Give Yourself Permission to Create


So often, permission to create is denied to us through a variety of societal restraints as well as self imposed restrictions of judgements and insecurities. To create is a right you are born to fulfill. And what better way to begin creating than in an unlined journal. Write your thoughts and add your sketches. You deserve the right to find your voice.

Jan Kirstein

20% discount https://kirsteinfineart.myshopify.com/discount/BFCM17

20% discount https://kirsteinfineart.myshopify.com/discount/BFCM17

20% discount https://kirsteinfineart.myshopify.com/discount/BFCM17

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Miroslava Rakovic: Dreams and Perceptions


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“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel…..” said the revered writer Maya Angelou, who passed away yesterday at age 84, leaving us her legacy of great poetic writings of wisdom.

 

This quote by the late great writer Maya Angelou directly applies to the paintings of Serbian artist Miroslava Rakovic.

In her paintings, Miroslava is following feelings and dreams. In her collages, or other works where she uses different media on paper, canvas or in digital work, she reflects a strong symbolic character; an iconographic search that follows the changes in her personal life.

 

Click on thumbnails to enlarge.

 

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Biography

Miroslava Rakovic was born in Novi Sad, Serbia (former Yugoslavia).
She graduated at the Academy of Art Niv Sad . She works in the area of illustration, design and painting, and currently she is a professor of graphic design.
Her work has been display in a selection of various exhibitions in Serbia.

 

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Contact artist:

 

http://www.arteafk.com/miroslava-rakovic-art

Reading Cy Twombly: Poetry in Paint


Reading Cy Twombly

By Mary Jacobus

September 16, 2016
ARTS & CULTURE
These images, selected from my book Reading Cy Twombly: Poetry in Paint, indicate the range and provocation of Cy Twombly’s works on canvas and paper, pointing especially to his inventive use of literary quotation and allusion throughout his long career and his relation to poetry as an inspiration for his art.

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Twombly’s working copy of a paperback translation of Three Secret Poems, by the twentieth-century Greek poet George Seferis, shows his hands-on approach to quotation and revision as well as paint stains from his work in progress. A number of marked passages reappear in Twombly’s paintings of the mid-1990s, notably in Quattro Stagioni (1993–94) and Say Goodbye, Catullus, to the Shores of Asia Minor (finally completed in 1994).

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One of a sequence of related drawings, Venus and Adonis (1978) wittily alludes to Shakespeare’s poem of the same title. Along with a series of cleft heart-shaped (buttock-shaped?) and phallic forms poised in suggestive proximity, each drawing contains a flower-like scribble and a foldout book. Perhaps Twombly is alluding to the “flowers” of poetry as well as to Venus’s rival, the boar who gores Adonis with his amorous tusk.

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Il Parnasso (1964) riffs on Raphael’s Renaissance fresco in the papal Stanza della Segnatura. Twombly responds in his own fashion to the auratic cultural icons of Rome, drawing attention to the missing role of painting in the representation of learning and culture. The play of line replaces the playing of Apollo’s lyre at the apex of Raphael’s design. Signing himself in the shuttered rectangular window around which Raphael’s fresco arches, Twombly draws attention to the flat surface of the “wail” or support.

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The early series of works on paper Poems to the Sea (1959) shows Twombly’s use of horizon line, wave signs, and quasi-writing, along with thick creamy paint, to eroticize the abstract play of repetition. In a series that makes reference to Sappho, Twombly also seems to be alluding to the typographical experiment of Mallarmé’s shipwreck poem, Un Coup de Dés, as a sequence of rhythmic marks and blanks. Non-referential signs tussle with the impulse to “read” and “write,” as if words and thoughts were about to be born from the waters of the Mediterranean.

 

 

 

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Synopsis of a Battle (1968) takes Twombly’s blackboard paintings of the late 1960s in the direction of the era’s obsession with space travel, alluding to the blackboard calculations of NASA scientists as well as his own fascination with weightlessness. Abstruse mathematical formulas and recurrent fan shapes suggest orbiting gyrations, rather than battle formations. Cyanotype blueprints for gravity-defying Gemini and Apollo spacecraft were widely available at the time. Here, Twombly designs his own prototype.

 

 

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Twombly’s paired paintings, Bacchus Psilax and Bacchus Mainomenos (2004) show the winged Bacchus morphing into his identical twin, the raging mad god who unleashes a title of blood. Painted during the bloodiest years of the Iraq occupation, when the first and second Battles of Fallujah brought the heaviest urban fighting since the Vietnam War, the Bacchus series has been linked to the fury of Achilles’s twelve-day brutalization of Hector’s body, towed around the grave mount of Patroclus. Twombly’s work elsewhere refers to the destruction of Sumerian cultural heritage.

 

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CY TWOMBLY, HERO AND LEANDRO, PART II, 1981–84. OIL-BASED HOUSE PAINT, OIL PAINT (PAINT STICK) ON CANVAS, 61 3⁄8″ × 80 1⁄2″. © CY TWOMBLY FOUNDATION. PHOTO COURTESY KARSTEN GREVE, ST. MORITZ.

The middle painting from Twombly’s sequence, Hero and Leandro (1981–84), suggests his interest in the whiteout—an obliteration that is also a kind of memory. As the sea washes through the story of Leandro’s drowning, the liquidity of water and paint eradicate the visible. Drawing on another Mediterranean narrative, Twombly combines his lifelong fascination with the sea with the erasure of a forgotten name, hidden in the darkness at lower right—not Leandro’s, but Hero’s.

 

 

 

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CY TWOMBLY, UNTITLED (TO SAPPHO), 1976, OIL, WAX CRAYON ON DRAWING CARDBOARD, 59″ × 53 1⁄4″. © CY TWOMBLY FOUNDATION. COURTESY ARCHIVES FONDAZIONE NICOLA DEL ROSCIO.

Twombly’s “homage” to Sappho in Untitled (To Sappho) (1976) creates an erotic visual poem out of Sappho’s fragmentary epithalamium, using purple (the mark of consummation and death) both to celebrate and to mourn Hyacinthus’s death and transformation into a flower. The juxtaposition of paint and poetry marks the conjunction of the pastoral strain and the pastoral “stain”—painting and sexuality. Twombly’s relation to pastoral suggests, not so much nostalgia as the modern artist’s inextricable entanglement with sociality.

 

 

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CY TWOMBLY, ORPHEUS, 1975, COLLAGE: OIL PAINT, COLOR PENCIL, SCOTCH TAPE ON PAPER, 55 1⁄2″ × 39 3⁄8″. © CY TWOMBLY FOUNDATION. COURTESY ARCHIVES FONDAZIONE NICOLA DEL ROSCIO. PHOTO: MIMMO CAPONE

Twombly’s recurrent preoccupation with Rilke’s Orpheus sonnets emerges in numerous paintings, drawings, and sculptures. His collage Orpheus (1975) quotes from Rilke’s “Be in advance of all parting” (“be a ringing glass that shivers even as it rings”), beneath a repeated broken line that seems to record a break in the fabric of life. Here, an oblique line has its start in the faint pink of erotic passion. Spare and epitaphic, the broken ascent echoes Rilke’s emphasis on “the realm of decline” inhabited by the poet.

This article originally appeared in the Paris Review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arturo Pacheco Lugo : A Statement of Presence


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“In the beginning of painting is a struggling soul,

thus painting is a phenomenon of the soul.

The work must redeem a passionate soul.

In a poetic image, the soul states its presence.”

G. Bachelard.

 

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To look at a painting by Lugo is like sifting through an archeological dig, moving through layer upon layer of earth.  Barely recognizable forms emerge into a conscious gestalt where meanings galvanize through the viewer’s own personal references and connections.

Jan Kirstein

 

 

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Arturo Pacheco Lugo was born in the city of Puebla, Mexico on November 12, 1961.

He studied fine arts in the workshops of painters Jose Luis Hernandez and Sando Berger during the early years of his formation as an artist.

 

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Lugo uses experimental techniques, materials and creative processes and aesthetic applications and has had numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout his artistic life.  His works are sought after by collectors worldwide.

 

 

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Hyunmee Lee


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Hyunmee Lee’s paintings deliver a punch and a whisper, all within a complete sentence of harmony and stabilization.  Space and form balance in a delicate dialogue of opposites, yet the connections feel completely inevitable and preordained, as though this image is, will be, and has always been just so as you see it, indelibly existing forever and now, simultaneously.

Jan Kirstein

 

 

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ARTIST STATEMENT
My art practice crosses three continents over two decades. The works consider the images and ideas that mark my journey into the spiritual and cultural dimensions of painting as a creative activity. During a period when I have carried adventurous journeys across several different social and geographic divides, I began to search deeper for an understanding of who I am, and where I am. My paintings started to explore the idea of self as the most fundamental element of human nature; I tried to seek my identity as I examined human nature.

 

 

 

 

 

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In 1961 Hyunmee Lee was born in Seoul Korea, where she grew up practicing Western Modern art with experience in Eastern painting and calligraphy. Her art practice crosses three continents over two decades.

1985 Lee graduated Hong-Ik University majoring in painting. At the end of that year, she moved to Australia. She stayed there for six years and achieved two post graduate degrees. 1989 she exhibited in her first commercial gallery, Bonython-Meodemore Gallery, Sydney. At the same time, her work was exposed through a contemporary art book (Art Four).

1991 Hyunmee Lee earned a Master of Arts in Visual Arts (MFA) at the Sydney College of Arts, University of Sydney and returned to Korea. She lived in Korea for seven years. There she taught in Hong-Ik University as a lecturer and exhibited in solo shows in major art galleries and art fairs in Seoul.

1997 Lee came to Utah, U.S.A. where she continuously taught in universities and built up her art career. 2001 She became a faculty member of Utah Valley University. 2002 Lee had her first solo show in America, called Mountain Armatures, at the Woodbury Art Museum in Orem, Utah. 2006 She showed her large scale work in the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Intimacy Without Restraint. 2008 After achieving tenure, she retired from teaching and more fully concentrated on her art. She is currently working with U.S.A galleries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Raven Collage – Mixed Media Collage —


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Originally posted on M.E. Ologeanu – artworks: buy art on ebay The Raven Collage – Mixed Media Collage

via The Raven Collage – Mixed Media Collage — KIRSTEINFINEART

 

Robert Ronnow  

Under Mummy Mountain

Aspen, ponderosa pine, blue spruce
pink glacier-cut rock, scree, ravens
gray jay, peregrine falcon, hawk.

We climb to 11,000 feet in three days,
camp at Lawn Lake for three days. Alpine
tundra. Elk, bighorn sheep, marmot.

Tileston Meadows, ticks in grass,
rock face of Mummy Mountain.
Binoculars show pink cracks in gray rock.

Stoke gas stoves, play cards.
Boil water, set up tarps, lay out
sleeping bags, hang bear bag.

Watch crescent moon slice into
Fairchild Mountain. Moonlight
makes a mosque of the rocks.

Yellow aspen splash in dark green
spruce and pine. Gullies where streams
slash during spring snowmelt.

One rock, feather or flower worth
more than money. Need no wallet,
keys. Just clothes for fur.

All day climb toward saddle to see
what’s on other side. One hawk floating
among bare peaks and over valleys.

Wind at 13,000 feet
turns to sleet. Turn back from peak,
take boulders two at a time down.

Winter moves into mountains.
Then we fly from Denver to New York
where it’s still summer.