17 Truly Stunning Tarot Decks to Buy for Your New Age-y Friends — StyleCaster


byLINDSEY LANQUIST

Over the last few years, we’ve experienced an aesthetic—and perhaps even spiritual—shift toward embracing New Age-y wears. Crystals have pervaded our physical spaces. Horoscopes have informed our judgments. Tarot decks have commanded our attention. My connection to this realm is largely stylistic; I’m skeptical of rocks with powers, but I’d be lying if I said they…

17 Truly Stunning Tarot Decks to Buy for Your New Age-y Friends — StyleCaster

“Imagination: The Creative Force of Life”


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Imagination: The Spirit of Sophia held “ The Creative Force of Life” at the Women’s Foundation’s Hopscotch House in Prospect, Kentucky today, Earth Day, April 22. Artist Joan Zehnder was our guide today as we wrote and made art about what we each individually have to offer the world. We then combined our writing and art in groups to create new worlds. What a meaningful, enriching, empowering and exhilarating experience. And what fun too! Perfect for a rainy Earth Day…..

 

 

Top left: Imagination participant Andria Creighton  contemplates her group’s creation. Top right: Going for a three-d effect here in this Imagination group effort. Bottom: Some thoughts of a participant.  2nd right:  Director and founder of Spirit of Sophia Dana Sue Walker writing and reflecting on her group’s New World Imagination group art.

 

 

Top left:  This is the lovely sitting room in the Hopscotch house provided by the Woman’s Foundation of Louisville, founded by Sally Bingham for the enrichment, advancement and enlightenment of women throughout the country. Top right: Another group contemplates their group creation. Bottom right: No matter which direction you look at it, this piece’s rich organic structure enhances the many gifts of all the women in this group.

 

Another Imagination group’s creative effort.

The entire Imagination experience was a high point of the week and a perfect way to celebrate Earth  Day, all enthusiastic participant agreed.

Collector’s Choice: Marc Chagall


 

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Marc Chagall (French, born Russia – present-day Belarus; 1887-1985): Carmen, 1966. Lithograph. Image size: 39-1/2 x 25-11/16 inches (100.5 x 65.3 cm). Created in 1966 from a maquette for Chagall’s “Triumph of Music,” a series of 3 large-scale decorations created for the Metropolitan Opera House in New York (Carmen, The Magic Flute, Romeo and Juliet). © Marc Chagall.

‘Chagall created this piece for the opera “Carmen” by George Bizet upon its opening at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. The print is a small detail from a preliminary painting of Chagall’s much larger “The Triumph of Music”, which now hangs at the Metropolitan Opera.’

“Chagall: Midsummer Night’s Dreams”
Through January 8, 2017
Carrières de Lumières, Les Baux de Provence, France
http://bit.ly/2heyQmy

Exhibition:
“Winter Exhibition 2016”
Until February 15, 2017
Gilden’s Art Gallery, London

Thanks to:  #IRequireArt @irequireart #art

 

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Born Moishe Shagal
6 July 1887 (N.S.)
Liozna, near Vitebsk, Russian Empire (present-day Belarus)
Died 28 March 1985 (aged 97)
Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France
Nationality Russian, later French
Known for Painting stained glass
Movement :  Cubism Expressionism

 
Marc Zakharovich Chagall (/ʃəˈɡɑːl/ shə-gahl,  6 July [O.S. 24 June] 1887 – 28 March 1985) was a Russian-French artist. An early modernist, he was associated with several major artistic styles and created works in virtually every artistic format, including painting, book illustrations, stained glass, stage sets, ceramic, tapestries and fine art prints.

Art critic Robert Hughes referred to Chagall as “the quintessential Jewish artist of the twentieth century” (though Chagall saw his work as “not the dream of one people but of all humanity”). According to art historian Michael J. Lewis, Chagall was considered to be “the last survivor of the first generation of European modernists”. For decades, he “had also been respected as the world’s preeminent Jewish artist”. Using the medium of stained glass, he produced windows for the cathedrals of Reims and Metz, windows for the UN, and the Jerusalem Windows in Israel. He also did large-scale paintings, including part of the ceiling of the Paris Opéra.

Before World War I, he traveled between St. Petersburg, Paris, and Berlin. During this period he created his own mixture and style of modern art based on his idea of Eastern European Jewish folk culture. He spent the wartime years in Soviet Belarus, becoming one of the country’s most distinguished artists and a member of the modernist avant-garde, founding the Vitebsk Arts College before leaving again for Paris in 1922.

He had two basic reputations, writes Lewis: as a pioneer of modernism and as a major Jewish artist. He experienced modernism’s “golden age” in Paris, where “he synthesized the art forms of Cubism, Symbolism, and Fauvism, and the influence of Fauvism gave rise to Surrealism.”  Yet throughout these phases of his style “he remained most emphatically a Jewish artist, whose work was one long dreamy reverie of life in his native village of Vitebsk.”

“When Matisse dies,” Pablo Picasso remarked in the 1950s, “Chagall will be the only painter left who understands what colour really is.”

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Marc Chagall

 

 

Collector’s Choice: Red!


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Mark Rothko : Red Abstracts

Thanks to Azurebumble

Above:  Mark Rothko. Orange, Red, Orange. Oil on paper.

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Mark Rothko. Untitled. Oil on canvas.

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Mark Rothko. Untitled. Oil on canvas.

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Mark Rothko.  Oil on canvas.

One of the preeminent artists of his generation, Mark Rothko is closely identified with the New York School, a circle of painters that emerged during the 1940s as a new collective voice in American art. During a career that spanned five decades, he created a new and impassioned form of abstract painting. Rothko’s work is characterized by rigorous attention to formal elements such as color, shape, balance, depth, composition, and scale; yet, he refused to consider his paintings solely in these terms. He explained:

“It is a widely accepted notion among painters that it does not matter what one paints as long as it is well painted. This is the essence of academicism. There is no such thing as good painting about nothing.”

 

 

More Red Paintings

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Henri Matisse:  “The Desert:  Harmony in Red, 180 x 221 cm, 1908

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More Red Art

This set of images includes art from living artists. All of these artists have been featured on Kirsteinfinefineart. These artists include Kurt Nimmo, Rick Bennett, and Janis Kirstein.

 

Click on  thumbnails to enlarge.

Red is a color I love, but ordinarily for me, a little red goes a long way. However, all of the paintings on this series use a proportional predominance of red. Red is an assertive color that comes forward toward the viewer. It is a warm color, an assertive color, and even can be an aggressive color. Red is associated with fire, passion, heat, energy, blood, life force, and is a high impact color. Red is said to make people hungry, thus the predominance of red in fast food decor: McDonald’s, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Rally’s for examples.

Hope this blog didn’t make you too hungry!

 

Jan Kirstein

Kirsteinfineart

 

To see more of my Red Collage Series, click here and go to November Collages 2016 Gallery.