Asian art and allow it to influence many of the shapes I use. I also draw on the energy of modern graffiti, which I see as a source of new energy in abstraction much as African rhythms energized rock and roll and jazz.

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I create walls, with scribbling and writings, that may have been made over a period of years. My idea is to have the feel of the shapes, with an intuitive connection, and many layers to create depth. These are imagined underwater, in ancient times, on other planets, or in modern urban settings with layers of graffiti and signage. The marks are universal, somewhat random, and related to music, with layers of writing acting as layers of melody and rhythm.

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Nothing is quite concrete, and my work is very intuitive. My work is an affirmation of the human spirit and the mark of the hand. In our modern world, which is growing smaller, the influences of the computer are everywhere. Handwriting is an antidote to that, and connects strongly with people today

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ARTIST BIO

Laura Wait lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

She studied art history in college at Barnard College with the idea that she needed to look at art, and that the making could come later. New York was a wonderful place to see art, and she made bi weekly pilgrimages to look at art around the city. She received a BA, cum laude, in Art History from Barnard College, New York, 1975.

Laura lived for a year in Los Angeles in 1975-76, and studied lithography and drawing at Otis Art Institute. LA was another place to spend a lot of time looking and trying to understand current art.

She went to London in 1976 to study printmaking at Croydon College of Art, and received certificate in printmaking with merit for a one-year course in 1977, specializing in intaglio and bookbinding. She continued her studies in traditional bookbinding at Croydon, and received a Certificate with distinction for a three-year course in 1981.

Laura moved to Denver, Colorado in 1981, and started a bookbinding and conservation business, which she ran successfully until 2003. During that time she also worked on her own artist books and paintings, and gave many workshops in book arts. Her artist’s books are in collections worldwide, and have been published in a number of books and articles. In 2003 she decided to give up the bookbinding business and focus her attention completely on her own artwork. In 2004 she moved to Steamboat Springs, Colorado, and had a quiet and fruitful situation to experiment with new art for the next six years.

Laura now lives in Santa Fe. NM. She is married with one son, two dogs, and grows lots of organic vegetables.

 

 

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Artis Litterarius V

2011

(Latin trans. the art of words)
A Celebration of the letter as image.

Five of five in this series of unique books.

The boards are an irregular altarpiece shapes, with each book being different. Many layers of writing were attached to the original pages, creating different effects and textures.

Several lists of words were used:

  1. Words concerning writing like calligraphy, typography, manuscript, ligature, script etc
  2. Words denoting part of something like palimpsest, snippet, flash, scrap etc
  3. Some fragments of words to do with Sun Tzu such as ubiquitous, resilient, evasive, relentless.

 

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Technical: Sewn on linen cords with black linen thread. Cedar siding used for boards. Cords attached through the boards and attached on the inside. Boards are wrapped with Japanese paper then painted with acrylic and varnished with acrylic varnish. Acrylic paint, ink and watercolor were used in this book. Housed in drop back box lined with grey felt.

7 ”x 15 7/8” x 1 5/8”.

 

 

 

Thanks so much to Laura Wait for allowing me to share her work with you. Please go to her web site to see many more beautiful and thought provoking images.

Happy Halloween! The Ultimate ART DAY!


 

 

Two art students at Western Hills High School produce their Halloween interpretation of “Monster.”

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Painting by Julia Martinez, Sophomore at Western Hills High School

 

 

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Painting by Stirling Crawford, Junior, Western Hills High School

 

 

 

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Stirling speaks with his hand….
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Costume Day at Western Hills, with Cheech of Cheech and Chong, and an angel.

Monster Project:  For High School Level Students

 

Create a Monster                             Kirstein

 

Objective: Design a symbolic portrait of a “monster,” using symbols to convey the monster’s inner and outer personality, affinities and tendencies. You can use collage, pencil, colored pencil, marker or paint, and you must cover your whole sheet of paper with an environment for the monster.

 

 

Your monster does not have to be realistic or look like a person, but  it must include:

  • A monster figure, whether drawn, painted, or created with glued collage magazine pieces.

2) Use entire sheet of paper.

3) Use proportion to create a sense of the unusual and to create emphasis and balance. Create variety and harmony through the use of color, shape and value.

4) Monster needs to convery personality and the environment needs to surround it with symbols pertaining to the likes and dislikes of this monster you have created.

 

How to proceed:

Step 1: Draw your monster on a piece of 12” x 18”  white paper to formulate and brainstorm your design. On this paper, decide how the main figure will look, and how you will arrange the objects in your drawing.

Step two: Draw main figure and symbols with pencil.

Step three: Use prisma colored pencils or regular colored pencils for the color. You may also use tempra paint, water color or magic marker. Magazine collage is also encouraged. You may also glue in words that relate to the monster.

 

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“Clown” painted by Blaze Paul, Freshman Western Hills High School

Scale I: Focus

Project completed

Student followed directions/classroom rules

Student made effort to meet objectives and goals

Work completed on time

Effort/attitude

 

Scale II: Craftsmanship/Technique

Craftsmanship is aptitude, skill, manual dexterity in use of media and tools.

Technique is manner and skill with which the artist employs the tools/materials to

achieve the chosen effect.

Criteria:

Skillful use of media

Care taken with project

Work area cleaned daily

Media used with correct technique

Technical skill in the use of media

Visual detail (neatness)

Appropriate use of supplies and materials

Skillful and appropriate use of materials

 

Assessment:

 

4  Assignment on time; meets or exceeds all criteria.

3  Assignment on time with one criterion missing.

2  Assignment on time but has two criteria missing.

  • Assignment late or has three or four criteria missing.
  • Assignment late or has inappropriate solution to the problem, incomplete

 

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“Lion Monster” by Hala Jordon, Junior, Western Hills High School

Collector’s Choice: Tony Saladino


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http://prosites-saladino.homestead.com/

I Enjoy the risk taking aspect of doing varied themes, and shifting from medium to medium. While I consider many of my pieces to be personal I am, nevertheless, concerned that the viewer sees images that are universal enough to compel him or her to keep looking at the work.dd text.

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When we create a new building we don’t try to make it look like something else. It doesn’t stand for something else. An architect tries to make a place that is beautiful and that has utility. It can just provide shelter and be a meeting place. But it can be something more. It can be a beautiful place seen from outside and a comforting womb to those who work or meet there. So potential is a cogent part of this vessel.

 

 

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Such is the painting, being purely personal yet striving to have a universal appeal. My struggle is with my place in art and the question, “Do I have a place?” This conceit relates to me and to others as they struggle to understand what is valid in art. So much of the tension between beauty and decoration, the ancient objective and now, content and idea, seems inexorable. If I have just copied nature verbatim there is less of me and more a mirroring of what I think I see. If I want to convey ideas then the piece has to communicate on a scale that a viewer can understand. But this can destroy the opportunity for creating beauty. Thus the dilemma. What is a painting?

 

 

 

 

Those Fibonacci numbers in the vertical strip are a grounding consideration of the elegance of our universe and how things work in nature versus our minds. The two faces(of me) talk about the two poles of my struggle to find what is painting about for me. The dichotomy between thinking and acting, delineating and suggesting is just a glimpse into one artist’s thoughts.

 

 

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Tony Saladino was born in New Orleans. His BS degree is from LSU in New Orleans. His work is in the collections of the National Museum of Fine Arts, Hanoi, University of Wisconsin – Parkside, University of Dallas, Wichita Falls Museum, Museum of International Art, Bahia, Brazil, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana, Museum of Art and Archaeology, University of Missouri,and Parkersburg Art Center – Parkersburg, West Virginia.

He is listed in Who’s Who in American Art, and Who’s Who in the South and Southwest.

He has taught at The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, and Oxbow Summer School of Art, Michigan.

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Hispanic Heritage Month Celebrated in Our Classrooms


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Dawn Smith’s Spanish class and my Visual Art class joined together for a week long unit on creating paintings influenced by Mexican Alebrijes this week at Western Hills High School in Frankfort, Kentucky.  Painting and creative writing combined together for a learning experience in Social Studies, Spanish and Fashion Design.

To learn Global challenges of how to resolve conflicts, students had to work in groups and combine at least 2 animals from 2 different continents. They had to paint the animals, list their conflicts, how the animals could resolve those conflicts and capture these conflict resolutions in their choice of creative writing from poetry to dialogue to narrative writing. The writing portion was inspired by the book “Fantasy Animals” by Janis Kirstein, where a South American anteater and African lion are joined together and have to learn how to get along. This book was inspired by Mexican Alebrijes from Mexico, created with bright floral patterns in the 1930’s of conglomerations of various animals all in one being.

To see lesson plans for this unit,  go to:  https://kirsteinfineart.com/2016/07/27/lesson-plan-for-fantasy-animals/

To see the book written by Janis Kirstein inspired by Alebrijes,  go to: www.amazon.com/author/janiskirstein

 

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This Painting was inspired by Mexican Alebrijes, by Janis Kirstein in Mercedes Harn’s art class this summer. This class was for a teacher Inservice given by The Academy with the Kentucky Center for the Arts, combining the teaching of Social Studies, Visual Art and Spanish Language.