Collector’s Choice: Joan Mitchell


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Joan Mitchell The Last Paintings

3 February – 28 April 2012, Hauser & Wirth London, Piccadilly

‘My paintings aren’t about art issues. They’re about a feeling that comes to me from the outside, from landscape. … Paintings aren’t about the person who makes them, either. My paintings have to do with feelings’.

– Joan Mitchell, 1974

 

 

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Hauser & Wirth is proud to present an exhibition of late paintings by American Abstract Expressionist, Joan Mitchell. Created during the last decade of her life, these large-scale canvasses mark a distinct departure from her more sombre works of the early 1960s. Her late paintings, dating from 1985 to 1992, are replete with vibrant colours, energy and excitement, combining Mitchell’s admiration of the work of Van Gogh and Monet, her interest in nature and her adept skill at expressing emotions and memories.

 

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Mitchell was born in Chicago and in 1950 moved to New York where she was one of the few female artists to participate in seminal exhibitions alongside prominent Abstract Expressionists such as Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollock and Franz Kline. In 1959, Mitchell relocated to France. She stayed in Paris for eight years before she moved to Vétheuil where she remained for the last 25 years of her life, producing dynamic paintings despite such momentous events as the loss of close family, friends and her long battle with cancer that took her life in 1992.

 

 

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MITCHiv Wall 1 014

 

Like many of the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists, Mitchell was fascinated by the French countryside and the lush landscape of Vétheuil featured prominently in her late paintings. In the diptych ‘River’, a painting of the River Seine as seen from her home, Mitchell filled two canvasses with vigorous brushstrokes in an array of greens, blues, purples, reds and a swath of yellow paint crossing the bottom of the canvas to represent the river. In ‘Sunflowers’, Mitchell again used a diptych format to depict one of her most well known subjects in the twilight of its life. In a conversation with Yves Michaud, Mitchell once said, ‘Sunflowers are something I feel very intensely. They look so wonderful when young and they are so moving when they are dying…’. With ‘Sunflowers’, Mitchell worked quickly across her canvasses, expressing her intense feeling through the intense gestures that form the unrestrained and multi-coloured flowers’ blooms. Pushing the boundaries of abstract painting, both ‘River’ and ‘Sunflowers’ illustrate Mitchell’s emotional and physical recollections of the countryside she loved.

 

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The exhibition also features Mitchell’s late, purely abstract paintings. These works range in format including single canvases, diptychs and tondos. The works display a radical and free use of colour and line, as well as a confident experimentation with composition, scale and physical structure. Each painting showcases Mitchell’s mature artistic style that, over a prolific period of three decades, had fully developed into a unique personal language of colour, line and form. Together, these late paintings demonstrate what Richard Marshall describes in the exhibition’s accompanying catalogue as the artist’s ‘pure joy of putting paint to canvas’.

 

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‘Joan Mitchell. The Last Paintings’ was organised in collaboration with Cheim & Read, New York and the Joan Mitchell Foundation.

 

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MITCHiv Wall 1 002

 

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Click here to see a great video about Joan Mitchell’s Last Years and Her Painting

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MITCHiv Wall 1 007

 

 

 

 

Thanks so much for coming to my blog today. Please share your thoughts and feelings here on this page. And subscribe to Kirsteinfineart  by going to the subscribe button on the right side of this page.

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Catherine Redmayne


Above image:  “Little Red Riding Hat,” by Catherine Redmayne. ‘Found subject’ on random monotype .  Below: “Spotted Boots,”  by Catherine Redmayne. Sharpie drawing and gesso over collage.

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http://catherine-redmayne.pixels.com/

 

 

 

Catherine Redmayne

London, England
“Colour really excites me and colour next to colour is endlessly amazing. When the weather is cold, I feel warmest working with colours.

 
People often say of painting as a pastime that it must be so relaxing. Well, not really, as it can be very frustrating and make whole days vanish when you meant to do something else. But it is gripping and exhilarating on good days – we will not mention the failures!

 
I won a painting competition at school when I was about 9 and I have just one picture I painted at that time (squirreled away by my mother and found in her treasures) which I could not achieve now – paintings done by children have such a freshness.

 
Since those distant days, I have played with all sorts of different techniques, been to many workshops, exhibited many pictures, sold quite a few, bought hundreds of books, run workshops for fun and for cash, visited dozens of exhibitions – and generally been interested in art.”   Statement by Catherine Redmayne

 

Green-Bridge-Redmayne“Green Bridge,” by Catherine Redmayne.  Collage, sanding, gold leaf.

 

Floodlights-Redmayne“Flood Lights,” by Catherine Redmayne. Paint and collage.

 

Cheerful-garden-Redmayne“Cheerful Garden,” by Catherine Redmayne. Drawing over ‘patchwork’ collage.

 

 

 

Catherine’s love of making art stems from her childhood, when she found her true gift of expression through the visual world. Upon looking back at a work of art she created at age 9, she recognized the joy and power of the creative child, and looks to this spirit to empower her works to this day.

 

 

 “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up,” said the master artist Pablo Picasso. I would say that Catherine has definitely maintained and nourished her creative inner-child artist, by looking at her current creations. The joy, simplicity and child-like wonder of a story-tale world surrounds us as we look at each of the images shown here.

 

 

 Spontaneity and exuberance dance across the surface of each image, from “Cheerful Garden,” to “Little Red Riding Hat.”  Most definitely not contrived, these original pieces bring to the foreground all sorts of childhood memories that were once lost to a layer of rushing adulthood demands.

 

 

 Look at these pieces and you may remember your own joyful childhood moments, and feast on the joy of all lost childhood, found once again.

 

 

Written by Janis Kirstein

 

 

 

Little-landscape-Redmayne“Little Landscape,” by Catherine Redmayne. Paint and collage.

 

Paradise-gardens-Redmayne“Paradise Gardens,” by Catherine Redmayne.  Monotype layers.

 

 

Kaboom tote

Website for 18″ x 18″ Kaboom Tote purchase:

http://fineartamerica.com/products/last-day-of-school-janis-kirstein-tote-bag.html

 

 

 

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Marta Baricsa: Collector’s Choice


www.martabaricsa.com

 

 

 “Your non-narrative paintings evoke contemporary Japanese calligraphy”
Nato Thompson, Curator MASS MoCA

 

 

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 OM Paintings

by Marta Baricsa
The Om paintings are focus meditation paintings.
All the Om paintings I made, I made by hand, without tracing or using any device such as a projector etc. Plus there are no corrections or overpainting.

 

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Om natural green with artist Marta Baricsa. 2011. Acrylic on canvas. 11.5 x 6.5 feet

I do my best to meditate and like a variety of meditations, sometimes Om meditations where I focus on the Om mantra.

I also feel my Om paintings are a type of meditation too. I focus in on the moment and repeat the Om circle as a mantra. So it’s a type of movement mediation. It’s a type of focus and releasing.

Have a look at this time lapse I did with my latest Om white stone painting.

http://youtu.be/tWTMUsD_fJ8

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Marta Baricsa exhibition

 

“Your minimal use of bold color is particularly striking in conjunction with your neutral palette.”

Lisa Dorin, Assistant Curator. Williams College Museum of Art. MA

 

About Marta Baricsa

      “I was born in London, England and I moved to Canada at an early age. While living in Toronto I attended a special 4 year arts program at Central Technical School. Realizing that painting was my main interest I later attended and graduated from the Experimental Arts Department at the Ontario College of Art. OCAD. I moved from Toronto fifteen years ago to Vancouver, British Columbia Canada. I live and work in my studio in the east side with my partner Roy Mackey who is a steel sculptor.
    Over the years I had the privilege of studying with Graham Coughtry, Daniel Solomon, Gustav Weisman, Ed Bartram and John Meredith.
    I have shown my work in galleries in Toronto, Vancouver, Victoria, San Francisco, New York and Los Angeles. My paintings can be seen at the Vancouver Art Gallery’s art rental and sales and during studio visits.
    My paintings are in private and corporate collections in Canada, U.S.A and Great Britain and are featured in over thirty movies and TV productions.”

 

See some of these works below:

 

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COLLAGES

 

In continuing with our exploration of collage, below you will see examples of collage and ink by Marta.

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