Make a Statement


 

Statement Masks 25% OFF LIMITED TIME OFFER. https://shop.kirsteinfineart.com and go to Statement Masks Collection.

❤ Why follow an ocean of bland white face masks?  Speak your truth with your own beautifully designed statement face mask.

When I first began seeing the COVID19 sweeping across the globe, I noticed that country after country showed oceans of people wearing uniform white masks (when they weren’t practicing social distancing or in quarantine). I was kind of curious as to what kind of face parafernalia our people of the U.S.A. would come up with. I just knew Americans would come up with everything from outrageous to hilarious, and they surely have. This is not to say that I am not also deeply aware of the suffering and strife involved in the COVID19 Pandemic which is truly sad indeed. But American originality and thinking outside the box has not failed us in this situation.

True to form, our resourceful Americans came up with every kind of face contraption you could imagine. I saw a post on Facebook where someone had taken photos of all the hilarious mask get-ups people around in our country had assembled for themselves. There was the photo of someone strapping an athletic shoe to their face, their nose and mouth pressed into the shoe interior and the outer tread of the shoe sole facing the menacing virus.

Then in another post I saw someone with an umbrella strapped to their shoulders and a large transparent plastic bag draped from it’s opened coverage. Or there’s the one of a birthday party hat strapped to the face, point out to the world and round hat rim covering the mouth and nose.

So I began to wonder what other kinds of innovations would emerge in mask design here in the U.S.A. And of course I wanted to try the challenge myself, which you can see displayed in my new mask collection.

The first part people don’t like about wearing a mask is that it covers their mouth and nose. While the purpose of the mask requires this, I resolved to have my masks make a statement of uplifting hope to allow people to voice their statement and to provide a counterbalance to all the fear and despair many are feeling at this time.

 

I chose flowers as emblems of the feminine goddesses of love, peace, nature and beauty. These designs are all taken from flowers from my yard this Spring. The Iris were planted last Fall when a dear friend of mine retired from professional Iris gardening and gave me my choice of bulbs from her great Iris collection. I can’t wait for the next bloom so I can photograph it and create another mask design. I am also making other items as well as you can see on KIRSTEINFINEART.

And I also wanted the mask to make a statement. That way, even though the mouth is covered, you are still showing your voice.

This special collection of KIRSTEINFINEART face masks comes in a variety of statement designs on your choice of cotton, lycra or spandex. or other These dust-proof masks will protect you from dust, bacteria, pollution, allergies, cold, viral flu, fog and danger, industrial emission, vehicle exhaust, passive smoking, etc.

 😁  These masks are NOT N95 grade masks and are for ordinary everyday wear only.  

25% OFF ALL MASKS LIMITED TIME OFFER-MAY11. AT KIRSTEINFINEART. Code MASKUP!

 

Dress from The Iris Collection.

Any questions for me? Any kind of mask you’d like to see? Maybe a different flower? Or color? Let me know in the comments below!

Collages by Lee McKenna


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The collages by Lee McKenna are imbedded with a sense of the passage of time and the compression of memories as if from a dream. From the field of torn shapes emerges  the hopes and memories of a love drifting through time.

Jan Kirstein

 

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“Mystical Poems of Rumi 1”, A.J. Arberry
The University of Chicago Press, 1968

This is love: to fly to heaven, every moment to rend a hundred veils;
At first instance, to break away from breath — first step, to renounce feet;
To disregard this world, to see only that which you yourself have seen6 .
I said, “Heart, congratulations on entering the circle of lovers,
“On gazing beyond the range of the eye, on running into the alley of the breasts.”
Whence came this breath, O heart? Whence came this throbbing, O heart?
Bird, speak the tongue of birds: I can heed your cipher!
The heart said, “I was in the factory whilst the home of water and clay was abaking.
“I was flying from the workshop whilst the workshop was being created.
“When I could no more resist, they dragged me; how shall I
tell the manner of that dragging?”

 

 

 

The work of Australian artist Lee McKenna can be found here:     http://leeamckenna.bigcartel.com

Hispanic Heritage Month Celebrated in Our Classrooms


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Dawn Smith’s Spanish class and my Visual Art class joined together for a week long unit on creating paintings influenced by Mexican Alebrijes this week at Western Hills High School in Frankfort, Kentucky.  Painting and creative writing combined together for a learning experience in Social Studies, Spanish and Fashion Design.

To learn Global challenges of how to resolve conflicts, students had to work in groups and combine at least 2 animals from 2 different continents. They had to paint the animals, list their conflicts, how the animals could resolve those conflicts and capture these conflict resolutions in their choice of creative writing from poetry to dialogue to narrative writing. The writing portion was inspired by the book “Fantasy Animals” by Janis Kirstein, where a South American anteater and African lion are joined together and have to learn how to get along. This book was inspired by Mexican Alebrijes from Mexico, created with bright floral patterns in the 1930’s of conglomerations of various animals all in one being.

To see lesson plans for this unit,  go to:  https://kirsteinfineart.com/2016/07/27/lesson-plan-for-fantasy-animals/

To see the book written by Janis Kirstein inspired by Alebrijes,  go to: www.amazon.com/author/janiskirstein

 

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This Painting was inspired by Mexican Alebrijes, by Janis Kirstein in Mercedes Harn’s art class this summer. This class was for a teacher Inservice given by The Academy with the Kentucky Center for the Arts, combining the teaching of Social Studies, Visual Art and Spanish Language.