Teri Dryden: Collages to Die For


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For years in Louisville, I saw the collages of Teri Dryden, and was riveted by her uncanny ability to place together every piece of torn paper to create a perfectly unified field of incongruent, yet visually connected torn scraps. Her collages vibrate with decisively placed color and shape. Symphonies of seemingly random, yet innately balanced pieces of torn edges, rough contrasting pigments and typography sing a hallelujah chorus of undeniable strength and boldness.

 

Janis Kirstein

 

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“i plunge into each piece of work as if it were an adventure into the unknown. with no specific outcome in mind, i respond to the changes in the picture as i explore and interact with materials by layering paint and paper, scratching, sanding and marking, creating open spaces, altering and adjusting,” Teri says.

 

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“i move between intuition and logic; chaos and order. being aware and open, taking risks with the materials, as well as the struggle itself allows me to be in the moment to reflect and interpret a history that evolves on the canvas before my eyes.

 

 

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Teri Dryden’s unorthodox path to becoming an artist began with immersion in an ancient art form in which she, herself was the medium. A theatre major at Towson University in Baltimore, Maryland, she excelled in physical expression and comedy. At the urging of an instructor, she auditioned and won a coveted spot as one of the few female clowns in the Ringling Brothers’ Barnum and Bailey Circus. For two unforgettable years, she performed in every state in the U.S. in one of the most colorful and visually stimulating environments imaginable.

 

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She then moved to Los Angeles and became an award-winning stage actress, but left the stage when her first child was born. After making beautiful fiber art for several years, Teri decided to take an art class, and discovered a latent talent and passion for painting and drawing. During a remarkably short and prolific period, she won several awards and sold dozens of paintings and drawings to rapt fans who recognized her unique sense of composition and color in dramatic florals and still-lives. She feels she has found her true aesthetic after discovering the fascinating world of mixed media and collage.

 

 

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She is a member of the collage artists of America, National Collage Society and Women Painters West. Her work is included in many private and public collections and has been exhibited in numerous solo, group and juried exhibitions across the country.

 

 

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Have a Happy July!


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Happy 4th of July to you!

I hope that you are going to have a nice, peaceful, relaxing day today. Unless, of course, you are a dog. In which case you are welcome to join my two dogs who are currently huddled in the bathroom tub, trying to escape all of the firecracker noise.

But to the point. This message is to alert you to the new opportunity to visit my newly created Kirsteinfineart Shopify Store on line: http://kirsteinfineart.myshopify.com.

 

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That being said, you have to give me credit. No pun intended. Seriously, nose around my online store. There are free tshirt opportunities, robust discount incentives, complete with sparkledy gift boxes! Woohoo! See what color can do for you.

 

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In fact, what if you go right now!  http://kirsteinfineart.myshopify.com

 

A few items from my “Chakra Meditation Series.”

Oh please! Not a snake shower curtain! Ok 😌 well there’s a lot of other stuff too.

Have a sweet holiday,

Jan Kirstein

True Inspiration: Helen Frankenthaler


 

To honor and support the Women’s March in Washington D.C. this week, I am would like to give tribute to some of my fav painters who have inspired me for a lifetime. Today it’s Helen Frankenthaler.

 

 

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Helen Frankenthaler, Europa, 1957, Oil on unsized, unprimed canvas, 70 x 54 1/2 x 2 inches (177.8 x 138.43 x 5.08 cm) © 2016 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Abstract Expressionism
Royal Academy of Arts
September 24, 2016 – January 2, 2017
This long-awaited exhibition reveals the full breadth of a movement that will forever be associated with the boundless creative energy of 1950s New York.

Traveling to:
Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Spain
February 03, 2017 – June 04, 2017

 

Hartung and Lyrical Painters
Fonds Hélène & Édouard Leclerc pour la Culture, Landerneau, France
December 11, 2016 – April 17, 2017
The exhibition positions the work of Hans Hartung with artists of the 1950’s such as Georges Mathieu, Gérard Schneider, Hantaï, and international artists from subsequent decades, including Helen Frankenthaler.

 

Women of Abstract Expressionism
The Mint Museum, Charlotte, NC
October 22, 2016 – January 22, 2017
The groundbreaking exhibition Women of Abstract Expressionism celebrates the often unknown female artists of this mid-twentieth century art movement.

Traveling to:
Palm Springs Art Museum, CA
February 18, 2017 – May 28, 2017

Originated:
Denver Art Museum, CO
June 12 – September 25, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

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A Little Plug for my Justice Collection by Janis Kirstein. To see more click here.

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Collector’s Choice: Red!


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Mark Rothko : Red Abstracts

Thanks to Azurebumble

Above:  Mark Rothko. Orange, Red, Orange. Oil on paper.

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Mark Rothko. Untitled. Oil on canvas.

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Mark Rothko. Untitled. Oil on canvas.

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Mark Rothko.  Oil on canvas.

One of the preeminent artists of his generation, Mark Rothko is closely identified with the New York School, a circle of painters that emerged during the 1940s as a new collective voice in American art. During a career that spanned five decades, he created a new and impassioned form of abstract painting. Rothko’s work is characterized by rigorous attention to formal elements such as color, shape, balance, depth, composition, and scale; yet, he refused to consider his paintings solely in these terms. He explained:

“It is a widely accepted notion among painters that it does not matter what one paints as long as it is well painted. This is the essence of academicism. There is no such thing as good painting about nothing.”

 

 

More Red Paintings

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Henri Matisse:  “The Desert:  Harmony in Red, 180 x 221 cm, 1908

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More Red Art

This set of images includes art from living artists. All of these artists have been featured on Kirsteinfinefineart. These artists include Kurt Nimmo, Rick Bennett, and Janis Kirstein.

 

Click on  thumbnails to enlarge.

Red is a color I love, but ordinarily for me, a little red goes a long way. However, all of the paintings on this series use a proportional predominance of red. Red is an assertive color that comes forward toward the viewer. It is a warm color, an assertive color, and even can be an aggressive color. Red is associated with fire, passion, heat, energy, blood, life force, and is a high impact color. Red is said to make people hungry, thus the predominance of red in fast food decor: McDonald’s, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Rally’s for examples.

Hope this blog didn’t make you too hungry!

 

Jan Kirstein

Kirsteinfineart

 

To see more of my Red Collage Series, click here and go to November Collages 2016 Gallery.

 

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Joan Mitchell


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Joan Mitchell The Last Paintings

3 February – 28 April 2012, Hauser & Wirth London, Piccadilly

‘My paintings aren’t about art issues. They’re about a feeling that comes to me from the outside, from landscape. … Paintings aren’t about the person who makes them, either. My paintings have to do with feelings’.

– Joan Mitchell, 1974

 

 

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Hauser & Wirth is proud to present an exhibition of late paintings by American Abstract Expressionist, Joan Mitchell. Created during the last decade of her life, these large-scale canvasses mark a distinct departure from her more sombre works of the early 1960s. Her late paintings, dating from 1985 to 1992, are replete with vibrant colours, energy and excitement, combining Mitchell’s admiration of the work of Van Gogh and Monet, her interest in nature and her adept skill at expressing emotions and memories.

 

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Mitchell was born in Chicago and in 1950 moved to New York where she was one of the few female artists to participate in seminal exhibitions alongside prominent Abstract Expressionists such as Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollock and Franz Kline. In 1959, Mitchell relocated to France. She stayed in Paris for eight years before she moved to Vétheuil where she remained for the last 25 years of her life, producing dynamic paintings despite such momentous events as the loss of close family, friends and her long battle with cancer that took her life in 1992.

 

 

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MITCHiv Wall 1 014

 

Like many of the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists, Mitchell was fascinated by the French countryside and the lush landscape of Vétheuil featured prominently in her late paintings. In the diptych ‘River’, a painting of the River Seine as seen from her home, Mitchell filled two canvasses with vigorous brushstrokes in an array of greens, blues, purples, reds and a swath of yellow paint crossing the bottom of the canvas to represent the river. In ‘Sunflowers’, Mitchell again used a diptych format to depict one of her most well known subjects in the twilight of its life. In a conversation with Yves Michaud, Mitchell once said, ‘Sunflowers are something I feel very intensely. They look so wonderful when young and they are so moving when they are dying…’. With ‘Sunflowers’, Mitchell worked quickly across her canvasses, expressing her intense feeling through the intense gestures that form the unrestrained and multi-coloured flowers’ blooms. Pushing the boundaries of abstract painting, both ‘River’ and ‘Sunflowers’ illustrate Mitchell’s emotional and physical recollections of the countryside she loved.

 

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The exhibition also features Mitchell’s late, purely abstract paintings. These works range in format including single canvases, diptychs and tondos. The works display a radical and free use of colour and line, as well as a confident experimentation with composition, scale and physical structure. Each painting showcases Mitchell’s mature artistic style that, over a prolific period of three decades, had fully developed into a unique personal language of colour, line and form. Together, these late paintings demonstrate what Richard Marshall describes in the exhibition’s accompanying catalogue as the artist’s ‘pure joy of putting paint to canvas’.

 

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‘Joan Mitchell. The Last Paintings’ was organised in collaboration with Cheim & Read, New York and the Joan Mitchell Foundation.

 

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MITCHiv Wall 1 002

 

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Click here to see a great video about Joan Mitchell’s Last Years and Her Painting

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MITCHiv Wall 1 007

 

 

 

 

Thanks so much for coming to my blog today. Please share your thoughts and feelings here on this page. And subscribe to Kirsteinfineart  by going to the subscribe button on the right side of this page.

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Soraya Silvestri


http://www.soraya-silvestri.fineartamerica.com

 

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Ink Paintings

 

 

For abstract artist Soraya Silvestri, nature provides the inspiration for her art and practice. If you look closely, each painting hints at a cloudy sky, a storm breaking, a mountain peak, or the cosmos. The abundance of emotion and energy in nature are echoed in her artwork.

Soraya looks to nature to find colour, pattern, and composition that she then translates to canvas in a unique and delicate way. Influenced by fearless masters of colour such as Jonas Gerard and Michael Lang, Soraya strives to create interplay of light and dark hues, experimenting with colour, form, and shadow. Smooth textures and blended colour are key elements of Soraya’s work.

Much like the masters, Soraya looks to nature to supply mood and evoke a sense of wonder and awe. The use of chiaroscuro (contrast of light and dark) is a key tool in creating this sense of grandeur and majesty.

 

Click to enlarge these ink paintings

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Soraya is an artist living in Ottowa, Ontario.

 

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Collector’s Choice: Sylvia Brestel


www.feltedfeater.com

 

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Sylvia Brestel

Elegant Wearable Art, Hand Felted Silk and Wool

On a hot July day in 2012…

I sat at my kitchen table to make my first hand felted bowl from wool. The sensation of manipulating the soft, natural fibers in my hands seemed comfortably familiar to me and led me to ask “what if I tried this…or this…”

As a child, I enjoyed working with pieces of this and that – cloth, paper, thread, yarn, and anything else that I could find to keep my hands busy creating dolls, clothes for my dolls, wall hangings, pillows, and little bags.
 

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Time appears to stand still while I am intently putting pieces in place to create a whole, especially if the work involves hand stitching or beading. Creating art is a very deliberate and meditative act of process. Like writing music or putting a puzzle together.

Felting is a lot about putting pieces together to create a whole. Throughout my handmade journey, the “what ifs” continued. I explored nuno felting, dyeing and painting and shibori binding using techniques of hand tying and hand sewing. I applied what I had learned from working with fiber and other media and researched information online. The processes of surface design and ways to create texture are abundant.

 

 

When I cook, I scan the recipe and then do my own thing adding a little of this and a little of that. Cooking, like many things I enjoy, is intuitive to me. A piece of this, a piece of that.

For me, working with fiber is very much about using this and that to create a whole. Small pieces that have the opportunity to fit together to create a design that wasn’t there just a few minutes ago. It is amazing to watch as seemingly disparate parts come together into a unified whole. Sort of like working on a puzzle that has many, many possible outcomes. Each idea delightful simply in the potential it invites.

 

 

 

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It is my hope that my art will resonate my love of the process of working with fiber as I follow along the pathways of “what if…” one small piece at a time.

When you wear my fiber art, it is my wish that you will be wrapped in the happiness from my heart that is lovingly hand felted into each piece.

 

 

 

 

KIRSTEINFINEART gives many thanks to Sylvia Brestel for sharing her work with us. For more informative features on some of today’s best contemporary artists, go to the bottom of this page and click the subscribe button. Thanks so much!