True Inspiration: Helen Frankenthaler


 

To honor and support the Women’s March in Washington D.C. this week, I am would like to give tribute to some of my fav painters who have inspired me for a lifetime. Today it’s Helen Frankenthaler.

 

 

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Helen Frankenthaler, Europa, 1957, Oil on unsized, unprimed canvas, 70 x 54 1/2 x 2 inches (177.8 x 138.43 x 5.08 cm) © 2016 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Abstract Expressionism
Royal Academy of Arts
September 24, 2016 – January 2, 2017
This long-awaited exhibition reveals the full breadth of a movement that will forever be associated with the boundless creative energy of 1950s New York.

Traveling to:
Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Spain
February 03, 2017 – June 04, 2017

 

Hartung and Lyrical Painters
Fonds Hélène & Édouard Leclerc pour la Culture, Landerneau, France
December 11, 2016 – April 17, 2017
The exhibition positions the work of Hans Hartung with artists of the 1950’s such as Georges Mathieu, Gérard Schneider, Hantaï, and international artists from subsequent decades, including Helen Frankenthaler.

 

Women of Abstract Expressionism
The Mint Museum, Charlotte, NC
October 22, 2016 – January 22, 2017
The groundbreaking exhibition Women of Abstract Expressionism celebrates the often unknown female artists of this mid-twentieth century art movement.

Traveling to:
Palm Springs Art Museum, CA
February 18, 2017 – May 28, 2017

Originated:
Denver Art Museum, CO
June 12 – September 25, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

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A Little Plug for my Justice Collection by Janis Kirstein. To see more click here.

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Collector’s Choice: Helen Frankenthaler


“Jacob’s Ladder” by Helen Frankenthaler

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Although this painting shares a name with the biblical tale of Jacob’s dreamed ascent toward heaven, and also with an ancient Egyptian toy, Frankenthaler insisted this work had no illustrational intention: “The picture developed (bit by bit while I was working on it) into shapes symbolic of an exuberant figure and ladder, therefore Jacob’s Ladder.

Working in New York in the 1950s, Frankenthaler painted large-scale unprimed canvases on the floor to explore new ways of handling distinctively thinned paint. The artist said she borrowed from Jackson Pollock her “concern with line, fluid line, calligraphy, and … experiments with line not as line but as shape.”

 

Click on thumbnails to enlarge

Helen Frankenthaler was an American abstract expressionist painter. She was a major contributor to the history of postwar American painting. Wikipedia
Died: December 27, 2011, Darien, CT
Spouse: Stephen M. DuBrul Jr. (m. 1994–2011), Robert Motherwell (m. 1958–1971)
Periods: Lyrical abstraction, Post-painterly abstraction, Color Field, Modern art, Abstract expressionism