Collector’s Choice: Sigal Ron


 

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Sigal Ron

“I see myself as an abstract painter who enjoys freedom of expression.
However, we are all like ‘ swallows sitting on the wire of tradition,’ so from time to time I sin by creating objective art for feeling a communication with a greater public.  I adore every manifestation of visual art and enjoy crossing over and going back with the passion of a child who has gotten a new toy. I am grateful for every moment I can paint.”

Written by Zichron Jaacov Israel

 

 

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Sigal Ron is a painter who walks the fine line between completely non-objective painting and figurative painting with equal ease and grace. She  commands both sides of that artistic differentiation with prowess and inevitability.  Her non-objective paintings rush at us with volumes of hurtling textures, colors and glimmering light. Her figurative works walk with prowess all the way from realistic representation through graphic depiction to sighs of abbreviated yet essential abstractions. Her painterly touch is comprised of deft command, searing insight and relentlessly well timed orchestration. Bravo Sigal Ron! My hat is off to you!

Jan Kirstein

 

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Recent Exhibitions:

“GilArte” Gallery —Zichron Jaacov 2011

“Gam Gallery”—Tel Aviv 2011

“Gebo” Gallery—Tel Aviv 2012

International Exhibition of Art –Matera- Italy 2015

2nd International Bienalle of Art in Palermo 2014

4 International Abstract exhibition in Moscow 2015

2015 – Moscow “Gold collection of Abstract

Bienalle of Drawing Osten Museum – Skopje 2016

Museo Palazzo Farnese-International Exhibitin of Contemporary Art Juni 2016

Art for Peace- Museo Palazzo Farnese Ortona. Italy 2016

Gallery of Contemporary Art-Kazan-Russia

Juni 2016

Poligious Issues-Schiedam-Netherlands 2017

 

 

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“Imagination: The Creative Force of Life”


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Imagination: The Spirit of Sophia held “ The Creative Force of Life” at the Women’s Foundation’s Hopscotch House in Prospect, Kentucky today, Earth Day, April 22. Artist Joan Zehnder was our guide today as we wrote and made art about what we each individually have to offer the world. We then combined our writing and art in groups to create new worlds. What a meaningful, enriching, empowering and exhilarating experience. And what fun too! Perfect for a rainy Earth Day…..

 

 

Top left: Imagination participant Andria Creighton  contemplates her group’s creation. Top right: Going for a three-d effect here in this Imagination group effort. Bottom: Some thoughts of a participant.  2nd right:  Director and founder of Spirit of Sophia Dana Sue Walker writing and reflecting on her group’s New World Imagination group art.

 

 

Top left:  This is the lovely sitting room in the Hopscotch house provided by the Woman’s Foundation of Louisville, founded by Sally Bingham for the enrichment, advancement and enlightenment of women throughout the country. Top right: Another group contemplates their group creation. Bottom right: No matter which direction you look at it, this piece’s rich organic structure enhances the many gifts of all the women in this group.

 

Another Imagination group’s creative effort.

The entire Imagination experience was a high point of the week and a perfect way to celebrate Earth  Day, all enthusiastic participant agreed.

Collector’s Choice: Jane Davies’ New Exhibion


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Submerge yourself into a sea of dynamic visual poetry by abstract painting master Jane Davies. In Janes’s paintings, the world is true to nature in form and integrity. Images embrace the viewer with harmonious discourse of color, shape, line, texture and pattern, all orchestrated with an instinctual genius for proportion, movement and intuitive balance.

Take some time  to pull yourself away from today’s political world upheavals if only for a few moments. Change the scenery. Replace your television  with  these paintings by Jane Davies.

Change your life by changing your scenery .  Gaze at these amazing paintings. Change the world by changing the scenery in front of your eyes. You can change the world, beginning with your own world. And that is always the best place to start.

Let these paintings enter your vision and dance in your soul.

Written by Jan Kirstein, Painter

 

 

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Edgewater Gallery: “I have new framed pieces up at Edgewater Gallery in Middlebury, VT.,” says Jane Davies. “If you’re in the area I hope you’ll stop by. You can also purchase from their website, Take a look.

 

 

 

 

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JANE DAVIES
PAINTING + MIXED MEDIA
ARTIST STATEMENT

Formal elements are my first and foremost source of inspiration. I can be moved by a simple combination of color and line, or the relationships of shapes and edges, or the interplay between pattern and scale. I look at colors, textures and images out in the world as well: rocks, rust, surfaces affected by age, by marks of the human hand, by time and tides. But I also look at a lot of art in many mediums, and gorge myself on the infinite ways in which materials can be transformed into rich and expressive visual statements.
In my own art practice, focus on process is an essential component of developing work that feels authentic and personal. My process involves a back-and-forth play between spontaneous, intuitive mark-making, and careful deliberation and intention: I think of it as letting things happen, and making things happen. I make a move, and then the painting reveals something new to respond to. Each move changes the whole piece and sets up a new set of challenges. It takes practice and continued effort to stay present to this dialog and not get carried away by the desire for a quick result or an easy resolution. It requires trust in my own intuitive responses, and a willingness to not-know, to not have the route laid out like a road map.

 

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http://edgewatergallery.co/artists/jane-davies/

 

Visit Jane’s website:  http://www.janedaviesartgallery.com

 

Coming soon by Jane Davies:
New 100 Drawings: Starting October 4, 2017 – 10 interactive sessions online, find out more and register here.

 

 

 

On a more politically proactive note….Pink Postcards

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for viewing  the .KIRSTEINFINEART BLOG

 

Collector’s Choice: Jean Michel Basquiat


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QUICK FACTS

NAME
Jean-Michel Basquiat
OCCUPATION
Painter
BIRTH DATE
December 22, 1960
DEATH DATE
August 12, 1988
PLACE OF BIRTH
Brooklyn, New York
PLACE OF DEATH
New York, New York
NICKNAME
“SAMO”

Jean-Michel Basquiat was a Neo-Expressionist painter in the 1980s. He is best known for his primitive style and his collaboration with pop artist Andy Warhol.

Synopsis

Jean-Michel Basquiat was born on December 22, 1960, in Brooklyn, New York. He first attracted attention for his graffiti under the name “SAMO” in New York City. He sold sweatshirts and postcards featuring his artwork on the streets before his painting career took off. He collaborated with Andy Warhol in the mid-1980s, which resulted in a show of their work. Basquiat died on August 12, 1988, in New York City.

 

Early Years

Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat was born in Brooklyn, New York, on December 22, 1960. With a Haitian-American father and a Puerto Rican mother, Basquiat’s diverse cultural heritage was one of his many sources of inspiration.

A self-taught artist, Basquiat began drawing at an early age on sheets of paper his father, an accountant, brought home from the office. As he delved deeper into his creative side, his mother strongly encouraged to pursue artistic talents.

Basquiat first attracted attention for his graffiti in New York City in the late 1970s, under the name “SAMO.” Working with a close friend, he tagged subway trains and Manhattan buildings with cryptic aphorisms.

In 1977, Basquiat quit high school a year before he was slated to graduate. To make ends meet, he sold sweatshirts and postcards featuring his artwork on the streets of his native New York.

Commercial Success

Three years of struggle gave way to fame in 1980, when his work was featured in a group show. His work and style received critical acclaim for the fusion of words, symbols, stick figures, and animals. Soon, his paintings came to be adored by an art loving public that had no problem paying as much as $50,000 for a Basquiat original.

His rise coincided with the emergence of a new art movement, Neo-Expressionism, ushering in a wave of new, young and experimental artists that included Julian Schnabel and Susan Rothenberg.

In the mid 1980s, Basquiat collaborated with famed pop artist Andy Warhol, which resulted in a show of their work that featured a series of corporate logos and cartoon characters.

On his own, Basquiat continued to exhibit around the country and the world. In 1986, he traveled to Africa for a show in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. That same year, the 25-year-old exhibited nearly 60 paintings at the Kestner-Gesellschaft Gallery in Hanover, Germany—becoming the youngest artist to ever showcase his work there.

Personal Problems

As his popularity soared, so did Basquiat’s personal problems. By the mid-1980s, friends became increasingly concerned by his excessive drug use. He became paranoid and isolated himself from the world around him for long stretches. Desperate to kick a heroin addiction, he left New York for Hawaii in 1988, returning a few months later and claiming to be sober.

Sadly, he wasn’t. Basquiat died of a drug overdose on August 12, 1988, in New York City. He was 27 years old. Although his art career was brief, Jean-Michel Basquiat has been credited with bringing the African-American and Latino experience in the elite art world.

Jean-Michel Basquiat Biography
Author

Biography.com Editors
Website Name

http://www.biography.com/people/jean-michel-basquiat-185851

 

 

 

It’s Beginning to Look A Lot Like….


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This Holiday Season!

 

 

Here are some happy readers of my new book “Fantasy Animals.” To the left is Lucy Steilberg and Lucy Craig Steilberg from my church in Louisville, KY.  To the right is my mother,  Myrl Kirstein, who is going to be 91 years old in December and lives in Birmingham Alabama.

My mother is almost totally blind and has bravely decided to undergo eye surgery to correct her glaucoma. Please send prayers her way, as her surgery will be  December 6. Hopefully, she will be able to see much better after her surgery, which would be fitting for the woman who is responsible for teaching me to read.

Long Live Literacy!!

 

To purchase my book or see these additional products, click here

 

 

This little story provides an example of two very different animals learning to live together, work together and cooperate. What better lesson and example could you ask for in today’s world of conflict?

 

 

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Here is an excerpt from my book “Fantasy Animals.”

The first of these two most unique animals was an anteater named Vortex. His name came from the noise he would make as his two foot tongue  would lick up and gather multitudes of ants and stuff them into his long protruding proboscis. With loud, snorking and licking noises he would bring all ants anywhere into his wrinkly, quivering mouth.  Animals for miles around could hear the great vacuum of his enormous ingestions as he would begin laboring every morning right on the dot of 6:00 a.m.

“SNORK, SNORK, SNOOOOOOOOOORK,

SNORK!”

Vortex vacuumed up all the ants for miles around from the surrounding earthen ground using his tireless 24” tongue. While he did this, he also was very careful to keep very exacting accounts of precisely how many ants he devoured at any given time.

And while you might think his licking and snorking characteristics are what identified Vortex as unusual, these qualities were not, in fact, what put Vortex and his unlikely friend on the map, so to speak.

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At the same time that Vortex was born into this beautiful jungle forest, his dear companion and constant comrade, the courageous lion was born. She knew she was a queen from the day she was born and quickly became one of the fastest and fiercest animals in the entire jungle. She was known simply as Scoop.

Why Scoop, you say? Well, it was said by all the animals in her rainforest community, that she was so much faster than her prey, that she would merely spring and scoop, and her prey was already swallowed and digested.

Though lions generally populate the continent of Africa, Scoop somehow managed to arrive in the abundant rainforests of Peru in South America, along with her friend and constant companion Vortex.

So why were  these two animals so unique? You may ask. Well, here is the story I have been told by those who actually know and lived with Scoop and Vortex all the many years of their lives.

You see, these two animals were born as one. They were attached at the shoulder and torso, so that wherever one went, the other must go accordingly. No one knows why this unusual birth occurred, but animals and people from the region of Balta with firsthand experience declare that in fact, this pair was real and lived for many years in the Amazon jungle sometimes in harmony, sometimes not…

 

Get the book and find out what happens next and how these two animals work out their seemingly unresolvable problems.  click here to go to my Amazon page.

 

 

Click here to Check out these cool books at Amazon

 

 

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Janet Jones


 

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“Rather than collecting beautiful materials for collage and mixed media, I look for those that have had a troubled past.

 

 

I want to draw attention to the innate beauty of the stains, foxing and velvety patina of old book pages and the grime and grunge of “road kill” papers rescued from the street. Sometimes these found papers are finished pieces with very little intervention on my part, and in other cases I distress papers by soaking, laminating, staining, scorching and sanding to give them still more history.

 

 

I take pleasure in giving these humble materials the loving presentation they deserve.”

 

Janet Jones, artist

comjanetjonesfineart.com

 

 

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Collector’s Choice: Joan Mitchell


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Joan Mitchell The Last Paintings

3 February – 28 April 2012, Hauser & Wirth London, Piccadilly

‘My paintings aren’t about art issues. They’re about a feeling that comes to me from the outside, from landscape. … Paintings aren’t about the person who makes them, either. My paintings have to do with feelings’.

– Joan Mitchell, 1974

 

 

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Hauser & Wirth is proud to present an exhibition of late paintings by American Abstract Expressionist, Joan Mitchell. Created during the last decade of her life, these large-scale canvasses mark a distinct departure from her more sombre works of the early 1960s. Her late paintings, dating from 1985 to 1992, are replete with vibrant colours, energy and excitement, combining Mitchell’s admiration of the work of Van Gogh and Monet, her interest in nature and her adept skill at expressing emotions and memories.

 

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Mitchell was born in Chicago and in 1950 moved to New York where she was one of the few female artists to participate in seminal exhibitions alongside prominent Abstract Expressionists such as Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollock and Franz Kline. In 1959, Mitchell relocated to France. She stayed in Paris for eight years before she moved to Vétheuil where she remained for the last 25 years of her life, producing dynamic paintings despite such momentous events as the loss of close family, friends and her long battle with cancer that took her life in 1992.

 

 

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Like many of the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists, Mitchell was fascinated by the French countryside and the lush landscape of Vétheuil featured prominently in her late paintings. In the diptych ‘River’, a painting of the River Seine as seen from her home, Mitchell filled two canvasses with vigorous brushstrokes in an array of greens, blues, purples, reds and a swath of yellow paint crossing the bottom of the canvas to represent the river. In ‘Sunflowers’, Mitchell again used a diptych format to depict one of her most well known subjects in the twilight of its life. In a conversation with Yves Michaud, Mitchell once said, ‘Sunflowers are something I feel very intensely. They look so wonderful when young and they are so moving when they are dying…’. With ‘Sunflowers’, Mitchell worked quickly across her canvasses, expressing her intense feeling through the intense gestures that form the unrestrained and multi-coloured flowers’ blooms. Pushing the boundaries of abstract painting, both ‘River’ and ‘Sunflowers’ illustrate Mitchell’s emotional and physical recollections of the countryside she loved.

 

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The exhibition also features Mitchell’s late, purely abstract paintings. These works range in format including single canvases, diptychs and tondos. The works display a radical and free use of colour and line, as well as a confident experimentation with composition, scale and physical structure. Each painting showcases Mitchell’s mature artistic style that, over a prolific period of three decades, had fully developed into a unique personal language of colour, line and form. Together, these late paintings demonstrate what Richard Marshall describes in the exhibition’s accompanying catalogue as the artist’s ‘pure joy of putting paint to canvas’.

 

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‘Joan Mitchell. The Last Paintings’ was organised in collaboration with Cheim & Read, New York and the Joan Mitchell Foundation.

 

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Click here to see a great video about Joan Mitchell’s Last Years and Her Painting

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Thanks so much for coming to my blog today. Please share your thoughts and feelings here on this page. And subscribe to Kirsteinfineart  by going to the subscribe button on the right side of this page.

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Helen Frankenthaler


“Jacob’s Ladder” by Helen Frankenthaler

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Although this painting shares a name with the biblical tale of Jacob’s dreamed ascent toward heaven, and also with an ancient Egyptian toy, Frankenthaler insisted this work had no illustrational intention: “The picture developed (bit by bit while I was working on it) into shapes symbolic of an exuberant figure and ladder, therefore Jacob’s Ladder.

Working in New York in the 1950s, Frankenthaler painted large-scale unprimed canvases on the floor to explore new ways of handling distinctively thinned paint. The artist said she borrowed from Jackson Pollock her “concern with line, fluid line, calligraphy, and … experiments with line not as line but as shape.”

 

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Helen Frankenthaler was an American abstract expressionist painter. She was a major contributor to the history of postwar American painting. Wikipedia
Died: December 27, 2011, Darien, CT
Spouse: Stephen M. DuBrul Jr. (m. 1994–2011), Robert Motherwell (m. 1958–1971)
Periods: Lyrical abstraction, Post-painterly abstraction, Color Field, Modern art, Abstract expressionism

The Raven Collage – Mixed Media Collage —


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Originally posted on M.E. Ologeanu – artworks: buy art on ebay The Raven Collage – Mixed Media Collage

via The Raven Collage – Mixed Media Collage — KIRSTEINFINEART

 

Robert Ronnow  

Under Mummy Mountain

Aspen, ponderosa pine, blue spruce
pink glacier-cut rock, scree, ravens
gray jay, peregrine falcon, hawk.

We climb to 11,000 feet in three days,
camp at Lawn Lake for three days. Alpine
tundra. Elk, bighorn sheep, marmot.

Tileston Meadows, ticks in grass,
rock face of Mummy Mountain.
Binoculars show pink cracks in gray rock.

Stoke gas stoves, play cards.
Boil water, set up tarps, lay out
sleeping bags, hang bear bag.

Watch crescent moon slice into
Fairchild Mountain. Moonlight
makes a mosque of the rocks.

Yellow aspen splash in dark green
spruce and pine. Gullies where streams
slash during spring snowmelt.

One rock, feather or flower worth
more than money. Need no wallet,
keys. Just clothes for fur.

All day climb toward saddle to see
what’s on other side. One hawk floating
among bare peaks and over valleys.

Wind at 13,000 feet
turns to sleet. Turn back from peak,
take boulders two at a time down.

Winter moves into mountains.
Then we fly from Denver to New York
where it’s still summer.

 

Collector’s Choice: Tony Saladino


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http://prosites-saladino.homestead.com/

I Enjoy the risk taking aspect of doing varied themes, and shifting from medium to medium. While I consider many of my pieces to be personal I am, nevertheless, concerned that the viewer sees images that are universal enough to compel him or her to keep looking at the work.dd text.

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When we create a new building we don’t try to make it look like something else. It doesn’t stand for something else. An architect tries to make a place that is beautiful and that has utility. It can just provide shelter and be a meeting place. But it can be something more. It can be a beautiful place seen from outside and a comforting womb to those who work or meet there. So potential is a cogent part of this vessel.

 

 

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Such is the painting, being purely personal yet striving to have a universal appeal. My struggle is with my place in art and the question, “Do I have a place?” This conceit relates to me and to others as they struggle to understand what is valid in art. So much of the tension between beauty and decoration, the ancient objective and now, content and idea, seems inexorable. If I have just copied nature verbatim there is less of me and more a mirroring of what I think I see. If I want to convey ideas then the piece has to communicate on a scale that a viewer can understand. But this can destroy the opportunity for creating beauty. Thus the dilemma. What is a painting?

 

 

 

 

Those Fibonacci numbers in the vertical strip are a grounding consideration of the elegance of our universe and how things work in nature versus our minds. The two faces(of me) talk about the two poles of my struggle to find what is painting about for me. The dichotomy between thinking and acting, delineating and suggesting is just a glimpse into one artist’s thoughts.

 

 

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Tony Saladino was born in New Orleans. His BS degree is from LSU in New Orleans. His work is in the collections of the National Museum of Fine Arts, Hanoi, University of Wisconsin – Parkside, University of Dallas, Wichita Falls Museum, Museum of International Art, Bahia, Brazil, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana, Museum of Art and Archaeology, University of Missouri,and Parkersburg Art Center – Parkersburg, West Virginia.

He is listed in Who’s Who in American Art, and Who’s Who in the South and Southwest.

He has taught at The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, and Oxbow Summer School of Art, Michigan.

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