Seas of the Moon by Painter Sandy Miller Sasso


 

THE RECENT WORK OF SANDY SASSO

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The paintings and drawings of Sandy Sasso reign in the forces of nature to tell a story of mysterious talismans, presenting a reality woven from metaphoric symbolism and imagination. The results form an astute observation of a current collective consciousness and state of mind of our world today.

Jan Kirstein

 

“I am still haunted by the names of the seas of the moon… Sea of Crisis, Sea of Rains, Sea of Tranquility, Sea of Cold…. they sum up my response to the atmosphere of fragility and uncertainty that permeates the world now. I ordered a 3-D moon the size of a tennis ball that I suspend in still life set ups of illuminated objects from the woods around our house.”

Sandy Miller Sasso

 

 

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Sea of Crisis II
22x5inches, charcoal/conte on paper, 2016

 

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Sea of Rains
22x5inches, charcoal, conte on paper, 2016
This drawing is currently in Ways of Seeing, a traveling exhibit organized by the Kentucky Arts Council. Sites are Hindman; Richmond; Williamsburg, Somerset, and Madisonville.

 

 

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Beech Leaves
22 . 4.5 inches,charcoal and conte on paper, 2015
Private collection

 

“I have been working on a series of paintings and drawings united by the theme of the mares, or seas of the moon. Several of these paintings were on exhibit in Paducah, KY; at the Legacy exhibit of past and present art teachers at the Paducah School of Art and Design, and in Different Times Different Places, a group show at the Ruth Baggett Gallery. The entire body of work has just been shown at the Murray Art Guild in March, 2017 in Sea of Crisis, a solo show.”

 

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Artist Sandy Sasso lives with her husband, artist Paul Sasso in a lovely home they designed and built, surrounded by their own splendidly created gardens in Western Kentucky. Their daughter, now grown is Maggie Sasso, also an artist.

Sandy has also taught as a high school visual arts teacher in Murray Kentucky, and most recently taught a painting workshop at Arrowmont School of Art and Craft in Gatlinburg, TN in early November, 2016.

“It was really great to teach again, and the students and the facilities at Arrowmont were all exceptional,” she says. “The horrible fire happened two weeks after I was there. Though three buildings on campus were lost the studio/lab buildings are intact and all classes are on schedule for 2017. ”

 

 

To see more art works by Sandy Miller Sasso, visit her artist website at www.sandymillersasso.com

 

 

Hispanic Heritage Month Celebrated in Our Classrooms


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Dawn Smith’s Spanish class and my Visual Art class joined together for a week long unit on creating paintings influenced by Mexican Alebrijes this week at Western Hills High School in Frankfort, Kentucky.  Painting and creative writing combined together for a learning experience in Social Studies, Spanish and Fashion Design.

To learn Global challenges of how to resolve conflicts, students had to work in groups and combine at least 2 animals from 2 different continents. They had to paint the animals, list their conflicts, how the animals could resolve those conflicts and capture these conflict resolutions in their choice of creative writing from poetry to dialogue to narrative writing. The writing portion was inspired by the book “Fantasy Animals” by Janis Kirstein, where a South American anteater and African lion are joined together and have to learn how to get along. This book was inspired by Mexican Alebrijes from Mexico, created with bright floral patterns in the 1930’s of conglomerations of various animals all in one being.

To see lesson plans for this unit,  go to:  https://kirsteinfineart.com/2016/07/27/lesson-plan-for-fantasy-animals/

To see the book written by Janis Kirstein inspired by Alebrijes,  go to: www.amazon.com/author/janiskirstein

 

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This Painting was inspired by Mexican Alebrijes, by Janis Kirstein in Mercedes Harn’s art class this summer. This class was for a teacher Inservice given by The Academy with the Kentucky Center for the Arts, combining the teaching of Social Studies, Visual Art and Spanish Language.

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Cynthia Decker


http://www.curious3d.com

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I am a lighthearted digital artist currently living and working in Asheville, North Carolina.

My artwork is best described, I think, as ‘imaginary realism’. I like to create impossible or improbable environments that have familliar textures and evocative moods. Most of my work has humor, or a bit of a story to tell.

I am inspired by the everyday, by small moments and big ideas. I love working in the digital medium because it lets me take these ideas and present them to you the same way I see them in my head—as places you could walk into and explore.

I believe the digital medium is finding its place in the art world, and that artists should use, value and enjoy all available means of creative expression. I hope that artists and art lovers everywhere continue to push the boundaries of what constitutes a fine art medium.

 

 

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Biography

I live and work nestled in the beautiful mountains of Western North Carolina. I am blissfully married to my loving and supportive husband, who is an industrial designer for most of the day and a talented woodworker for whatever is left over. My handsome, brilliant stepson is in college studying Architecture (or maybe something else, he hasn’t decided yet) . My office studio faces right into the woods adjacent to the Blue Ridge Parkway. Every day I am surrounded by the perfect balance of technology and nature. I couldn’t wish for more.

As a child, I would draw and paint at any opportunity. My Mother was the head of the computer science department at a local community college, and my father was an engineer for Ford Aerospace. We had a computer in the house when not very many people had home computers. I used to doodle on used punch cards and green and white striped pin fed printer paper. I began drawing – pixel by pixel – on a glorious Apple II computer when I was about 13, and I never stopped. Throughout high school and college I studied design, and during this time I started digital painting, and also continued working in traditional media; mostly pastels and acrylic paint.

I left college to begin a graphic design career and continued to teach myself and explore new digital media. I began using 3D software in 1998 and was immediately hooked. Initially, my portfolio was exclusively online, and I was invited to participate in many web-based galleries. My images seemed to generate a lot of interest. People began requesting prints through my website and after doing research into fine art printing, I began creating and selling high resolution archival prints of my work in 2003. That same year I started showing and selling my framed images at permanent gallery space in Asheville, NC, where I am still represented. I have told them they’re never getting rid of me. They seem OK with this.

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The Foreclosure Crisis

3d modeling is how each object in an image is created. The process involves using computer programs (3DS Max, for example) that allow the artist to create digital wireframe objects. The wireframes are created with points or curves, defined by math and visible on the computer screen in a simulated 3-dimensional space. Models can be made in different ways, by starting with a basic polygonal shape and modifying it, (like sculpting with clay) or by creating outlines and then volumizing and detailing the object (like creating a form for papier mache).

The wireframe objects include everything and anything you see when you look at my images—clouds, flowers, mountains, trees, people, animals—everything begins with a digital wireframe. I either create, purchase, or re-use items that I’ve already made as my first step in making an image. In the sample image at the right, I had to make a teacup, a spoon, a table, a napkin, a raft… all the things that make up the content of the scene.

The process of creating 3D renderings incorporates various traditional artistic techniques, but relies on pixels instead of paint, the computer mouse or a digitizing tablet instead of a brush, and digital geometry instead of clay. Almost everyone has seen 3D renderings these days; whether it’s an architectural walkthrough on television or a modern animated movie. The technology is used in product design and production, advertising, medical visualization, and dozens of other industries.

Basically, it’s a lot like using the computer to create a diorama, except instead of putting it in a shoebox like you did in school, you build the pieces and assemble the scene in the computer. It all starts just like any other work of art does. With an idea, and a plan. Or something like a plan. In my case, I start with a sketch, where I rough out the composition and get a general idea of the color palette and major parts of the image. Once that’s reasonably in place, I get started on modeling.

Once completed, the wireframe objects are then wrapped or filled with color and texture created specifically for that object. The software allows the artist to specify exactly how and where the texture material is applied to each object in a scene. As part of the material, simulated or physical texture—called bump maps or displacement maps—can be added to lend further realism to an object. Bump maps take what would ordinarily be a completely flat surface and either change the physical geometry of the item, or simulate that change, to give a surface detail features like cracks, or grit, or lumps. General surface properties can be definied and modified, making the material shiny, reflective, illuminated, or translucent, for example. Materials can be made from scratch in a paint program or can be modified from photographs, or they can be built using mathematical functions from within the software. Material selection is the most critical part of any of my images. A relatively simple model can be made into something extraordinary by correctly creating and applying the right material.

To read more about Cynthia’s artistic process, please go to Cynthia’s web site posted at the top of this page.

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Collector’s Choice: Gray Artus


http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/gray-artus.html

 

imageThe necessity to create is an obvious driving passion immediately visible when seeing Gray Artus’ work for the first time. His paintings and  photographs reveal a deep urgency to express profound feelings and evoke hidden longings.  Each piece, whether a photograph of a North Carolina beach after dusk, or a painted bird at rest in its natural habitat, conveys the mystery of the intangible behind the visible. 

Artus Grey is a largely self-taught artist currently living in Asheville, North Carolina. His ability to capture human emotion through passages of stark contrast and subtle texture overlays carries his pieces from the obvious subject and beyond, into a deeper dream state, where one feels the reality of the vision with an incessant ache.

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ARTIST STATEMENT  BY ARTUS GRAY

I lost myself so long ago… I chased plastic dreams I thought would bring happiness. Where did the time go? I lost myself in this world and at times I lost my mind… When I paint I find it again and my thoughts are so clear.
I paint to have freedom… Freedom from this world of falling short of others expectations… Freedom from the anxiety that oppressed me and formed me into a soul that was unrecognizable.

I am a photographer to see… see the beauty in this world. There are days it’s hard to find but I see it… it’s there in a sunrise or maybe in a smile.
I am a photographer to see… see the loneliness in the world. It’s never hard to find… A teardrop falls silently to the earth.
I am an artist because there are no words to express how I feel.
I am an artist created to be free…my soul soars… it’s the way God created me.

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BIO
I am Gray Artus a painter, photographer and fine artist from Asheville, North Carolina. This is just my self diagnosis but I must have ADD. I jump from photography to painting then to a different painting and back again. Its an endless circle of creativity here!
Art is what I think about when I get up in the morning and when I go to bed at night and all day in between… its my passion!
Artus’ work is currently displayed nationally and internationally in private collections and has been used as album art and on various regional websites. 
You can view his work at Fineartamerica.com at the link at the top of the page.

 

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