Have a Happy July!


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Happy 4th of July to you!

I hope that you are going to have a nice, peaceful, relaxing day today. Unless, of course, you are a dog. In which case you are welcome to join my two dogs who are currently huddled in the bathroom tub, trying to escape all of the firecracker noise.

But to the point. This message is to alert you to the new opportunity to visit my newly created Kirsteinfineart Shopify Store on line: http://kirsteinfineart.myshopify.com.

 

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That being said, you have to give me credit. No pun intended. Seriously, nose around my online store. There are free tshirt opportunities, robust discount incentives, complete with sparkledy gift boxes! Woohoo! See what color can do for you.

 

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In fact, what if you go right now!  http://kirsteinfineart.myshopify.com

 

A few items from my “Chakra Meditation Series.”

Oh please! Not a snake shower curtain! Ok 😌 well there’s a lot of other stuff too.

Have a sweet holiday,

Jan Kirstein

Collector’s Choice: Marc Chagall


 

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Marc Chagall (French, born Russia – present-day Belarus; 1887-1985): Carmen, 1966. Lithograph. Image size: 39-1/2 x 25-11/16 inches (100.5 x 65.3 cm). Created in 1966 from a maquette for Chagall’s “Triumph of Music,” a series of 3 large-scale decorations created for the Metropolitan Opera House in New York (Carmen, The Magic Flute, Romeo and Juliet). © Marc Chagall.

‘Chagall created this piece for the opera “Carmen” by George Bizet upon its opening at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. The print is a small detail from a preliminary painting of Chagall’s much larger “The Triumph of Music”, which now hangs at the Metropolitan Opera.’

“Chagall: Midsummer Night’s Dreams”
Through January 8, 2017
Carrières de Lumières, Les Baux de Provence, France
http://bit.ly/2heyQmy

Exhibition:
“Winter Exhibition 2016”
Until February 15, 2017
Gilden’s Art Gallery, London

Thanks to:  #IRequireArt @irequireart #art

 

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Born Moishe Shagal
6 July 1887 (N.S.)
Liozna, near Vitebsk, Russian Empire (present-day Belarus)
Died 28 March 1985 (aged 97)
Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France
Nationality Russian, later French
Known for Painting stained glass
Movement :  Cubism Expressionism

 
Marc Zakharovich Chagall (/ʃəˈɡɑːl/ shə-gahl,  6 July [O.S. 24 June] 1887 – 28 March 1985) was a Russian-French artist. An early modernist, he was associated with several major artistic styles and created works in virtually every artistic format, including painting, book illustrations, stained glass, stage sets, ceramic, tapestries and fine art prints.

Art critic Robert Hughes referred to Chagall as “the quintessential Jewish artist of the twentieth century” (though Chagall saw his work as “not the dream of one people but of all humanity”). According to art historian Michael J. Lewis, Chagall was considered to be “the last survivor of the first generation of European modernists”. For decades, he “had also been respected as the world’s preeminent Jewish artist”. Using the medium of stained glass, he produced windows for the cathedrals of Reims and Metz, windows for the UN, and the Jerusalem Windows in Israel. He also did large-scale paintings, including part of the ceiling of the Paris Opéra.

Before World War I, he traveled between St. Petersburg, Paris, and Berlin. During this period he created his own mixture and style of modern art based on his idea of Eastern European Jewish folk culture. He spent the wartime years in Soviet Belarus, becoming one of the country’s most distinguished artists and a member of the modernist avant-garde, founding the Vitebsk Arts College before leaving again for Paris in 1922.

He had two basic reputations, writes Lewis: as a pioneer of modernism and as a major Jewish artist. He experienced modernism’s “golden age” in Paris, where “he synthesized the art forms of Cubism, Symbolism, and Fauvism, and the influence of Fauvism gave rise to Surrealism.”  Yet throughout these phases of his style “he remained most emphatically a Jewish artist, whose work was one long dreamy reverie of life in his native village of Vitebsk.”

“When Matisse dies,” Pablo Picasso remarked in the 1950s, “Chagall will be the only painter left who understands what colour really is.”

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Marc Chagall

 

 

When You Understand the Value of Differing Opinions


‪”When you understand the  value of differing opinions, you will reap immediate value from every relationship.” Abraham Hicks

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This is just one of the valuable lessons presented in my in my parable called “Fantasy Animals,” by Janis Kirstein.   Click  here to see my Amazon page to browse and/or purchase this book for yourself or a loved one.

 

 

5 out of 5 stars Review for “Fantasy Animals” by Janis Kirstein
Reviewed By Emily-Jane Hills Orford for Readers’ Favorite

 

 

Vortex is an anteater; Scoop is a lioness. What’s unusual about the two is not that Vortex likes to count how many ants he eats each day, or that Scoop likes to measure how fast she runs because she’s the fastest runner in the jungle. What’s unusual is that Vortex the anteater and Scoop the lioness were born together, attached at the shoulder and torso. Vortex and Scoop are one, even though they’re also two different animals. And this has become a problem. While Vortex wants to eat all the ants he can, Scoop wants to run as fast as she can, so neither one is happy with how the other goes about their business. So, what do they do? Do they seek surgical separation? Or do they learn to accommodate each other and live together in harmony?

 

Author and artist Janis Adrian Kirstein has written a charming, fantastical story in Fantasy Animals (Volume 1), complete with her own illustrations. The story reads like a treasured parable, a storyteller’s treat that also teaches valuable lessons. In this case, the lessons to be learned are about understanding, cooperating, resolving differences, and learning to live together without conflict in spite of differences. Everyone is born different, unique, and we all must learn to respect these differences, not criticize them. Vortex and Scoop had to learn how to negotiate, how to find something good in each other, and how to make allowances for the other’s differences. These are important lessons for all of us, young and old, to learn over and over again. A great story to share many times.

 

Here is an excerpt from Fantasy Animals” as two animals learn to tolerate one another and their respective idiosyncrasies:

 

A MOST UNIQUE SITUATION

 

Deep in the dark jungles of the Amazon a most highly unusual birth took place in the animal kingdom of Balta. Two animals were born as one on a tremendously humid day in the middle of August.
The first of these two most unique animals was an anteater named Vortex. His name came from the noise he would make as his two foot tongue would lick up and gather multitudes of ants and stuff them into his long protruding proboscis. With loud, snorking and licking noises he would bring all ants anywhere into his wrinkly, quivering mouth. Animals for miles around could hear the great vacuum of his enormous ingestions as he would begin laboring every morning right on the dot of 6:00 a.m.
“SNORK, SNORK, SNOOOOOOOOOORK, SNORK!”
Vortex vacuumed up all the ants for miles around from the surrounding earthen ground using his tireless 24” tongue. While he did this, he also was very careful to keep very exacting accounts of precisely how many ants he devoured at any given time…..

 

 

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It’s Beginning to Look A Lot Like….


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This Holiday Season!

 

 

Here are some happy readers of my new book “Fantasy Animals.” To the left is Lucy Steilberg and Lucy Craig Steilberg from my church in Louisville, KY.  To the right is my mother,  Myrl Kirstein, who is going to be 91 years old in December and lives in Birmingham Alabama.

My mother is almost totally blind and has bravely decided to undergo eye surgery to correct her glaucoma. Please send prayers her way, as her surgery will be  December 6. Hopefully, she will be able to see much better after her surgery, which would be fitting for the woman who is responsible for teaching me to read.

Long Live Literacy!!

 

To purchase my book or see these additional products, click here

 

 

This little story provides an example of two very different animals learning to live together, work together and cooperate. What better lesson and example could you ask for in today’s world of conflict?

 

 

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Here is an excerpt from my book “Fantasy Animals.”

The first of these two most unique animals was an anteater named Vortex. His name came from the noise he would make as his two foot tongue  would lick up and gather multitudes of ants and stuff them into his long protruding proboscis. With loud, snorking and licking noises he would bring all ants anywhere into his wrinkly, quivering mouth.  Animals for miles around could hear the great vacuum of his enormous ingestions as he would begin laboring every morning right on the dot of 6:00 a.m.

“SNORK, SNORK, SNOOOOOOOOOORK,

SNORK!”

Vortex vacuumed up all the ants for miles around from the surrounding earthen ground using his tireless 24” tongue. While he did this, he also was very careful to keep very exacting accounts of precisely how many ants he devoured at any given time.

And while you might think his licking and snorking characteristics are what identified Vortex as unusual, these qualities were not, in fact, what put Vortex and his unlikely friend on the map, so to speak.

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At the same time that Vortex was born into this beautiful jungle forest, his dear companion and constant comrade, the courageous lion was born. She knew she was a queen from the day she was born and quickly became one of the fastest and fiercest animals in the entire jungle. She was known simply as Scoop.

Why Scoop, you say? Well, it was said by all the animals in her rainforest community, that she was so much faster than her prey, that she would merely spring and scoop, and her prey was already swallowed and digested.

Though lions generally populate the continent of Africa, Scoop somehow managed to arrive in the abundant rainforests of Peru in South America, along with her friend and constant companion Vortex.

So why were  these two animals so unique? You may ask. Well, here is the story I have been told by those who actually know and lived with Scoop and Vortex all the many years of their lives.

You see, these two animals were born as one. They were attached at the shoulder and torso, so that wherever one went, the other must go accordingly. No one knows why this unusual birth occurred, but animals and people from the region of Balta with firsthand experience declare that in fact, this pair was real and lived for many years in the Amazon jungle sometimes in harmony, sometimes not…

 

Get the book and find out what happens next and how these two animals work out their seemingly unresolvable problems.  click here to go to my Amazon page.

 

 

Click here to Check out these cool books at Amazon