Miguel Velit and His Completed Sculpture


 

 

Here’s Miguel Velit, in triumph before the sculpture he completed  at the beginning of August at Josephine Sculpture Park in Frankfort, Kentucky where he was a guest artist.

 

 

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Miguel Velit is a Sculptor from Lima, Peru. His sculptures include a whimsical but powerful exploration of dynamic space. I have known him since our days together at Vermont Studio  in Johnson Vermont and his work has always been a testimonial to the relentless pursuit of art and its ability to influence and alter the world.

 

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This Summer, he was  in residence at the nearby Josephine Sculpture Park in Frankfort, Kentucky as a guest artist where he was working on a variety of large metal sculptures from scrap metal gathered from local metal scrap metal yards. He has completed his sculpture and I have included photos of the results.

 

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Miguel has built sculptures all over the world for a variety of parks, interior and exterior spaces. Countries where his work is on exhibit include China, Poland, the United States, Argentina, Mexico and of course, his beloved hometown Lima, Peru.

 

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Embracing a vigorous investigation of building materials and spatial explorations, Miguel builds sculptures that are arrestingly confident, playful and memorable.

 

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Kentucky was honored to host Miguel as he continues his lifelong  artistic quest.

 

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James Rosenquist Still Not Sure He Knows What Pop Art Means


 

Artist James Rosenquist, a key figure in the pop art movement, has died. He was 83.Rosenquist’s wife, Mimi Thompson, told The New York Times that he died Friday in New York City after a long illness.

Rosenquist started by painting signs and billboard advertisements in Times Square and other public places. He later incorporated images from popular culture, from celebrities to consumer goods, into his work.

 

 

One of his best-known pieces is “President Elect,” created in the early 1960s. It is a billboard-style painting depicting John F. Kennedy’s face alongside a yellow Chevrolet and a piece of cake.

“The face was from Kennedy’s campaign poster. I was very interested at that time in people who advertised themselves,” Rosenquist told the art appreciation organization The Art Story. “Why did they put up an advertisement of themselves? So that was his face. And his promise was half a Chevrolet and a piece of stale cake.”

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James Rosenquist circa 1965

Getty

Another popular piece was Rosenquist’s “F-111,” which superimposes a Vietnam War fighter-bomber on images of children and consumer goods.

Rosenquist resisted comparisons to his contemporaries Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein.

“I’m not like Andy Warhol. He did Coca-Cola bottles and Brillo pads. I used generic imagery — no brand names — to make a new kind of picture,” Rosenquist said in a 2007 interview with Smithsonian magazine. “People can remember their childhood, but events from four or five years ago are in a never-never land. That was the imagery I was concerned with — things that were a little bit familiar but not things you feel nostalgic about. Hot dogs and typewriters — generic things people sort of recognize.”

Rosenquist was born in Grand Forks, North Dakota. His mother was an amateur painter who supported his creative interests early on. His watercolor of a sunset won him an art scholarship to take classes at the Minneapolis School of Art. He later attended the University of Minnesota before moving to New York City in 1955.

In 2009, a fire destroyed several works by Rosenquist at his home and studio in Aripeka, Florida. It was the same year he released his autobiography, “Painting Below Zero: Notes on a Life in Art,” written with David Dalton.

Rosenquist’s work has been featured in solo exhibitions at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art and other institutions.

AP Press

Collector’s Choice: Joan Snyder


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“The functions of Ms. Snyder’s art, first and foremost, are to further the tradition of painting and to explore the most serious aspects of the human condition; to connect us not only to one another and to nature but to ancient rites and myths. She reminds us that no matter how modern and civilized we are, art can still be raw, primitive and talismanic. Without apologies or decorum, Ms. Snyder’s work awakens all of the things still wild within us.” – Lance Esplund, WS

 

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Joan Snyder, (born April 16, 1940), is an American painter from New York. She is a MacArthur Fellow, a Guggenheim Fellow, and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellow.
Snyder first gained public attention in the early 1970s with her gestural and elegant “stroke paintings,” which used the grid to deconstruct and retell the story of abstract painting. By the late seventies, Snyder had abandoned the formality of the grid. She began more explicitly incorporating symbols and text, as the paintings took on a more complex materiality. These early works were included in the 1973 and 1981 Whitney Biennials and the 1975 Corcoran Biennial.

 

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Joan Snyder was born on April 16, 1940 in Highland Park, New Jersey. She received her AB from Douglass College in 1962 and her MFA from Rutgers University-New Brunswick in 1966.

In 1969 Snyder married photographer Larry Fink. She gave birth to their daughter, Molly, in 1979. Her grandson Elijah was born in 2012. In 2011 Snyder married her partner of 28 year, Margaret Cammer, a retired New York State Acting Supreme Court Judge and the former NY Deputy Administrative Judge of The New York City Civil Court.

Snyder currently lives and works in Brooklyn and Woodstock, NY. She is represented by Franklin Parrasch Gallery in New York, NY, Parrasch Heijnen Gallery in Los Angeles, CA, and Elena Zang Gallery in Woodstock, NY.

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For inspiration of the creative spirit:  KIRSTEINFINEART.COM

Collector’s Choice: Josette Urso


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Josette Urso

About painting

Teetering between urban and natural subjects I make exploratory paintings and drawings working directly and urgently in response to my immediate environment. My approach involves “moment-to-moment” extrapolation governed by intuitive leaps of scale, color and wayward geometry. Contrasts and cross-fertilizations unfold and are cumulative, non-linear, free flowing and interpretive. Space becomes an ambiguous and malleable substance and I delight in its manipulation as I meander acrobatically in a kind of gymnasium of convoluted mark making and image collision. All along the way, I engage the known as well as the unknown in unforeseen ways.

 

For me, drawing and painting parallel the act of seeing and are the most direct links to private time with the physical world. Despite the urgency of my process, as I work, time still slows down. My work becomes a record of this exploration and a reflection of my inherent energy and reason for living.

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