The Art of Dreams


Dreams form one of the main pathways to the workings and special messages from the subconscious mind. Dream journals are one of the many ways to uncover the world that goes beyond our concrete reality and merges with a montage of ethereal symbols and realities to convey  new meaning in our daily lives.
Here are some very strange and unique artistic captures of this other world we fall through while in our sleep.
Jan Kirstein

durer-dream-banner

Half our dayes wee passe in the shadowe of the earth, and the brother of death exacteth a third part of our lives.

(Thomas Browne, On Dreams)

…night after night, with calm incuriousness we open the door into that ghostly underworld, and hold insane revels with fantastic spectres, weep burning tears for empty griefs, babble with foolish laughter at witless jests, stain our souls with useless crime, or fly with freezing blood from the grasp of an unnamed dread ; and, with the morning, saunter serenely back from these wild adventures into the warm precincts of the cheerful day, unmoved, unstartled, and forgetting.

(Elizabeth Bisland, Dreams and their Mysteries)

Dreams have long proved a fertile ground for human creativity and expression, and no less so than in the visual arts, giving rise to some of its most arresting images. In addition to the many and varied dreams so important to religion and myth there has emerged, in the last few centuries since the birth of Romanticism, an exploration of the more personal dream-world. Indeed, with its link to the unconscious, the form has perhaps proved the perfect vehicle for those artists looking to surface that which lies submerged – desire, guilt, fear, ambition – to bring to light the truth the waking mind keeps hid.

No doubt, also, artists have been attracted to the challenge of giving form to something so visually intangible as a dream, a challenge taken up in many ways through the centuries. More often than not there appears the sleeping body itself, with the dream element incorporated in a variety of ways. Common is for the dream sequence to appear in a totally separate part of the image, as if projected on the walls of the sleeping mind: often in the midst of that familiar floating cloud, but also as emerging from nearby objects or events of the day (see the Toyokuni image below) . Also common, particularly in the depiction of nightmares, is for the figures of the dream to simply appear as though in the room with the sleeper, often directly upon the body itself (see the Fuseli below). With the advent of photography, and the potential of double exposures, we see also a different way of trying to capture that intangibility of the dream image. With both the Grandville and Redon images featured, and the work of the Surrealists they anticipate, we see a different approach entirely, one which looks past the sleeper to focus solely on the imagery of the dream itself, and in the process perhaps giving a more true impression of the strangeness and otherworldliness which so often characterises the dream experience.

The Nightmare, by Henry Fuseli (1781). Perhaps Fuseli’s best known work, it has been copied by other artists, including many engravings such as this one by Thomas Burke – Source.
Dream-land (ca. 1883), an etching by S.J. Ferris after a painting by C.D. Weldon – Source.
El sueño del caballero, or The Knight’s Dream (ca. 1655), by Antonio de Pereda – Source.
The Jockey’s Dream (ca. 1880), published by Currier & Ives – Source.
A Nightmare (19th century), by E. Vavasseur – Source.
Nightmare (1810), by Jean Pierre Simon – Source: Wellcome Library.
Job’s Evil Dreams (1805), by William Blake, from a series of 19 watercolours illustrating the Book of Job that Blake painted in 1805-6 for Thomas Butts – Source.
A Child Dreams of the Passing of Time (17th century), by Boetius Adamsz Bolswert – Source.
The Soldiers Dream of Home (ca. 1861), by unknown artist – Source.
A Dream of Crime & Punishment (1847), by J.J. Grandville. Predating Dostoevsky’s book by some 20 years, it shows “the dream of an assassin overcome by remorse” – Source.
Dream Vision; A Nightmare (1525), by Albrecht Dürer: a watercolour and accompanying text describing an apocalyptic dream Dürer had on the night of 7-8th June 1525. The text readsIn 1525, during the night between Wednesday and Thursday after Whitsuntide, I had this vision in my sleep, and saw how many great waters fell from heaven. The first struck the ground about four miles away from me with such a terrible force, enormous noise and splashing that it drowned the entire countryside. I was so greatly shocked at this that I awoke before the cloudburst. And the ensuing downpour was huge. Some of the waters fell some distance away and some close by. And they came from such a height that they seemed to fall at an equally slow pace. But the very first water that hit the ground so suddenly had fallen at such velocity, and was accompanied by wind and roaring so frightening, that when I awoke my whole body trembled and I could not recover for a long time. When I arose in the morning, I painted the above as I had seen it. May the Lord turn all things to the best – Source.
Yume no ukihashi, or The Bridge of Dreams (1854), by Utagawa Toyokuni – Source.
The Artist’s Dream (1840), by George H. Comegys. The artist, with his head down on a table in his studio, perhaps seeking divine intervention, is having a vision of great artists from the past, such as: Sir Joshua Reynolds, Rubens, Rembrandt, Titian, Leonardo Da Vinci, Raphael Michelangelo, and others – Source.
Legend of St Francis: Dream of the Palace (1297 – 1299), by Giotto – Source.
The Orangerie;—or—the Dutch Cupid Reposing After the Fatigues of Planting, depicting William V, Prince of Orange, as a fat, naked Cupid (1796), by James Gillray – Source.
Tatiana Larina’s dream (1891), by Ivan Volkov – Source.
The Orphan’s Dream (19th century), by James Elliott – Source.
Dreaming of Santa Claus (ca. 1897), by William H. Rau – Source.
A Verger’s Dream: Saints Cosmas and Damian Performing a Miraculous Cure by Transplantation of a Leg (ca. 1495), by Masterof Los Balbases, – Source: Wellcome Library.
Tako to ama, or The Dream of the Fisherman’s Wife (1814), an erotic ukiyo-e by Hokusai, from the book Kinoe no Komatsu (English: Young Pines), a three-volume book of shunga erotica first published in 1814. For an English translation of the rather racy text see the link to the source – Source.
Jacob’s Dream (late 16th century), by Adam Elsheimer – Source.
The Dream of King Nebuchadnezzar (10th century), Staatsbibliothek Bamberg, Msc. Bibl. 22, fol. 31v – Source.
The Dream of Pilate’s Wife (ca. 1879), by Gustave Doré. According to Matthew 27:19, While Pilate was sitting in the judgment hall, his wife sent him a message: “Have nothing to do with that innocent man, because in a dream last night, I suffered much on account of him.” – Source.
‘Emperor Godaigo, dreaming of ghosts in his palace (1890), by Ogata Gekkō – Source.
Dream (1878 – 1882), by Odilon Redon – Source.
Little Nemo comic strip, by Winsor McCay (1906). This particular strip was from a European edition and never printed in the US – Source
.

Miroslava Rakovic: Dreams and Perceptions


IMG_1895

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel…..” said the revered writer Maya Angelou, who passed away yesterday at age 84, leaving us her legacy of great poetic writings of wisdom.

 

This quote by the late great writer Maya Angelou directly applies to the paintings of Serbian artist Miroslava Rakovic.

In her paintings, Miroslava is following feelings and dreams. In her collages, or other works where she uses different media on paper, canvas or in digital work, she reflects a strong symbolic character; an iconographic search that follows the changes in her personal life.

 

Click on thumbnails to enlarge.

 

IMG_1894

Click thumbnails to enlarge

Biography

Miroslava Rakovic was born in Novi Sad, Serbia (former Yugoslavia).
She graduated at the Academy of Art Niv Sad . She works in the area of illustration, design and painting, and currently she is a professor of graphic design.
Her work has been display in a selection of various exhibitions in Serbia.

 

E374C3E9-80AB-4BF7-A36D-91B8B73035CC-838-000000849B335A7C.jpeg

 

 

Contact artist:

 

http://www.arteafk.com/miroslava-rakovic-art

Nancy Hillis: Unleashing Your Creativity


9635FCA0-AA17-4BD6-84EC-B2FD52AEEF24-321-000000248C71FB6A

www.nancyhillis.com

 

Beneath the surface of these paintings by Nancy Hillis, there lies a secret key to unlocking the viewer’s subconscious mind. Just try gazing at these works and see what happens. For me, these images  ignited the emergence of a new rush of positive dreams, I realized when I woke up the following morning.  I hadn’t dreamed like that for many years. In fact, I had become virtually unable to remember my dreams upon waking.  For me, it would seem that these paintings acted upon my mind as a catalyst for igniting the subconscious mind.

Janis Kirstein

 

 

Invitation to The Artist’s Journey

“I have been an existential psychiatrist and artist for over 20 years and through this work I have learned that the secret to creating expressively alive paintings is by trusting yourself. My vision and the work of my life in art and psychiatry is helping others to trust themselves and to create meaningful lives through their work. Take the plunge and start on your own path towards making the work of your life. Show us what you love!”

Nancy Hillis

Click on thumbnails to enlarge

 

“The art of activating the canvas and bringing your painting to life with your own personal lexicon of mark making, expressive gestures and brushwork is nothing short of miraculous.

To create authentic and alive abstract paintings that are unique to you and your own vision is the ultimate attainment for an artist and yet the most elusive.

One issue is that you can get stuck repeating what’s worked before in your work. Another issue is trying to recreate what you love about other artists’ work.

I’ve found myself in both situations. When I finished my residency in psychiatry at Stanford I became fascinated with abstract painting. I felt that it was a mirror into the artist’s inner world, a potent and unique personal expression of the artist.”

 

5C909264-7CE0-49DB-A906-D66C91117C73-321-0000002570557D02

 

 

 

 

7884B915-1174-46EE-B8BF-E828E78EE21C-321-0000002621A10A23

 

“I loved attending museums and galleries that featured abstract artists, in particular abstract expressionist work. I admired the museum exhibitions with works of Cy Twombley, Joan Mitchell and Helen Frankenthaler. I’d feel excited to go home and try to create paintings as raw, immediate and expressive as theirs! I wanted to paint works that astonished me. I wanted my art to mean something.”

I wanted to breathe life into my paintings

“The day I finished my residency in psychiatry I started creating abstract paintings. I didn’t know what I was doing but I’ve come to learn that this is a good thing. Saying this brings to mind the book Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind where Shunryu Suzuki said “In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s there are few.” Cultivating an open mind and maintaining the teachable spirit of a beginner is a potent practice for artists at every stage of development.”

Being An Artist Is About ‘Not Knowing’

“One of the things I’ve learned on this journey is that being an artist is about continually evolving. It’s about searching and finding your way as you create. It’s about experimentation.”

 

In this video, Nancy explains the benefits of specific steps in painting for allowing  the development of an open mind.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Manifesting a Dream


 

Vision Board Project completed by Janis Kirstein at a Spirit of Sophia Workshop guided by artist April Martin in Spring of 2016.

Is it possible to manifest a dream with just the power of intention, desire, vision boards, visions, and creativity?

This is my vision: to be able to visit Paris. What is your vision? Dream and tell! Did yours come true? Tell us your story!  Shown here is my Dream, starting with a vision board I made in a Spirit of Sophia workshop under the artistic tutaledge of artist April Martin.

 

And yesterday, after an inspiring day with guest writer Paula D’ Arçy at another enlightening Spirit of Sophia event,  my Paris dream has been reignited! What a profoundly inspiring day we had with Paula as she led us through insightful and uplifting vision for our future. As for her Paris trip, check it out.

MEET PAULA:
Paula D’Arcy, a writer, retreat leader, and conference and seminar speaker, travels widely in the United States, Canada, and abroad. She is also President of Red Bird Foundation, which supports the growth and spiritual development of those in need as well as those invested in the opening of the heart and the healing of this world.
A former psychotherapist who ministered to those facing issues of grief and loss, Paula worked with the Peale Foundation, founded by Dr. Norman Vincent Peale, from 1980 until his death in 1993, and has written ten books. Today her work includes leading workshops and retreats related to spirituality, writing, women’s gatherings,( including Women’s Initiation and Rites of Passage), and creating venues where men and women experience an opening of the heart and a change in their way of being in the world. In recent years she has teamed with Richard Rohr to present seminars on the Male/Female Journey and Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life (for tapes from the conference on Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life and to purchase Paula’s books, click here.)
Paula also serves as adjunct faculty at Oblate School of Theology in San Antonio, TX and Seton Cove Spirituality Center in Austin, TX.
Award: RED FIRE selected as one of the Best Spiritual Books of 2001, by Spirituality and Health.

For more info, contact:  http://www.redbirdfoundation.com/about/

IMG_1133

 

Just a few of Paula’s Books:

 

 

 

IMG_1137.PNG

img_1136

Vision of Spirit of Sophia

Women will be empowered spiritually, therefore bringing strength and wisdom to their families and communities, resulting in a more compassionate world.

http://spiritofsophia.orgorg/
Director: Dana Sue Walker

 

 

My Dream Of Paris…
By Janis Kirstein

img_1112

Click on thumbnails to enlarge.

Click here to see these listed items. https://www.redbubble.com/people/janiskirstein/works/25834424-a-night-in-paris?asc=u&ref=recent-owner

 

 

BLOG


Abstract stone and leaveslighterThoughts, Dreams, Reflections, Analysis, Discussion, Instruction, Information all here with the Janis KirsteinFineArt Blog.

Source: BLOG

“Want Your Children to Survive The Future? Send Them to Art School” by @dustintimbrook https://medium.com/@dustintimbrook/want-your-children-to-survive-the-future-send-them-to-art-school-c88600146606#.cnxnq23gb

How to Raise a Creative Child. Step One: Back Off http://nyti.ms/1nv0ZIj

 

 

I Can’t Stop Thinking About This Drawing by a Man With No Hands or Feet http://www.vulture.com/2016/01/i-cant-stop-thinking-about-this-drawing.html?mid=twitter-share-vulture via vulture