Hildy Maze Makes Mind Moves


Light Space & Time Online Art Gallery is very pleased to announce that Hildy Maze has been selected as one of the four artists of the gallery’s recent eighth “Solo Art Series” Art Competition.

 

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Hildy will now have a month-long solo art exhibition and she will be featured on the gallery’s front page, in the Gallery’s YouTube Channel, as well as in the “Solo Art Series” archive. See links below to access.

 

Artist Biography:

Hildy Maze is an American artist with Turkish, Russian, Austrian heritage. Born in Brooklyn, NY she received a BFA from Pratt Institute. For years, Hildy lived and worked in her loft in Tribeca, NYC before moving to East Hampton, NY where she currently works and lives.

Hildy is best known for her abstract contemplative oil on paper drawing, painting collages. In her messy paradise, which is her studio, Hildy explores mind and identity. Though her process of collage and the handling of materials she intimately describes how our active mind creates collages of thoughts and patterns, as in a dream. If we examine our thoughts, we can see they are fragmented pieces, empty of solidity. “None of us can avoid thoughts” she says, “but through awareness of our pitfalls, beauty, strengths, and weaknesses we can open windows into the mind”. The core of her contemplative art practice is to visually embody the blind spots as a result of our thoughts.

She is interested in the study of how the mind works as a means of gaining insight into how we communicate, how we create identity through form, emotions, and consciousness, and how we hide in that creation. She explains that essentially this work is about all of us and the empty, clear and unconditional nature of the mind we all have. When we know the nature of our mind we will know the nature of our world.

Hildy’s work is influenced by her long-time study and practice of Tibetan Buddhist meditation with Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche. Her studio floor is covered with a vast tapestry of painted paper—ripped, aged, and often walked on for days or months. This, she says allows the process and rhythm of art-making to come more alive with spontaneity and unpredictability. Her work has a rugged, earthy, hands-on, living quality. The treatment of the paper lends to it an inherent living quality. Depending on the passing of time and light, it takes on various characteristics and a quality of accelerated impermanence as the paper ages and becomes fragile, not unlike those things we search for and cherish in an attic or basement, or even at an archeological site, or when retrieving a lost memory. An otherwise ordinary, insignificant quality becomes special. A fingerprint, wrinkle, rip, drip, or tear becomes texture and language. These abstract contemplative works were developed with the view that art has the capacity to infuse our experience with awareness of our inherent nature, and, along with their carefully chosen titles, invite viewers to move beyond the boundaries of the image into a more contemplative consideration of mind in relationship to the phenomena of what we consider objective reality.

An additional activity that informs Hildy’s work is her familiar, family-like relationship with a colony of Herring and Great Black-Backed Gulls she’s been feeding hard-boiled eggs to for 20 years at Maidstone Beach Bay. She says, “We know each other well, perching on my head and shoulders, surrounding me as if protecting the bounty they know I have for them. This ritual is filled with a sense of an intimacy with wildness. I’ve learned who is mated to who, each gull’s idiosyncrasies, who their chicks are, when they arrive at the bay in August, how they physically change from white to speckled depending on the mating cycle and season’s light and so much more”. Eventually, she would like to develop an installation called “lover of the open sky” based on this relationship with the gulls.

Hildy has exhibited her work throughout the U.S. including NYC, Long Island City, Brooklyn, California, and Beijing, China. She has won numerous awards and is in several private collections in the U.S, Europe and Asia.

Hildy lives in East Hampton, NY continuing with her study and practice of meditation, making art, and feeding the gulls whenever the weather allows.

 

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Artist Statement:

Years ago, a friend sent me the Prajnaparamita, known as the Heart Sutra based on realizing the non-conceptual simplicity of reality, “form is emptiness, emptiness is form”. Having a heightened interest about how mind works and how mind is, reading the Heart Sutra changed my life on the spot! Within a week I was practicing and studying Tibetan Buddhist meditation with Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, a Tibetan Buddhist meditation master and artist. I received ‘pointing out instructions’ from him which brings the investigation and recognition of mind’s flawless nature into personal experience cutting through conceptual obscurations that are our endless, dualistic thoughts and emotions.

My abstract contemplative work is completely informed by these realizations. My path of making visual images became the inner structure of mind and how its’ patterns of confusion obscure our recognition of this vast space of ceaseless energy. For ten years I studied and practiced meditation with Trungpa Rinpoche until his death in1987. Since that time my work has gone through a process of increased familiarity with how mind works and how to present that familiarity thru visual images.

The development of each piece is experiential using collaged drawing and painting on paper with disparate techniques and specific titles discussing how mind, when active, creates collages of emotional thought patterns, like in a dream. The images are intended to be intimate, yet not isolated since the activity of mind is the same for everyone yet personal because each of us is affected by our thoughts and emotions differently. The work is unrefined with an immediate, handmade, unprepared quality, working with the ordinary characteristics of the paper meaning rips, wrinkles, aging, fragile-ness and light sensitivity. A sense of impermanence representing our life progression.

My process is filled with discovery and surprise, playing an edge within myself with deliberateness and imperfection without conceptualization, trusting mind’s innate clarity. For me, oil on paper collage is the most responsive way to investigate the mind. Whether awake or dreaming, mind is like a collage, appearing as countless variations of thoughts and images, as an over-lapping unfinished aesthetic that embraces the unresolved, open-ended imperfections of living. Viewing mind and collage this way contributes to the hands-on realness of intimacy and immediacy of seemingly non-sequitur abstraction with a touch of representational expression.

 

I recall instructions from Trungpa Rinpoche, ‘art arises from a deep merging of mind and heart, seeing from within, drawing from pure awareness without visually grasping, beginning from uncertainty without reference point’. Drawing freely without visual judgment; spontaneous and personal, I use tools and techniques that are intimate and varied, anything that can make a mark with controlled spontaneity. I would like the images and titles to create an accessible, personal space, like hearing a familiar voice. The images can be viewed as individually framed pieces, or informally, closer to how they were made, simply pinned to the wall, or randomly together similar to how our thoughts arise, dwell and dissolve in a seemingly continuous, often unrelated stream. .

Essentially I view my work as an evolving inquiry. I continue to live, make art, and to study the principles of Buddhist contemplative philosophy, a pursuit not unlike cleaning the dust off the windows in a house in order to see the world and oneself more clearly and precisely, with less aggression and with more equanimity, kindness and humor. To view more of Hildy’s artworks visit her website;

 

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http://hildymaze.com

 

Check out this Fab video Presentation of Hildy’s work.

You Tube Presentation

 

Here are individual images of Hildy’s work.

https://www.lightspacetime.art/hildy-maze-solo-art-exhibition/

Many thanks to the Light Space Gallery for this story and images.    

Light and Space GalleryLight and Space Gallery

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Give Yourself Permission to Create


So often, permission to create is denied to us through a variety of societal restraints as well as self imposed restrictions of judgements and insecurities. To create is a right you are born to fulfill. And what better way to begin creating than in an unlined journal. Write your thoughts and add your sketches. You deserve the right to find your voice.

Jan Kirstein

20% discount https://kirsteinfineart.myshopify.com/discount/BFCM17

20% discount https://kirsteinfineart.myshopify.com/discount/BFCM17

20% discount https://kirsteinfineart.myshopify.com/discount/BFCM17

Official Opening Today


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I would lke like to invite you to the opening today of my new website: http://kirsteinfineart.myshopify.com.  You can visit through this link or through my main menu on my front page through the Shopping tab.

Here are just a few of my favorite things you can see: (Click on thumbnails to enlarge.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prayers for the People of Syria


Requiem for Syria

Tonight I pray that all of your families will find love, peace, joy and justice in their lives despite the many tragic losses suffered in the war torn country. Of Syria.  With great gratitude, I ask for the emanation of abundant blessings to enfold and comfort all of your families within this ever changing Life on Earth.

I give thanks for the lives of all who have passed into the arms and heart of Glory on High. May the angels of heaven wrap you in their wings of love and solace on these most holy nights of faithful vision and may the bounty of The Universe’s love and protection provide a flame of eternal hope throughout this time of sorrow and darkness for your blessed families.

Amen

Prayer by Janis Kirstein, U.S.A.

 

To enlarge these paintings please click on the thumbnails.

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Paintings to Honor the Sojourn of the Syrian Refugees April 7, 2017

I have created these paintings to honor those who have suffered loss of life, home or loved ones through the egregious misfortune of war in Syria.

The first two paintings present my hope and vision for all victims of this deadly war exhuming the Syrian countryside. The next four paintings reveal the fire and destruction endured by the exodus of people from Syria and celebrate the spirit of all who have survived and persevered throughout all of their many horrific challenges.

These paintings are mixed media on masonite blocks. Each painting is 8″ x 10.”

 


Three years ago, I tried to raise awareness of the atrocities of chemical warfare in Syria of the Assad regime on his own people. At that time I attempted to raise money through Hatchfund so I could create these works on a large scale.

I want to thank all who contributed and donated money to this cause that I started called “”Sojourn Empathies” to raise awareness of the refugees from war torn countries and their life experiences, specifically of the victims of Syrian women and children killed by chemical attacks in Syria by the Assad regime. Unfortunately I was not able to raise enough money for larger works and traveling exhibitions, but I was able to paint these small works as a testimony to the empathy of the American people.

At that this time three years ago, I received word of the use of chemical weapons used by the Assad regime on his own people including women and small children.  I also accessed the tangible evidence of many extremely graphic photographs of chemical war victims by the Assad government in Syria including women, and very small children, and the dozens of body bags that lined cold cement floors in basement bunkers as a result of this horrid brutality. These photos were all marked with the copyright notices of the United States Marines.

After seeing these photographs, I was inspired to raise the awareness of the American people of these atrocities occurring in Syria.

Though I was never able to raise the money for creating these larger art works, I still hold the suffering of the Syrians in my heart and mind, especially with the most recent occurrence of chemical weapons used in Syria by Assad.
Today I would like to share these images with you that express my empathy for the people of Syria at this time and the perilous journey of both the survivors as well as those who have passed to a realm of peace and glory.
Now after three years, I feel even more compelled to get these paintings out to the world to elicit compassion and empathy for these refugees.

My project was called “Sojourn Empathies.” It was my desire that people will come to realize the suffering of these people with everything they have been through and will understand that we must embrace their lives and experiences with compassion and empathy.

I am so eternally grateful for the donations I received from Abby Lane, Jan Arnow, Bob Abrams, Johanna Boz, Ada Assenjo, Jane Larsen Wigger, Lauren Hill and Myrl Kirstein. The funds I was trying to reach with a Hatchfund Challenge was  2,000.00 though I didn’t make my goal, I was so grateful to my supporters and so determined to support this cause that I created these small paintings anyway.

Writing and painting by Jan Kirstein

To see these paintings as framed prints, mounted metal prints, stretched canvas prints and other useful items on Fineartamerca, click here.

 

 

 

 

Happy Halloween! The Ultimate ART DAY!


 

 

Two art students at Western Hills High School produce their Halloween interpretation of “Monster.”

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Painting by Julia Martinez, Sophomore at Western Hills High School

 

 

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Painting by Stirling Crawford, Junior, Western Hills High School

 

 

 

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Stirling speaks with his hand….
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Costume Day at Western Hills, with Cheech of Cheech and Chong, and an angel.

Monster Project:  For High School Level Students

 

Create a Monster                             Kirstein

 

Objective: Design a symbolic portrait of a “monster,” using symbols to convey the monster’s inner and outer personality, affinities and tendencies. You can use collage, pencil, colored pencil, marker or paint, and you must cover your whole sheet of paper with an environment for the monster.

 

 

Your monster does not have to be realistic or look like a person, but  it must include:

  • A monster figure, whether drawn, painted, or created with glued collage magazine pieces.

2) Use entire sheet of paper.

3) Use proportion to create a sense of the unusual and to create emphasis and balance. Create variety and harmony through the use of color, shape and value.

4) Monster needs to convery personality and the environment needs to surround it with symbols pertaining to the likes and dislikes of this monster you have created.

 

How to proceed:

Step 1: Draw your monster on a piece of 12” x 18”  white paper to formulate and brainstorm your design. On this paper, decide how the main figure will look, and how you will arrange the objects in your drawing.

Step two: Draw main figure and symbols with pencil.

Step three: Use prisma colored pencils or regular colored pencils for the color. You may also use tempra paint, water color or magic marker. Magazine collage is also encouraged. You may also glue in words that relate to the monster.

 

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“Clown” painted by Blaze Paul, Freshman Western Hills High School

Scale I: Focus

Project completed

Student followed directions/classroom rules

Student made effort to meet objectives and goals

Work completed on time

Effort/attitude

 

Scale II: Craftsmanship/Technique

Craftsmanship is aptitude, skill, manual dexterity in use of media and tools.

Technique is manner and skill with which the artist employs the tools/materials to

achieve the chosen effect.

Criteria:

Skillful use of media

Care taken with project

Work area cleaned daily

Media used with correct technique

Technical skill in the use of media

Visual detail (neatness)

Appropriate use of supplies and materials

Skillful and appropriate use of materials

 

Assessment:

 

4  Assignment on time; meets or exceeds all criteria.

3  Assignment on time with one criterion missing.

2  Assignment on time but has two criteria missing.

  • Assignment late or has three or four criteria missing.
  • Assignment late or has inappropriate solution to the problem, incomplete

 

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“Lion Monster” by Hala Jordon, Junior, Western Hills High School