Painting Emotions and Verdier


 

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Heroic gestures expand on and out of the image surfaces by French artist Fabienne Verdier in a grand grace defying all limits.  The act of painting becomes a meditation where the painting instrument’s scope and scale demands a new perspective and awareness of the brush stroke. When a gesture commands three times the size of the human figure, a new correlation and comparison emerges between the painted marking and the human body.  The scale of the brush strokes call to mind land masses as seen from an aerial perspective amidst a tranquil ocean.

Jan Kirstein

 

 

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Emotion

 

http://fabienneverdier.com

 

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Portrait de Fabienne Verdier Portrait de Fabienne Verdier, 2007. Photograph of Dolorès Marat

1962
• Born in Paris.

1983
• Graduated from Ecole des Beaux-arts de Toulouse.
1984
• Awarded a post-graduate scholarship at the Sichuan Fine Arts Institute, China.
1984-1993
• Studied painting, aesthetics and philosophy at the Sichuan Fine Arts Institute with some of the last great traditional masters.
2003
• Publication of Passagère du silence (Passenger of Silence), (Albin Michel, Paris) — a memoir of her years of apprenticeship with Master Huang Yuan.2016 Patrick Derom Gallery, Brussels, Belgium.

2016 Waddington Custot Gallery, London, United Kingdom.
2015 Galerie Alice Pauli, Lausanne, Switzerland.
2014 City Hall, Hong Kong, China. Curated by Daniel Abadie.
2013 Galerie Jaeger Bucher, Paris, France.
2013 Patrick Derom Gallery, Bruges, Belgium.
2013 Erasmus Museum, Brussels, Belgium. Curated by Daniel Abadie.
2013 Memling Museum, Bruges, Belgium. Curated by Daniel Abadie.
2013 Groeninge Museum, Bruges, Belgium. Curated by Daniel Abadie.

 

 

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Angelina Jordan Astar


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Most incredible singing ever…


Angelina Jordan Astar, born 10 January 2006, also known as Angelina Jordan, is a Norwegian child singer who won the 2014 season of Norway´s Got Talent, singing classic jazz pieces, including “Gloomy Sunday” and “Fly Me to the Moon”.

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Angelina lives in Oslo with her family which includes a younger sister. She has previously lived in other countries, including the USA, where her father has worked as an engineer in the oil industry.
She is a pupil at Oslo Waldorf School and also attends the after-school program Oslo School of Music and Performing Art where she receives vocal training. In addition to singing she plays the piano, violin and flute.

 

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Collector’s Choice: Marc Chagall


 

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Marc Chagall (French, born Russia – present-day Belarus; 1887-1985): Carmen, 1966. Lithograph. Image size: 39-1/2 x 25-11/16 inches (100.5 x 65.3 cm). Created in 1966 from a maquette for Chagall’s “Triumph of Music,” a series of 3 large-scale decorations created for the Metropolitan Opera House in New York (Carmen, The Magic Flute, Romeo and Juliet). © Marc Chagall.

‘Chagall created this piece for the opera “Carmen” by George Bizet upon its opening at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. The print is a small detail from a preliminary painting of Chagall’s much larger “The Triumph of Music”, which now hangs at the Metropolitan Opera.’

“Chagall: Midsummer Night’s Dreams”
Through January 8, 2017
Carrières de Lumières, Les Baux de Provence, France
http://bit.ly/2heyQmy

Exhibition:
“Winter Exhibition 2016”
Until February 15, 2017
Gilden’s Art Gallery, London

Thanks to:  #IRequireArt @irequireart #art

 

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Born Moishe Shagal
6 July 1887 (N.S.)
Liozna, near Vitebsk, Russian Empire (present-day Belarus)
Died 28 March 1985 (aged 97)
Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France
Nationality Russian, later French
Known for Painting stained glass
Movement :  Cubism Expressionism

 
Marc Zakharovich Chagall (/ʃəˈɡɑːl/ shə-gahl,  6 July [O.S. 24 June] 1887 – 28 March 1985) was a Russian-French artist. An early modernist, he was associated with several major artistic styles and created works in virtually every artistic format, including painting, book illustrations, stained glass, stage sets, ceramic, tapestries and fine art prints.

Art critic Robert Hughes referred to Chagall as “the quintessential Jewish artist of the twentieth century” (though Chagall saw his work as “not the dream of one people but of all humanity”). According to art historian Michael J. Lewis, Chagall was considered to be “the last survivor of the first generation of European modernists”. For decades, he “had also been respected as the world’s preeminent Jewish artist”. Using the medium of stained glass, he produced windows for the cathedrals of Reims and Metz, windows for the UN, and the Jerusalem Windows in Israel. He also did large-scale paintings, including part of the ceiling of the Paris Opéra.

Before World War I, he traveled between St. Petersburg, Paris, and Berlin. During this period he created his own mixture and style of modern art based on his idea of Eastern European Jewish folk culture. He spent the wartime years in Soviet Belarus, becoming one of the country’s most distinguished artists and a member of the modernist avant-garde, founding the Vitebsk Arts College before leaving again for Paris in 1922.

He had two basic reputations, writes Lewis: as a pioneer of modernism and as a major Jewish artist. He experienced modernism’s “golden age” in Paris, where “he synthesized the art forms of Cubism, Symbolism, and Fauvism, and the influence of Fauvism gave rise to Surrealism.”  Yet throughout these phases of his style “he remained most emphatically a Jewish artist, whose work was one long dreamy reverie of life in his native village of Vitebsk.”

“When Matisse dies,” Pablo Picasso remarked in the 1950s, “Chagall will be the only painter left who understands what colour really is.”

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Marc Chagall

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Kandinsky


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Vasily Kandinsky

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In 1933, the Nazis closed the Bauhaus in Dessau, Germany (where it had been relocated from Weimar), and Vasily Kandinsky settled in Neuilly-sur-Seine, near Paris, where he lived until his death in 1944. During these years, he returned to the themes and iconography of Theosophy, an esoteric philosophy that sought to understand the connections between the universe, the divine, and the individual that had interested the artist before World War I. The central motif of the tentacled, amoeba-like form in Fragments recurs in Kandinsky’s late work, and has been interpreted as a Theosophical cypher for greed or a stand-in for the complex emotions felt throughout Europe in the wake of World War II.

Fragments is divided into independent floating elements, which include a miniature picture within a picture. This compositional device first appeared in Kandinsky’s work in 1929, and he used it to enforce spatial relationships and to render the illusion of three-dimensionality. In Fragments, four separate amalgamations of colors, forms, and odd shapes are suspended in a field of mosaic-like elements, the smaller pictures more vividly colored than their muted ground. The artist wished the viewer to feel compelled, by virtue of layered planes and seemingly recessive space, to mentally enter his paintings.

 

 

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Vasily Kandinsky

1866, MOSCOW; D. 1944, NEUILLY-SUR-SEINE, FRANCE

 

Vasily Kandinsky was born on December 4, 1866, in Moscow. From 1886 through 1892 he studied law and economics at the University of Moscow, where he lectured after graduation. In 1896 he declined a teaching position in order to study art in Munich with Anton Azbe from 1897 to 1899 and at the Kunstakademie with Franz von Stuck in 1900.

 

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Kandinsky taught in 1901–03 at the art school of the Phalanx, a group he cofounded in Munich. One of his students, Gabriele Münter, would be his companion until 1914.

 

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In 1902 Kandinsky exhibited for the first time with the Berlin Secession and produced his first woodcuts. In 1903 and 1904 he began his travels in Italy, the Netherlands, and North Africa and his visits to Russia. He showed at the Salon d’Automne in Paris from 1904.

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In 1909 Kandinsky was elected president of the newly founded Neue Künstlervereinigung München (NKVM). The group’s first show took place at Heinrich Thannhauser’s Moderne Galerie in Munich in 1909. In 1911 Kandinsky and Franz Marc began to make plans for Der Blaue Reiter Almanac, although the publication would not appear until the following year.

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Kandinsky’s On the Spiritual in Art was published in December 1911. He and Marc withdrew from the NKVM in that month, and shortly thereafter the Blaue Reiter group’s first exhibition was held at the Moderne Galerie. In 1912 the second Blaue Reiter show was held at the Galerie Hans Goltz, Munich. Kandinsky’s first solo show was held at Der Sturm gallery in Berlin in 1912. In 1913 one of his works was included in the Armory Show in New York and the Erste deutsche Herbstsalon at the Der Sturm gallery in Berlin. Kandinsky lived in Russia from 1914 to 1921, principally in Moscow, where he held a position at the People’s Commissariat of Education.

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Kandinsky began teaching at the Bauhaus in Weimar in 1922. In 1923 he was given his first solo show in New York by the Société Anonyme, of which he became vice-president. Lyonel Feininger, Alexej Jawlensky, Kandinsky, and Paul Klee made up the Blaue Vier (Blue Four) group, formed in 1924. He moved with the Bauhaus to Dessau in 1925 and became a German citizen in 1928. The Nazi government closed the Bauhaus in 1933 and later that year Kandinsky settled in Neuilly-sur-Seine, near Paris; he acquired French citizenship in 1939. Fifty-seven of his works were confiscated by the Nazis in the 1937 purge of “degenerate art.” Kandinsky died on December 13, 1944, in Neuilly.

Thanks to www.guggenheim.org website for the story and images.

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Cody Hooper


Above: “Inner Passions.”

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“A Breath of Heaven.”

 

 

www.codyhooperart.com

About Cody Hooper

Cody Hooper grew up in North Texas and now lives and works in Santa Fe &  Albuquerque, New Mexico. His passion for art began at a young age. As a child he was surrounded by art and music, along with the beauty of the Southwest landscape, inspiring his interest in fine art.

Hooper was given the opportunity to study under Southwest watercolor artist Barbara Hughes for several years. This set his foundation as an artist and throughout his early years as he focused primarily on realistic watercolors.

After many years of painting in watercolors, Hooper moved forward, experimenting with abstracts in various mediums. This pushed him to expand his horizons and tap into new areas of painting he had not yet explored. There was an obvious freedom and personal expression with abstraction and it was then that he really began to flourish.  He was deeply interested in the effects of color, texture and the emotional response to strong composition and design. By removing the representational and creating something that told a story without an observational subject matter was very exciting.

Today, Hooper’s work is a bold mix of styles, ranging from sleek and contemporary to weathered and organic. He brings a subtle and sophisticated feel to his paintings through a unique balance of color, composition and texture. His work is exhibited in the most prestigious galleries and featured in private and public collections worldwide.

 

 

Mozart and Brahms Inspired…

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“This is a series of paintings that have been created using original papers with music found in history. From 1800’s Mozart music to early 1900’s Volume Libraries, the music found in these paintings hold a certain historical quality that I find very interesting. I have always enjoyed the dynamic combination of old and contemporary.” Cody Hopper

 

Brahms (2012) – 16×16″ 3-24×24’s  Completed with Mozart and   Brahms Piano Concerto  and Mozart Piano Concerto No.1 (2013) – 24×24 ”

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“Crashing Into You”

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