Miguel Velit and His Completed Sculpture


 

 

Here’s Miguel Velit, in triumph before the sculpture he completed  at the beginning of August at Josephine Sculpture Park in Frankfort, Kentucky where he was a guest artist.

 

 

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Miguel Velit is a Sculptor from Lima, Peru. His sculptures include a whimsical but powerful exploration of dynamic space. I have known him since our days together at Vermont Studio  in Johnson Vermont and his work has always been a testimonial to the relentless pursuit of art and its ability to influence and alter the world.

 

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This Summer, he was  in residence at the nearby Josephine Sculpture Park in Frankfort, Kentucky as a guest artist where he was working on a variety of large metal sculptures from scrap metal gathered from local metal scrap metal yards. He has completed his sculpture and I have included photos of the results.

 

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Miguel has built sculptures all over the world for a variety of parks, interior and exterior spaces. Countries where his work is on exhibit include China, Poland, the United States, Argentina, Mexico and of course, his beloved hometown Lima, Peru.

 

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Embracing a vigorous investigation of building materials and spatial explorations, Miguel builds sculptures that are arrestingly confident, playful and memorable.

 

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Kentucky was honored to host Miguel as he continues his lifelong  artistic quest.

 

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Latest Works of Jan Kirstein


Primarily a painter, my creative process combines a mixture of media and collage, including acrylic, pastel, colored pencil & Photoshop, Sumi-E Ink and Japanese Rice paper. 

 

 

 

Sumi E Ink and Japanese Rice Paper 4 small

“The Great Horse Race”  by Janis Kirstein

 

I love making these collages. Action painting is my joy for more than 30 years and continues to this day, today, with Sumi-E ink and a haiki brush. I add Japanese rice paper torn scraps, and combine a variety of media including paint, watercolor, graphite, ink, colored pencil, even glitter, all to make a free flowing capture of the creative energy that surrounds me at any given moment. All this has somehow landed on a stretched canvas diptych measuring 32″ in width and 20″ in height. Right now I am creating this series of paintings in my basement. Well actually, RIGHT NOW I am telling you about me doing it! Clarification. I will be continuing this process upon completing this epistle and I will keep you updated on my progress!

 

 

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To achieve the atmospheric abstraction seen in my work, I especially make use of transparent layering. The scale of my pieces can range from my use of the Nano image to images of outer space. My canvases and paper works range in size from small ,5″ x 6″, to medium 20″ x 32″ to large 4′ x 8.’That means all realities are visible simultaneously, which creates a paradox or sense perceptive omnipotence within you, the perceiver. It’s much like being able to see all dimensions of reality within one gaze.
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I invite all of you to join in my creative parade and journey. Get front row seats and join me in this exhilarating endeavor! Thanks for joining me! I love having you come with me by coming to my new website on Patreon.

Here you will have the opportunity to make a small financial donation to help sustain my creative endeavor. You can make a pledge and receive all kinds of various goodies and discounts as a reward for your patronage. I am still compiling my list of rewards and placing them on the website, so check back in a few days to see additional rewards that will be added.

 

 

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Close up view. Collage by Janis Kirstein

I greatly appreciate and value your contribution  to my journey as a creative artist. With your generous support, via my new membership with Patreon. If you wish to follow and participate in my ever expanding creative road of discovery you can make a small donation of support on my Patreon website here. With your help, we can ride this creative journey together! Thanks so much!

Jan Kirstein

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Why do’t you check out the latest fashion updates on Kirsteinfineart fashion here.

 

 

 

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Third Eye Chakra Racerback Dress

 

The Art of Dreams


Dreams form one of the main pathways to the workings and special messages from the subconscious mind. Dream journals are one of the many ways to uncover the world that goes beyond our concrete reality and merges with a montage of ethereal symbols and realities to convey  new meaning in our daily lives.
Here are some very strange and unique artistic captures of this other world we fall through while in our sleep.
Jan Kirstein

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Half our dayes wee passe in the shadowe of the earth, and the brother of death exacteth a third part of our lives.

(Thomas Browne, On Dreams)

…night after night, with calm incuriousness we open the door into that ghostly underworld, and hold insane revels with fantastic spectres, weep burning tears for empty griefs, babble with foolish laughter at witless jests, stain our souls with useless crime, or fly with freezing blood from the grasp of an unnamed dread ; and, with the morning, saunter serenely back from these wild adventures into the warm precincts of the cheerful day, unmoved, unstartled, and forgetting.

(Elizabeth Bisland, Dreams and their Mysteries)

Dreams have long proved a fertile ground for human creativity and expression, and no less so than in the visual arts, giving rise to some of its most arresting images. In addition to the many and varied dreams so important to religion and myth there has emerged, in the last few centuries since the birth of Romanticism, an exploration of the more personal dream-world. Indeed, with its link to the unconscious, the form has perhaps proved the perfect vehicle for those artists looking to surface that which lies submerged – desire, guilt, fear, ambition – to bring to light the truth the waking mind keeps hid.

No doubt, also, artists have been attracted to the challenge of giving form to something so visually intangible as a dream, a challenge taken up in many ways through the centuries. More often than not there appears the sleeping body itself, with the dream element incorporated in a variety of ways. Common is for the dream sequence to appear in a totally separate part of the image, as if projected on the walls of the sleeping mind: often in the midst of that familiar floating cloud, but also as emerging from nearby objects or events of the day (see the Toyokuni image below) . Also common, particularly in the depiction of nightmares, is for the figures of the dream to simply appear as though in the room with the sleeper, often directly upon the body itself (see the Fuseli below). With the advent of photography, and the potential of double exposures, we see also a different way of trying to capture that intangibility of the dream image. With both the Grandville and Redon images featured, and the work of the Surrealists they anticipate, we see a different approach entirely, one which looks past the sleeper to focus solely on the imagery of the dream itself, and in the process perhaps giving a more true impression of the strangeness and otherworldliness which so often characterises the dream experience.

The Nightmare, by Henry Fuseli (1781). Perhaps Fuseli’s best known work, it has been copied by other artists, including many engravings such as this one by Thomas Burke – Source.
Dream-land (ca. 1883), an etching by S.J. Ferris after a painting by C.D. Weldon – Source.
El sueño del caballero, or The Knight’s Dream (ca. 1655), by Antonio de Pereda – Source.
The Jockey’s Dream (ca. 1880), published by Currier & Ives – Source.
A Nightmare (19th century), by E. Vavasseur – Source.
Nightmare (1810), by Jean Pierre Simon – Source: Wellcome Library.
Job’s Evil Dreams (1805), by William Blake, from a series of 19 watercolours illustrating the Book of Job that Blake painted in 1805-6 for Thomas Butts – Source.
A Child Dreams of the Passing of Time (17th century), by Boetius Adamsz Bolswert – Source.
The Soldiers Dream of Home (ca. 1861), by unknown artist – Source.
A Dream of Crime & Punishment (1847), by J.J. Grandville. Predating Dostoevsky’s book by some 20 years, it shows “the dream of an assassin overcome by remorse” – Source.
Dream Vision; A Nightmare (1525), by Albrecht Dürer: a watercolour and accompanying text describing an apocalyptic dream Dürer had on the night of 7-8th June 1525. The text readsIn 1525, during the night between Wednesday and Thursday after Whitsuntide, I had this vision in my sleep, and saw how many great waters fell from heaven. The first struck the ground about four miles away from me with such a terrible force, enormous noise and splashing that it drowned the entire countryside. I was so greatly shocked at this that I awoke before the cloudburst. And the ensuing downpour was huge. Some of the waters fell some distance away and some close by. And they came from such a height that they seemed to fall at an equally slow pace. But the very first water that hit the ground so suddenly had fallen at such velocity, and was accompanied by wind and roaring so frightening, that when I awoke my whole body trembled and I could not recover for a long time. When I arose in the morning, I painted the above as I had seen it. May the Lord turn all things to the best – Source.
Yume no ukihashi, or The Bridge of Dreams (1854), by Utagawa Toyokuni – Source.
The Artist’s Dream (1840), by George H. Comegys. The artist, with his head down on a table in his studio, perhaps seeking divine intervention, is having a vision of great artists from the past, such as: Sir Joshua Reynolds, Rubens, Rembrandt, Titian, Leonardo Da Vinci, Raphael Michelangelo, and others – Source.
Legend of St Francis: Dream of the Palace (1297 – 1299), by Giotto – Source.
The Orangerie;—or—the Dutch Cupid Reposing After the Fatigues of Planting, depicting William V, Prince of Orange, as a fat, naked Cupid (1796), by James Gillray – Source.
Tatiana Larina’s dream (1891), by Ivan Volkov – Source.
The Orphan’s Dream (19th century), by James Elliott – Source.
Dreaming of Santa Claus (ca. 1897), by William H. Rau – Source.
A Verger’s Dream: Saints Cosmas and Damian Performing a Miraculous Cure by Transplantation of a Leg (ca. 1495), by Masterof Los Balbases, – Source: Wellcome Library.
Tako to ama, or The Dream of the Fisherman’s Wife (1814), an erotic ukiyo-e by Hokusai, from the book Kinoe no Komatsu (English: Young Pines), a three-volume book of shunga erotica first published in 1814. For an English translation of the rather racy text see the link to the source – Source.
Jacob’s Dream (late 16th century), by Adam Elsheimer – Source.
The Dream of King Nebuchadnezzar (10th century), Staatsbibliothek Bamberg, Msc. Bibl. 22, fol. 31v – Source.
The Dream of Pilate’s Wife (ca. 1879), by Gustave Doré. According to Matthew 27:19, While Pilate was sitting in the judgment hall, his wife sent him a message: “Have nothing to do with that innocent man, because in a dream last night, I suffered much on account of him.” – Source.
‘Emperor Godaigo, dreaming of ghosts in his palace (1890), by Ogata Gekkō – Source.
Dream (1878 – 1882), by Odilon Redon – Source.
Little Nemo comic strip, by Winsor McCay (1906). This particular strip was from a European edition and never printed in the US – Source
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KIRSTEINFINEART Presents the “Evening Splendor Collection”


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This New Collection by KIRSTEINFINEART is what you have been waiting for:  Smashing style for your dressy occasions combined with a comfort level found only with casual clothes.

Dressy meets casual.

Fabulous t-shirt designs all from Jan Kirstein’s collage paintings pair with leggings in a variety of matching colors and patterns.

Make a splash this evening and feel completely comfortable throughout your all your special events, whether dashing out to a festive night out, or staying home for a quiet, relaxing evening.

 

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Photo by Mica Guerrero