Discoveries in 20th Century Expressionism


Have you ever seen these abstract works of art before? These pieces are all from the Yale University Art Gallery. Have a look!

Piede Vicentino (Vicentine Foot), from the series Codex Coner

The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States, a joint initiative of the Trustees of the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection and the National Gallery of Art, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Institute for Museum and Library Services
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From the exhibition Many Things Placed Here and There: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection at the Yale University Art Gallery:

Though Herbert Vogel knew Michael Goldberg from the 1950s New York art scene, the Vogels did not begin acquiring Goldberg’s work until the 1970s, at which point the couple bought work directly from the art­ist’s studio in the Bowery. Goldberg experimented with dynamic gesture, vibrant color, and emotionally charged abstraction, all defining characteristics of Abstract Expressionism, which swept through New York after the Second World War. In Piede Vicentino, broad, bold brushstrokes and strong diagonals infuse the work with pervasive energy. The title of the series from which this work comes is taken from an early sixteenth-century album created by a Florentine architect, and famously copied by Michelangelo, that illustrates details of Roman buildings.

 

 

Continue reading “Discoveries in 20th Century Expressionism”

Seas of the Moon by Painter Sandy Miller Sasso


 

THE RECENT WORK OF SANDY SASSO

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The paintings and drawings of Sandy Sasso reign in the forces of nature to tell a story of mysterious talismans, presenting a reality woven from metaphoric symbolism and imagination. The results form an astute observation of a current collective consciousness and state of mind of our world today.

Jan Kirstein

 

“I am still haunted by the names of the seas of the moon… Sea of Crisis, Sea of Rains, Sea of Tranquility, Sea of Cold…. they sum up my response to the atmosphere of fragility and uncertainty that permeates the world now. I ordered a 3-D moon the size of a tennis ball that I suspend in still life set ups of illuminated objects from the woods around our house.”

Sandy Miller Sasso

 

 

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Sea of Crisis II
22x5inches, charcoal/conte on paper, 2016

 

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Sea of Rains
22x5inches, charcoal, conte on paper, 2016
This drawing is currently in Ways of Seeing, a traveling exhibit organized by the Kentucky Arts Council. Sites are Hindman; Richmond; Williamsburg, Somerset, and Madisonville.

 

 

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Beech Leaves
22 . 4.5 inches,charcoal and conte on paper, 2015
Private collection

 

“I have been working on a series of paintings and drawings united by the theme of the mares, or seas of the moon. Several of these paintings were on exhibit in Paducah, KY; at the Legacy exhibit of past and present art teachers at the Paducah School of Art and Design, and in Different Times Different Places, a group show at the Ruth Baggett Gallery. The entire body of work has just been shown at the Murray Art Guild in March, 2017 in Sea of Crisis, a solo show.”

 

Click thumbnails to enlarge

 

 

Artist Sandy Sasso lives with her husband, artist Paul Sasso in a lovely home they designed and built, surrounded by their own splendidly created gardens in Western Kentucky. Their daughter, now grown is Maggie Sasso, also an artist.

Sandy has also taught as a high school visual arts teacher in Murray Kentucky, and most recently taught a painting workshop at Arrowmont School of Art and Craft in Gatlinburg, TN in early November, 2016.

“It was really great to teach again, and the students and the facilities at Arrowmont were all exceptional,” she says. “The horrible fire happened two weeks after I was there. Though three buildings on campus were lost the studio/lab buildings are intact and all classes are on schedule for 2017. ”

 

 

To see more art works by Sandy Miller Sasso, visit her artist website at www.sandymillersasso.com

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Debora Stewart


www.deborastewart.com

 

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Debora Stewart

Artist Statement

For most of my life my artwork was very realistic. I devoted most of my time to rendering figures, portraits and flowers representationally. I became frustrated and stuck and wanted to go beyond realism. I entered into a period of searching and experimentation.

 

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I had always been drawn to abstraction so I began to experiment. I cut images apart, looked at things differently, drew from intuition, began to use color more expressively and tried new materials. I took small steps and grew more excited as I began to develop my own process of abstraction. Early works were mostly charcoal and pastel. I combined various underpaintings to create an abstract composition for my pastels. Pastel soon translated to mixed media acrylic paintings. Now I am in the process of teaching others and am excited that so many also want to go on the same journey.

 

Click on thumbnails to enlarge.

My current theme is titled Return to the Garden. I am revisiting themes of my past which include plants, flowers and figures. I have returned to drawing from life and am combining these drawings with my abstractions for a new vision. My new paintings and pastels are based on drawings created in gardens. Plants and flowers are drawn from life. This is truly a meditative experience for me and allows me to center myself. I take these drawings back to my studio and they are used as the foundation for subsequent works. I follow their lines, remember the day and recreate garden impressions in my abstractions. In many ways I am creating an inner garden for myself. The garden is symbolic of emergence, growth, change and the fleeting beauty of life.

 

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Pastels en Perigord

Event Dates: 7/1/2016 – 8/1/2016

St. Aulaye, France
I have been invited to exhibit three of my pastels paintings in the upcoming Pastels en Perigord which will be held in St. Aulaye, France during July and August of 2016.

 

Click on thumbnails to enlarge

Everything I do is just an excuse to play with line and color. It doesn’t matter whether it is non-objective, bouquets, figures, animals or most recently these abstracted landscapes. Making lines with charcoal is probably the most fun I have in my art. I love the act of taking a stick of charcoal and creating lines on paper. I love the tactile feel and even the sound of charcoal on paper. Some lines may have some reference to something I have seen and others are lines I feel need to be there. Some are also internal surges of energy (too much coffee).

 

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Color is always an experiment and challenge. More subtlty is what I am after now. More variation in hue and value. These abstracted memory scapes are an excuse to play with variations in blues and greens. Those colors do lend themselves to landscapes. I’m not a landscape artist but I am inspired by all that I see and experience. I am surrounded by fields, water, sky, trees and earth. I can allow this daily experience to influemce my line and color choices. Last year I was inspired by the rocky coast of Maine and did a few abstractions based on that experience. The Arizona desert has inspired more subtle color choices. I want to let nature inspire me and influence me. I don’t want to render anything I see in a realistic way. I allow it to enter into me, mix with my own emotions and experience and come out onto the paper or canvas.

 

 

I would like to give special thanks to Debora Stewart for allowing me to feature her art work on KIRSTEINFINEART.

 

 

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