Your Office Is for Your Employees — Give Them an Experience Worthy of Art


Thinking about renovating or even restructuring your office, or office space? Check out this story about the restructure at Artsy, and check out the visual art suggested by Kirsteinfineart! Here are a few favorites to give you some inspiration for your staff.

Art to stimulate and inspire any work environment from the Kirsteinfineart Blog.

 

 

Writing By Sean Roland, Associate Director of Experience & Operations from Artsy Blog

At Artsy, the Experience team’s mission is to envision, build, and maintain the physical and operational infrastructure as an extension and manifestation of our online brand and product. Some might ask why investing resources into creating a high quality Experience matters. My general answer is that creating impactful environments is always worthwhile as an art form, because it moves people, creates the opportunity for shared experience, and helps galvanize community.

Creating artful, innovative, and positive Experience at Artsy matters because it’s essential to achieving our mission. In order to “make all the world’s art accessible to anyone with an internet connection,” Artsy must become a powerful and positive force in the art world, which is no small feat in a highly competitive and critical landscape. The art, design, and hospitality worlds are closely aligned and constantly collaborating, so by demonstrating that we’re thinking and actively contributing to a creative discourse in all aspects of our brand, and not just our online presence, we will build trust and credibility within the world we hope to work and collaborate within.

Artsy team members — at HQ and global offices — gather weekly for catered team lunch. Stay tuned for more on our Food & Beverage program in a future post.

Our company values state that that we value “Quality Worthy of Art,” we believe that “People are Paramount,” and we strive to embody “Openness” and “Positive Energy.” We’re also constantly exploring the nexus of “Art x Science.” I believe that our physical spaces can embody these values, in much the same way our products, organizational structure, and communication style should. Intentional spatial and aesthetic decisions made with a strong point of view can provide the literal, concrete example of what our company strives to achieve in the digital world. In the past, Artsy hasn’t prioritized these elements, which makes sense. As a startup we’ve had to prioritize and allocate resources and time to where they most mattered — into our core products. But as we grow in size and visibility, our actions across diverse parts of the company will increasingly inform our social capital, and therefore our success.

To align the Experience of visiting or working at Artsy with our aesthetically and functionally mature online platform, our team is adopting an art- and hospitality-focused approach to Experience. We’ve partnered with design furniture company Hem to bring modern, fresh, and relevant design to our offices. We’ve begun designing and implementing a wellness-focused Food and Beverage program because we want to be part of a global dialog around healthy, ethical sustenance. And we’ve begun to add depth and variety to our internal events programming, so that we’re able to better create spaces and experiences that speak to the growing diversity of our team.

We decided on the above approach by first reflecting on the state of our affairs of operations and Experience at Artsy. We asked ourselves hard questions; what we were doing well, what could we do better, and where were we failing? We knew that Experience at Artsy wasn’t measuring up to the products we were putting out into the world, but we needed to tease out why. Our brainstorming yielded some big potential opportunities for improvement, so we built and ran a team-wide survey (with an 87% engagement rate), which helped us determine whether teammates agreed with our hypothesis and ultimately guided our priority setting process:

  • Optimization of systems, spaces, vendors, and information
  • Infrastructural improvements and interior design and curation
  • Diversifying our social event planning and execution
  • Building a wellness and ethically-focused Food & Beverage program
We’re lucky to have natural light permeating the entire office space, making meeting rooms brighter, more cheerful places to be.

1. Optimization of systems, spaces, vendors, and information

PICK LOW-HANGING FRUIT

Our survey results showed that first and foremost, we needed to tighten our ship. Our small team (4) was barely staying above water managing the huge array of company-wide support responsibilities — from onboarding logistics, to company-wide procurement of supplies and IT resources, to managing facilities, to food and beverage sourcing and programming. So we divided and conquered the challenges we faced, systematically addressing the failures in communication or process that were costing us time and money and keeping us from more effectively supporting the team at large.

CLEAN OUT YOUR CLOSETS

Throwing away unnecessary baggage can really help reboot an Operations team. Our closets were literally full of broken furniture and forgotten projects, because no one felt empowered to ditch them. So we did, and then we bought nice storage shelves and a ton of labeling tape. Now we have room to store supplies, which has allowed us to shift our buying habits to be more efficient and cost-effective. Figuratively, our team was also storing some skeletons of projects and proposals that hadn’t come to fruition, so there was a hint of “can’t do” instead of “let’s try it” in the air. We ditched our hangups, and reset expectations that any good idea is worth exploring and pitching to each other and leadership.

OPTIMIZE SYSTEMS, THEN GO VENDOR SHOPPING

We were constantly running out of office and food supplies. After we solved the storage issue, we built inventory and ordering systems. We trimmed the variety of things we buy, and created pars (standardized consumption data) based on observation of consumption over a period of weeks. Now that we’ve reached a steady state, meaning the basics are covered week after week, we’ve begun shopping for better vendors who will offer us wholesale relationships. This will help us simplify ordering and allow us to provide better amenities at the same cost. We no longer feel beholden to vendors who don’t want to work with us on pricing, because we now have the bandwidth to shop around. For example, we were working with a startup cleaning company with a cool interface that “spoke” our language. But our floors were filthy, so we traded them in for a more traditional company, with good results and great cost savings.

GET COZY WITH FINANCE

We spend the money, and Finance pays the bills, so it seems natural that we would constantly be in communication. But we weren’t, so important bills (like our internet!) weren’t getting paid. A little digging revealed that transitions on both our teams had put us at a distance, and we needed to reestablish clear processes by which to communicate effectively to ensure we were fulfilling our responsibilities. Now that we’ve repaired the broken communication, we’ve naturally begun collaborating on creating reporting tools to help us make smart budgeting and decisions, which is especially important given the volume of transactions that flow through our team.

LISTEN TO YOUR TEAM, AND GET CREATIVE WITH SOLUTIONS

One of the most notable results from our first survey was that team members felt unhappy about the lack of color and art in our office. We brainstormed an exciting long-term project called “Art at Artsy” with our Special Projects team. We’ve begun planning, but in the meantime we wanted to show immediate results. So we went out and bought plants. A ton of plants. A jungle. Overnight we went from a white box to a tropical haven. Everyday my team gets thanked for bringing color to the office. Never underestimate the power of affordable but impactful purchases.

What Next?

We’ve taken our first steps on a long path to transform Experience at Artsy. We hope it will become something extraordinary that parallels the journey you might take in an amazing restaurant, or at an incredible art installation. It’s an approach that is challenging yet actually pretty simple; shift your team away from a reactive, need-filling mentality to an intuiting, experience-creating mindset. Cover the basic needs and automate them whenever possible, so you can spend more time creating impactful experiences that move beyond the everyday and push your team to engage in a collaborative discourse with other parts of the company and the creative disciplines.

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Ways to Bring Joy to Your Home


A home bursting with joy is something you can feel the instant you walk in the door. But what is it that makes a home joyful?  Check out these Houzz suggestions, then see some art suggestions to generate joy.

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Fine art for your  walls by artists left: Hyunmee Lee. Right: Helen Frankenthaler.

 

Click thumbnails to enlarge.

Left: Drawing by Jan Kirstein. Top right: painting/drawing by Lingmu Meizhi. Bottom left: Painting by Hyunmee Lee.

 

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Painting by Elke Trittle.

 

 

Art by Stephan Leberloa.

How to Decorate A Living Room: Try an Artistic Gallery Wall in Your Home


“A living room is a great space to embrace thoughtful disorder, such as through an artistic gallery wall, mix-and-match throw pillows, open storage baskets and fun furniture…”  From this Houzz story on How to Decorate A Living Room.

 

 

 

Let’s Play with the Concept of a Gallery Wall in your home…

 

 

Click on thumbnails to enlarge.

Left: Painting by Nancy Hillis.  Top right: Fine art print by Jan Kirstein and bottom right: Collage by Hildy Maze. To contact Hildy Maze or Nancy Hillis with further questions, just message me. For more information about the print by Jan Kirstein click here

 

 

Another Gallery Wall in your Home:

 

 

Click on thumbnails to enlarge.

Gallery wall includes painted panels on left, by Karen Jacobs, top right image is painting on paper by Lee Brewster and the bottom right is a fine art print by Jan Kirstein. For inquiries about the work on Lee Brewster and Karen Jacobs you can contact me on this website. Also I have stories on both of these artists on this blog as well. To find out more about the fine art print by me, click here.

 

Create a gallery wall in your home. If you would like help with this fun project, just email me at janiskirstein@gmail.com, or contact me on this website. I would love to hear from you and help you out with choosing your preferences.

 

 

What It’s Like to Live in a Frank Loyd Wright House


Here is a story about one of my favorite architects along with some art suggestions that would work with the Prairie Style. 

 

 

 

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To find out more about this print by Jan Kirstein click here for types of prints available, mats, and frames.

 

 

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To find out more about this print by Jan Kirstein click here for types of prints available, mats, and frames.

 

 

IMG_3906To find out more about this print “The Shaman’s Journey” by Jan Kirstein click here for types of prints available, mats, and frames.

 

 

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To find out more about this print “Justice” by Jan Kirstein click here for types of prints available, mats, and frames.

 

 

 

 

 

And while you are looking at these  prints, you can tour all of Fine Art America’s website for many other artist’s works available, as well as additional works by Jan Kirstein. Just click here for more available on Fine Art America.

 

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Click here

for more information about this print.

 

How to Hang Your Wall Images


Thinking you might like to spice up your walls with a dash of creative spirit in the form of uplifting art, but finding all the choices for frames, mats, and hanging so baffling? Here are some helpful tips for hanging fine art in your home. Check out these suggestions, and maybe this will help clear the confusion!

 

Just click this photo to see this helpful Houzz article on tips for hanging art.

 

 

 

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To see how to select framing options, choose mats or to purchase click here.

 

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To see how to select framing options,choose mats or to purchase click here.

 

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To see how to select framing options,choose mats or to purchase click here.

 

 

To see more images like these,  click here to look around Fine Art America to see more of my works, by Jan Kirstein, or look over the whole website to see many other artists’ works as well! Enjoy your visit.

How to Pick the Right Work of Art for Your Space


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 How many times have you found 
a special spot in your home where 
you would love to hang a work of art,
 but had no idea how to begin choosing 
a painting for that particular spot? 

Or even if you had a piece of art in mind, 
how do you imagine that particular painting 
in that spot and decide if it would work well 
with your entire room?

At Pixels.com, the art website for purchasing fine art that is teamed with Fineartamerica’s website, they have a most helpful app for the iPad called Pixels. This remarkable app enables you to select your work of art, pull it up into a matt and frame in the window of your iPad, and take a photo of the painting juxtaposed with your actual room. How cool is that?

You can adjust the size of the art to fit your space, and you can see exactly what that particular piece looks like hanging on your wall. You should try it out. Just get the app called Pixels. It’s pictured here, and it’s free.

Upload the app and try it out on any art you see on the Pixels app. Of course you could put in my name, or any other name in the search bar and select an art piece for experimentation. Select the piece you want to play with, then select a size and art medium that you would prefer, like “framed print” or “stretched canvas.”

Then click the little camera lens icon and up comes the art piece with the frame and matt you picked. Behind the piece is a completely clear window through which you can see, you guessed it, your room. You can play with frames and Matt colors. Then hold your iPad up in front of the space where you would like to try the art and photograph the piece in your space!

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So fun! Try different art, different sizes, different frames and matts in your space,until you hit on just the right combination. In the two photos above, I went to Apps on my And how will you know it is right?

Well, first of all, consider proportion and balance. You want a piece that is neither too overwhelming in size for the space nor too small. You don’t want a size that looks lost on the wall.

The Next, you need to consider form and color. Choose a piece that highlights colors and shapes that appear in the room. For instance, I took a photo of one of my dogwood prints and put it over my sofa in my sitting room. I tried some variation in matts and frames. Notice how the gold and white floral pattern in the sofa are repeated in the organic shapes of the dogwood petals.

A word about picking your matt color. Try to pick a color that is neutral, if possible, and not one that overwhelms the colors in the art. Try to pick one of the predominant colors in the art, if you can.

For the frame, try again to choose a color that goes with the colors in your room as well as with the art. I know it’s a lot to think about, but this app will help you out with the use of all of its options. You will know when you hit on the right combination, I promise!
And a final word of advice: Only buy art that you LOVE!

Now here’s my question to you: which matt and frame choice do you like best, #1 or#2? Why? Let me know in your comments!