Miguel Velit and His Completed Sculpture


 

 

Here’s Miguel Velit, in triumph before the sculpture he completed  at the beginning of August at Josephine Sculpture Park in Frankfort, Kentucky where he was a guest artist.

 

 

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Miguel Velit is a Sculptor from Lima, Peru. His sculptures include a whimsical but powerful exploration of dynamic space. I have known him since our days together at Vermont Studio  in Johnson Vermont and his work has always been a testimonial to the relentless pursuit of art and its ability to influence and alter the world.

 

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This Summer, he was  in residence at the nearby Josephine Sculpture Park in Frankfort, Kentucky as a guest artist where he was working on a variety of large metal sculptures from scrap metal gathered from local metal scrap metal yards. He has completed his sculpture and I have included photos of the results.

 

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Miguel has built sculptures all over the world for a variety of parks, interior and exterior spaces. Countries where his work is on exhibit include China, Poland, the United States, Argentina, Mexico and of course, his beloved hometown Lima, Peru.

 

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Embracing a vigorous investigation of building materials and spatial explorations, Miguel builds sculptures that are arrestingly confident, playful and memorable.

 

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Kentucky was honored to host Miguel as he continues his lifelong  artistic quest.

 

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Transformation


Fine art and fashion go hand in hand. Click here to see today’s latest fashion creation by Jan Kirstein. 

 

 

“Wild and Wicked 2” by Jan Kirstein. Click images to see enlargements.

 

Writing advice from Coco Chanel

by Elaine Bennett

 

Coco Chanel
Gabrielle Bonheur “Coco” Chanel in 1928, Public Domain,

No doubt you’ve heard of Coco Chanel, the French fashion designer who liberated women from stiff, formal clothing and popularized the still-ubiquitous “Little Black Dress.” Her fashion advice remains legendary—just Google “remove one accessory” and your screen will fill with blogs and articles quoting or misquoting her famous dictum

“Before you leave the house, look in the mirror and take one thing off.”

But while Chanel intended that as fashion advice, I think it works just as well for writers.

How many adverbs have you used? Surely you don’t need them all. And those adjectives—wouldn’t a few descriptive phrases enliven your work more?

Of course, before you can revise—your outfit or your writing—you have to create it first. Write until you’ve finished the draft. But before it “leaves the house,” give it a good once-over. Is every word, every sentence, necessary? If it isn’t—copy, cut, and paste. Slap it into the writer’s equivalent of a jewelry box, the Outtakes file.

More advice from Coco Chanel

“Take one thing off” may be Chanel’s most-quoted piece of advice. But I found another one I like quite a lot in this slideshow from Australian Vogue:

“In order to be irreplaceable one must be different.”

While we’re on the subject of revising, I’d lop off “In order” at the top of that sentence. But let’s not blame Chanel; perhaps it got added in translation.

“To be irreplaceable, one must be different.” I tell my writers a variation of this all the time. And my clients, too. They talk about subjects that thousands—millions—of people have already talked about: diversity, ethics, management. How can they differentiate themselves from the crowd? By weaving their own stories into the mix. No one else has had yourexperiences, has your perspective.

Make your communications irreplaceable—and your ideas memorable—by being your own, unique self. (Little Black Dress optional.)


Writing is just the first part of the process. Revising—that’s the secret sauce that gives your writing zing. Join my free webinar on revising.

 

 

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Laura Iniesta


 

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The Spanish painter, Laura Iniesta, was born in Barcelona in 1955 and her first exhibitions were in this city.

 

She has exhibited and lived in America for a long period following her life in Barcelona, during which she  was impacted with its exuberant tropics.  This experience reflects positively on her work enhancing her propensity for abundant and verdant expression through paint.

 

 

Her Mediterranean heart brought her to a return to Barcelona, where her studio was installed. From there, her works for many exhibitions and projects at national and international levels were profusely created.

 

 

Her work expands with grand gestural movements and markings of paint and drawing materials, directly establishing a visual impact of balance and enormous aesthetic strength. In the presence of Laura’s paintings, the viewer becomes greatly moved by the monumental movements of painterly gesture, making it impossible to remain indifferent to the painting’s presence.

 

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Collector’s Choice: Alan Jeffries


 

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Alan Jeffries

“Although I have had a lifelong interest in art, I only started painting in 2008. I am self-taught. My work is influenced by traditional Abstract Expressionism and Neo-Expressionism. I work primarily in oils.

I agree with the critic who once said that a painting does not have to be “about” anything other than the process of its own creation. I am also guided by two quotes. The first is from Jean-Michel Basquiat: “I start a picture and I finish it. I don’t think about art while I work. I try to think about life.” The second is from Chuck Close: “Inspiration is for amateurs; the rest of us just show up and get to work.”

I never begin with a plan or image in mind. I simply start applying paint to canvas until something interesting happens. Then that “something” suggest the next thing, and the next, and so on until a kind of internal logic emerges which I then attempt to follow. I never know what the finished product will be, so I would characterize each painting as a visual record of the interplay between randomness and control.”  Alan Jeffries.

 

 

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The exuberance, energy and enthusiasm emitted from the paintings of Alan Jeffries is primal, direct and intuitively directed. His bold strokes of paint overlapping seas of texture and painted surfaces evokes a world where spontaneity rules.

Through the paint, Alan uncovers a smoldering furnace of color, form and line emitting compositions of provocatively evolved balance and innovative construction. His use of color appears as original, heartfelt and natural.

The fact that these paintings have originated from an artist who is “untrained” is a testament to the ability of this artist to harness the realizations of the human eye, heart and soul.

By moving through the applications of painterly surfaces and terrains, Alex reveals an inner world of high impact and power.

Written by Janis Kirstein

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