Kenryo Hara: Performance by Calligraphy


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This performance piece by Japanese artist Kenryo Hara combines an ocean of kodai moji calligraphy with the acting out of a dramatic narrative. These photos show the unfolding drama that erupts  from the thrashing marks of an exuberant  calligraphy brush. Loaded with ink  and an emerging storyline, the brush of Kenryo becomes the instrument of magestic manifestation for the telling of an expressive and dramatic unfolding.

Jan Kirstein

Click to enlarge

 

 

Butoh Dance Music Music: 吉本大輔 Dai Sekiguchi engraved ink bok-Koku: Hara Hyun 翏 Kenryo Hara

On the stage, the chief priest of hongaku-Ji Temple, the chief priest of hongaku-Ji Temple, was given support for many people. Thanks from the heart,!☆☆☆
Mr. Kaoru Cecilia Saito ☆ Chako Sawada Hitomi Fukao ☆’s ☆ Mr. Rokka Ando ☆ Sakura Nakagawa Hiro Sugiyama ☆’s ☆ Midori Katoh ☆ Mr. Mr. Hiromi Yamazaki ☆ Tai Kaori-San ☆ Mr. Rie Miyagawa ☆ Masanao Showjiki Sugiyama’s ☆ Day Junko Kasahara ☆… amazing photos on them all!  Thank you so much!!!

 

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Encouraging the young

 

 

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KENRYO HARA : Biography

Born on August 15th 1955 in Mie- Prefecture located in Honshu a region in central Japan.
In September of 2000 Kenryo joined the Kikkou-kai.
The Kikkou-kai studies the art of Kodaimoji under Koho Kato master who is one of the most respected and revered calligraphy artist of this form of Kodaimoji.
Kodaimoji- (Kodai: meaning “ancient” and Moji: meaning “character”) is the most ancient form of calligraphy known in China.
Kikkou-kai has adapted this ancient tradition of Kodaimoji into a new form of art and performance.
Every January The Ueno Royal Museum in Ueno hosts the Kikkouten exhibit. From 2001 Kenryo has continuously shown his work with this annual event.

 


ANCIENT JAPANESE SCRIPT AND CALLIGRAPHY

Kodai moji 古代文字 literally translates to “ancient characters”. Under the apprenticeship of renowned ancient character calligrapher Koho Kato since 2000, Japanese script and calligrapher Ten-You puts an artistic spin on traditional characters, transforming them into art that expounds the beauty and meaning of nature and life. She held her first overseas exhibition in New Zealand and became independent in 2007 while founding the Kodai Moji Artist Group, Ten-You Gumi. Since then, she has expanded her work and events internationally at New York, San Francisco, Paris and Barcelona, which also include awareness efforts for the 2011 Tohoku earthquake.
The contemporary Japanese language uses 3 scripts: Kanji, Hiragana and Katakana. Hiragana and Katakana, collectively known as Kana, are syllabic scripts derived from through man’yogana 万葉仮名, or phonetic sounds of kanji 漢字. The latter is commonly used as transliterations for gairaigo 外来語, or loans words from other languages in a modern Japanese context. Kanji is a logographic script and the oldest of the three, originating from ancient Chinese characters. Kanji was first introduced to Japan in the 1st century. Prior to that, there was no written form of the Japanese language. Literacy only began to gain traction in the 5th century, where texts were comprised solely of Chinese characters.

Ancient Chinese characters or hanzi 漢字 are known to have been first recorded around 1000 to 1500 BC, inscribed on tortoise plastrons and ox scapulae for divination uses through heating and interpreting the crack patterns. These oracle bones documented the communications between the heavens and the king of the Shang dynasty in China. The characters are a mix of hieroglyphic elements of nature and the cycle of life as well as abstract symbols. The approximated 85000 and 50000 characters recognized in Chinese and Japanese dictionaries respectively are derived from the incompletely identified set of 4000 hanzi. This information comes from the website: http://rgnn.org/2015/12/27/ancient-japanese-script-and-calligraphy-with-kodai-moji-artist-ten-you/

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Kenzie Okada


Here’s the story of how I discovered this artist. Two fellow artists on The Fine Art America website led me to this gem! Cliff Spohn started it all by making a comment below my newly posted artwork (pictured at the bottom of this feature,) referring me to the artist <strong>Kenzie Okada. Upon professing my ignorance of this artist, fellow artist VIVA Anderson provided me with the link to many of Kenzie’s works. The link is –http://www.wikiart.org/en/kendo-okada/decision-1956

Thanks to my fellow Fine Art America America  Cliff Spohn and VIVA Anderson.

 

After Kenzo Okada relocated from Tokyo to New York in 1950, his work came to represent a melding of Japanese traditions and American abstract trends. Rather than striving for pure abstraction, his work from the 1950s could be called “semi-abstract,” evoking the natural world through carefully composed form and a decidedly muted palette.

 

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These works are subtle, quiet, and poetic—more meditative in nature than the energetic gestural abstractions of some of his American-born counterparts.

 

 

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The composition of Decision (1956) is also organized to suggest nature.

 

Blocky, softly defined shapes organically arrange the canvas into rough horizontal registers, creating a panoramic quality reminiscent of landscape painting.

 

 

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Click on thumbnails to enlarge

 

 

Meanwhile, small, irregular shapes hover and tumble rhythmically across the stable ground. Okada thus seeks a balance between heavy and delicate, tangible and abstract.

 

And here is my painting that started the whole discussion

Janis Kirstein

 

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