Getty Museum’s Open Content project makes 4,600 pieces of art freely available to download


 

 

Much of the world’s great artwork is tightly controlled, but the Getty Museum just announced a significant initiative to open things up — its new Open Content Program has made some 4,600 pieces of art from the museum’s collection free to use. Users can visit the Getty Search Gateway to browse through the entire collection of high-resolution images, and they can all be used for commercial and non-commercial purposes so long as they’re properly attributed to the museum. When downloading an image, the site also asks for you to share why you’re using it — so the museum can see why people are downloading its content.

Amongst the many freely available pieces of art released by Getty are a number of quite famous images, including work by Claude Monet, Vincent van Gogh, Rembrandt, and Leonardo da Vinci.  The 4,600 pieces of artwork available are just the beginning, as well. Getty says that it’s actively exploring the possibility of releasing much more art into the public domain, both from the museum’s collection as well as materials from the Getty Research Institute’s special collections. While Getty isn’t the first museum to push forward with an open artwork initiative (the museum cited a number of institutions like the Walters Art Museum as inspirations for the movement), it’s the latest example of how the internet is making classic, famous works more accessible.

Image credit:

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853 – 1890)
Irises, 1889, Oil on canvas
Unframed: 71.1 x 93 cm (28 x 36 5/8 in.)
Framed: 95.3 x 115.6 x 7.9 cm (37 1/2 x 45 1/2 x 3 1/8 in.)
The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

OTHER FAMOUS WORKS OF INTEREST

Leonardo da Vinci (Italian, 1452 – 1519), Caricature of a Man with Bushy Hair, Italian, about 1495, Pen and brown ink, 6.6 x 5.4 cm (2 5/8 x 2 1/8 in.)

Jean-François Millet (French, 1814 – 1875), Man with a Hoe, French, 1860 – 1862, Oil on canvas, 81.9 × 100.3 cm (32 1/4 × 39 1/2 in.)

Paul Cézanne (French, 1839 – 1906), Young Italian Woman at a Table, French, about 1895 – 1900, Oil on canvas, 92.1 × 73.5 cm (36 1/4 × 28 15/16 in.)

Théodore Géricault (French, 1791 – 1824), The Race of the Riderless Horses, French, 1817, Oil and pen and ink on paper laid on canvas, 19.8 × 29.1 cm (7 13/16 × 11 7/16 in.),

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853 – 1890), Portrait of Joseph Roulin, Dutch, 1888, Reed and quill pen and brown ink, over black chalk, 32.1 × 24.4 cm (12 5/8 × 9 5/8 in.)

Teri Dryden: Collages to Die For


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For years in Louisville, I saw the collages of Teri Dryden, and was riveted by her uncanny ability to place together every piece of torn paper to create a perfectly unified field of incongruent, yet visually connected torn scraps. Her collages vibrate with decisively placed color and shape. Symphonies of seemingly random, yet innately balanced pieces of torn edges, rough contrasting pigments and typography sing a hallelujah chorus of undeniable strength and boldness.

 

Janis Kirstein

 

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“i plunge into each piece of work as if it were an adventure into the unknown. with no specific outcome in mind, i respond to the changes in the picture as i explore and interact with materials by layering paint and paper, scratching, sanding and marking, creating open spaces, altering and adjusting,” Teri says.

 

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“i move between intuition and logic; chaos and order. being aware and open, taking risks with the materials, as well as the struggle itself allows me to be in the moment to reflect and interpret a history that evolves on the canvas before my eyes.

 

 

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Teri Dryden’s unorthodox path to becoming an artist began with immersion in an ancient art form in which she, herself was the medium. A theatre major at Towson University in Baltimore, Maryland, she excelled in physical expression and comedy. At the urging of an instructor, she auditioned and won a coveted spot as one of the few female clowns in the Ringling Brothers’ Barnum and Bailey Circus. For two unforgettable years, she performed in every state in the U.S. in one of the most colorful and visually stimulating environments imaginable.

 

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She then moved to Los Angeles and became an award-winning stage actress, but left the stage when her first child was born. After making beautiful fiber art for several years, Teri decided to take an art class, and discovered a latent talent and passion for painting and drawing. During a remarkably short and prolific period, she won several awards and sold dozens of paintings and drawings to rapt fans who recognized her unique sense of composition and color in dramatic florals and still-lives. She feels she has found her true aesthetic after discovering the fascinating world of mixed media and collage.

 

 

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She is a member of the collage artists of America, National Collage Society and Women Painters West. Her work is included in many private and public collections and has been exhibited in numerous solo, group and juried exhibitions across the country.

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Hyunmee Lee


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Click on thumbnails to enlarge

 

 

Hyunmee Lee’s paintings deliver a punch and a whisper, all within a complete sentence of harmony and stabilization.  Space and form balance in a delicate dialogue of opposites, yet the connections feel completely inevitable and preordained, as though this image is, will be, and has always been just so as you see it, indelibly existing forever and now, simultaneously.

Jan Kirstein

 

 

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ARTIST STATEMENT
My art practice crosses three continents over two decades. The works consider the images and ideas that mark my journey into the spiritual and cultural dimensions of painting as a creative activity. During a period when I have carried adventurous journeys across several different social and geographic divides, I began to search deeper for an understanding of who I am, and where I am. My paintings started to explore the idea of self as the most fundamental element of human nature; I tried to seek my identity as I examined human nature.

 

 

 

 

 

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In 1961 Hyunmee Lee was born in Seoul Korea, where she grew up practicing Western Modern art with experience in Eastern painting and calligraphy. Her art practice crosses three continents over two decades.

1985 Lee graduated Hong-Ik University majoring in painting. At the end of that year, she moved to Australia. She stayed there for six years and achieved two post graduate degrees. 1989 she exhibited in her first commercial gallery, Bonython-Meodemore Gallery, Sydney. At the same time, her work was exposed through a contemporary art book (Art Four).

1991 Hyunmee Lee earned a Master of Arts in Visual Arts (MFA) at the Sydney College of Arts, University of Sydney and returned to Korea. She lived in Korea for seven years. There she taught in Hong-Ik University as a lecturer and exhibited in solo shows in major art galleries and art fairs in Seoul.

1997 Lee came to Utah, U.S.A. where she continuously taught in universities and built up her art career. 2001 She became a faculty member of Utah Valley University. 2002 Lee had her first solo show in America, called Mountain Armatures, at the Woodbury Art Museum in Orem, Utah. 2006 She showed her large scale work in the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Intimacy Without Restraint. 2008 After achieving tenure, she retired from teaching and more fully concentrated on her art. She is currently working with U.S.A galleries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seas of the Moon by Painter Sandy Miller Sasso


 

THE RECENT WORK OF SANDY SASSO

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The paintings and drawings of Sandy Sasso reign in the forces of nature to tell a story of mysterious talismans, presenting a reality woven from metaphoric symbolism and imagination. The results form an astute observation of a current collective consciousness and state of mind of our world today.

Jan Kirstein

 

“I am still haunted by the names of the seas of the moon… Sea of Crisis, Sea of Rains, Sea of Tranquility, Sea of Cold…. they sum up my response to the atmosphere of fragility and uncertainty that permeates the world now. I ordered a 3-D moon the size of a tennis ball that I suspend in still life set ups of illuminated objects from the woods around our house.”

Sandy Miller Sasso

 

 

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Sea of Crisis II
22x5inches, charcoal/conte on paper, 2016

 

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Sea of Rains
22x5inches, charcoal, conte on paper, 2016
This drawing is currently in Ways of Seeing, a traveling exhibit organized by the Kentucky Arts Council. Sites are Hindman; Richmond; Williamsburg, Somerset, and Madisonville.

 

 

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Beech Leaves
22 . 4.5 inches,charcoal and conte on paper, 2015
Private collection

 

“I have been working on a series of paintings and drawings united by the theme of the mares, or seas of the moon. Several of these paintings were on exhibit in Paducah, KY; at the Legacy exhibit of past and present art teachers at the Paducah School of Art and Design, and in Different Times Different Places, a group show at the Ruth Baggett Gallery. The entire body of work has just been shown at the Murray Art Guild in March, 2017 in Sea of Crisis, a solo show.”

 

Click thumbnails to enlarge

 

 

Artist Sandy Sasso lives with her husband, artist Paul Sasso in a lovely home they designed and built, surrounded by their own splendidly created gardens in Western Kentucky. Their daughter, now grown is Maggie Sasso, also an artist.

Sandy has also taught as a high school visual arts teacher in Murray Kentucky, and most recently taught a painting workshop at Arrowmont School of Art and Craft in Gatlinburg, TN in early November, 2016.

“It was really great to teach again, and the students and the facilities at Arrowmont were all exceptional,” she says. “The horrible fire happened two weeks after I was there. Though three buildings on campus were lost the studio/lab buildings are intact and all classes are on schedule for 2017. ”

 

 

To see more art works by Sandy Miller Sasso, visit her artist website at www.sandymillersasso.com