Transformation


Fine art and fashion go hand in hand. Click here to see today’s latest fashion creation by Jan Kirstein. 

 

 

“Wild and Wicked 2” by Jan Kirstein. Click images to see enlargements.

 

Writing advice from Coco Chanel

by Elaine Bennett

 

Coco Chanel
Gabrielle Bonheur “Coco” Chanel in 1928, Public Domain,

No doubt you’ve heard of Coco Chanel, the French fashion designer who liberated women from stiff, formal clothing and popularized the still-ubiquitous “Little Black Dress.” Her fashion advice remains legendary—just Google “remove one accessory” and your screen will fill with blogs and articles quoting or misquoting her famous dictum

“Before you leave the house, look in the mirror and take one thing off.”

But while Chanel intended that as fashion advice, I think it works just as well for writers.

How many adverbs have you used? Surely you don’t need them all. And those adjectives—wouldn’t a few descriptive phrases enliven your work more?

Of course, before you can revise—your outfit or your writing—you have to create it first. Write until you’ve finished the draft. But before it “leaves the house,” give it a good once-over. Is every word, every sentence, necessary? If it isn’t—copy, cut, and paste. Slap it into the writer’s equivalent of a jewelry box, the Outtakes file.

More advice from Coco Chanel

“Take one thing off” may be Chanel’s most-quoted piece of advice. But I found another one I like quite a lot in this slideshow from Australian Vogue:

“In order to be irreplaceable one must be different.”

While we’re on the subject of revising, I’d lop off “In order” at the top of that sentence. But let’s not blame Chanel; perhaps it got added in translation.

“To be irreplaceable, one must be different.” I tell my writers a variation of this all the time. And my clients, too. They talk about subjects that thousands—millions—of people have already talked about: diversity, ethics, management. How can they differentiate themselves from the crowd? By weaving their own stories into the mix. No one else has had yourexperiences, has your perspective.

Make your communications irreplaceable—and your ideas memorable—by being your own, unique self. (Little Black Dress optional.)


Writing is just the first part of the process. Revising—that’s the secret sauce that gives your writing zing. Join my free webinar on revising.

 

 

 

 

Fabulo – Us


 

35053811_2023691317702702_4454688277810642944_nPhoto by Nica Guerrero

 

This week’s New Moon brings an abundance of creative energy and abundant pathways in new possibilities. I hope all of you are enjoying this surge of energy. While it may feel  disquieting in some ways to some of you, new doors will be opening to those who move ahead with the uplifting energy.

 

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I am continuing to paint as well as create in my basement studio.  If you check out the painting on my home page at the very top, you will see a collage constructed from Japanese paper and sumi-e ink. I love the haiki brush and ink, and I love the Japanese papers I find at my local art store, Preston’s Art Supplies, that is like the Moses (Father) of art supply stores here in Louisville.  Their selection of Japanese paper has me salivating with creative fervor, big time!

Though my goal is to have a studio for creating my art work, I am currently grateful for my basement,  waterlogged  but still a concrete real space for painting. My hope is to generate a studio space through my creative process. I do not think this is an unreasonable dream as I have been a professional painter for over 40 years.

So my idea is to finance this dream with my creative process. You can see my shopify website here, so see all the fabulous fashions that are flowing like an electric waterfall of exciting creative abundance.

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Sometimes prolonged hardship can generate this kind of creative abundance and so now after one of the hardest years I have ever survived in 35 years of teaching , I am so grateful for my Summer break, this opportunity to explore and expand my creative ocean.

New Moon

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This year has been hard for Kentucky teachers, as you may have heard, due to the issues emerging from challenges generated through the legislature and the governor of Kentucky, as the passage of a Sewage Bill , which began a malevolent hacking away of our pension plan, a breaking of a contractual agreement, a legal contract. But  faith, reason and courage combined with the power of our unity gives Kentucky Teachers renewed hope each day in the unfolding of our current challenges. The challenges continue, and the teachers will not give up.

 

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Meanwhile, Summer brings an At-Last! kind of renewal and period of hope and renewal through creative abundance and faith.

 

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Though the process of constructing my paintings into fashion, I feel the elation of purpose in creating for everyone in this endeavor.  The fashion line I am creating: “Evening Splendor,” combines the feel of casual comfort with the look of dressy occasion.  And making these clothes is just so much fun!

 

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Now I am going to ask for your opinion. Vote on your favorite Evening Splendor outfit. Just put your answer in the response box below, or if you don’t want to fool with joining WordPress, please send your vote directly to my email here. 

I would love to hear your thoughts!

Here are your choices:

Click on thumbnails to enlarge:

 

 

        #1                  #2                  #3                 #4                  #5

 

 

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Rick Bennett


 

 

https://picasaweb.google.com/104174471582030506035/RickBennettPaintings2013#

“I think I do better painting when I’m calm, and meditation is definitely helpful for that. For me painting can be a kind of meditation in itself: not always, but the best painting sessions for me are when I’m totally focused on the process, and get into a completely intuitive state of mind. I don’t actually “think” about colors or brush marks or shapes, I just do it—or it just happens. Of course a lot of times painting can be frustrating and disappointing but for me the best times are the most meditative.”

Rick Bennett

 

 

 

 

Rick Bennett: About the Artist

 

Rick Bennett is a nationally known artist whose works reside in over one-hundred public, academic, corporate, and private collections as far west as Los Angeles and as far east as New York City. The artist’s paintings have received many national and regional awards including the Wiesberg award for realist painting and the Norman Kolhepp award for painting. Bennett has recently been chosen for the upcoming publication Indiana Artists of the 21st Century

 

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Selected Collections

 

Sidley, Austin, Brown, and Wood New York, NY.
College of Mt. St. Vincent, New York, NY.
Hoyt Institute of Fine Art, New Castle, PA.
Brown Forman Corporation, Louisville, KY.

 

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Dolgen Corporation, Atlanta, GA.
Louisville Presbyterian Seminary, Louisville, KY.
In Flux, Taunton, MA.
BellSouth Corporation, Louisville, KY.
Nanjing Academy of Fine Arts, Nanjing, China.

 

 

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Kosair Children’s Hospital, Louisville, KY.
Mallor Bordner and Miller, Bloomington, IN.
Ventas Corporation, Chicago, IL.
Aesthetics in Jewelry, Louisville, KY.
Mayan Gypsy, Louisville, KY.

 

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Ogden, Newell, and Welch, Louisville, KY.
Van Hoose and Associates, Lexington, KY.
Centre College, Danville, KY
Hanover College, Hanover, IN.
F.B.N. Productions, Lexington, KY.

 

 

 

To me, the common thread that holds all of Rick Bennet’s work together is an incredible sense of presence with the entire universe that prevails in each image or object, whether ceramic piece, oceanscape or pattern exploration. The unique quality of “Being There” rises through the quiet emergence of shifting light in translucent ripples of the ocean bed, in the repetition of seemingly simple patterns, in the harmonious curve of a clay vessel.

All of his work radiates a centeredness most uncommon in our collective human consciousness. This contemplative awareness, often elusive in our day to day existence is revealed in his work. So many of us rarely glimpse these moments of centered awareness in our lives often spent pursuing the frantic business of living.

If you take the time to slow down, and allow the work to enter your consciousness, you will be taken beyond space and time to a place of immeasurable inner peace.

Written by Janis Kirstein

I would like to give special thanks to Ric Bennett for allowing me to feature his art work on KIRSTEINFINEART.

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Collector’s Choice: Jane Davies


janedaviesartgallery.com

 

Vertical Series

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Jane Davies’ work combines bold organic shape and line with layers of atmospheric transparency. The drawing seems to emerge from the layers of color as thoughts and their associated feelings rise from the subconscious mind. The images often seem to merge a stream of consciousness with a sense of recognition or realization through reflection.  Color appears sometimes bold, other times subtle as a whisper. The drawing crashes in bold arcs through the images, as well as taps gently in contrasting rhythms of gentle glissando.

Written by Janis Kirstein

 

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Coastal Fragments

This is one of a series of pieces exploring the grid structure in a very limited palette of blues, greens, neutrals, with red as an accent color. I was interested in building atmospheric layers and textures, and contrasting the formal grid structure with freely expressive mark making.  The results remind me of seascapes, weathered boat hulls, rocks, salt spray.

 

 

 

 

 

About Jane Davies

Rupert, VT – United States

 

Jane Davies is a full time artist working in paint, drawing media, collage, and occasionally encaustic. She offers workshops nationwide and online, helping people to find a personal and playful approach to art making.  “I am most complimented when someone tells me that my work inspired them to try something new in their own art”.

Beginning as a potter in the early 1990s, Davies transitioned into freelance art in the early 2000’s, creating artwork for manufactured home décor and gift products. Fine art had always been a sideline for Davies, but in 2009 she began giving it her full attention, giving up the freelance work in favor of painting and teaching workshops.

“I realized that I did not really know who I was as an artist.  My work had always been subject to the needs of outside demands – for sale, for a commercial product, or as instructional examples –  and I wanted to know what happened if I just made art as a personal inquiry. I still want to know, and it is that ongoing quest that keeps me motivated”.

Jane Davies is the author of three books on collage and mixed media, one on ceramics, and has one DVD on painting and collage techniques.

 

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Black and White

In this series I am exploring mark-making, and seeing what I can do with it in the absence of color. Color is such a strong language in itself, so I am finding it interesting to focus on other aspects of the work, such as quality of line, value, layering, and pattern.

 

 

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Grids

This series is an exploration of grid and cruciform formats, using the rectangle as the basic element

 

 

Education:

 

• 1988 – 1990: I studied Ceramics at the School for American Crafts at Rochester Institute of Technology, plus one year there as Artist in Residence, 1990 – 91. • BA in Philosophy at Bennington College, Bennington, Vermont, 1987.

 

Artist’s Statement

 

Formal elements are my foremost source of inspiration: color relationships, line, shapes, texture, pattern, and depth. It is after the fact that I connect my visual vocabulary to specific features of my experience.

I see in the Submerge series landscape, coastline, worn surfaces, rocks, tides – no doubt a reflection of my childhood spent in Nova Scotia.

The Washed Up series I’m trying to throw together disparate elements, as if they washed up on the beach in a random arrangement, and then see how I can relate them to one another formally.

In the Pattern Grids I see rhythm, counterpoint, perhaps a visual expression of a fascination with cycles and frequencies engendered by my background in music (think ukulele, starting at the age of five).

Like many artists, my process involves a balance between intuitive mark making, and careful deliberation. I try to stay present to this dialog with the painting, and discover possibilities, rather than force the painting to a preconceived conclusion. Each one is a surprise. I leave my paintings open to interpretation by the viewer.

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Big Fat Art

Big Fat Art is a state of mind rather than a specific kind of art; it is all about exploring mark-making, throwing unlikely elements together to see how they dance together on the page, and keeping a lot of them in process. Some of them become finished pieces.

 

 

 

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