Ways to Bring Joy to Your Home


A home bursting with joy is something you can feel the instant you walk in the door. But what is it that makes a home joyful?  Check out these Houzz suggestions, then see some art suggestions to generate joy.

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Fine art for your  walls by artists left: Hyunmee Lee. Right: Helen Frankenthaler.

 

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Left: Drawing by Jan Kirstein. Top right: painting/drawing by Lingmu Meizhi. Bottom left: Painting by Hyunmee Lee.

 

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Painting by Elke Trittle.

 

 

Art by Stephan Leberloa.

Collector’s Choice: Helen Frankenthaler


“Jacob’s Ladder” by Helen Frankenthaler

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Although this painting shares a name with the biblical tale of Jacob’s dreamed ascent toward heaven, and also with an ancient Egyptian toy, Frankenthaler insisted this work had no illustrational intention: “The picture developed (bit by bit while I was working on it) into shapes symbolic of an exuberant figure and ladder, therefore Jacob’s Ladder.

Working in New York in the 1950s, Frankenthaler painted large-scale unprimed canvases on the floor to explore new ways of handling distinctively thinned paint. The artist said she borrowed from Jackson Pollock her “concern with line, fluid line, calligraphy, and … experiments with line not as line but as shape.”

 

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Helen Frankenthaler was an American abstract expressionist painter. She was a major contributor to the history of postwar American painting. Wikipedia
Died: December 27, 2011, Darien, CT
Spouse: Stephen M. DuBrul Jr. (m. 1994–2011), Robert Motherwell (m. 1958–1971)
Periods: Lyrical abstraction, Post-painterly abstraction, Color Field, Modern art, Abstract expressionism

Abstract Expressionism and the CIA


Jackson Pollock Painting

 

Stories of Interest: Abstract Expressionism and the CIA. Read these and let me know what you think. . .

http://www.openculture.com/2013/04/how_the_cia_turned_american_abstract_expressionism_into_cold_war_propaganda.htmlhttp://www.openculture.com/2013/04/how_the_cia_turned_american_abstract_expressionism_into_cold_war_propaganda.html

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/modern-art-was-cia-weapon-1578808.htmlhttp://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/modern-art-was-cia-weapon-1578808.html

 
Arshile Gorky, The Liver is the Cock’s Comb (1944), oil on canvas, 731⁄4 × 98″ (186 × 249 cm) Albright–Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York.