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MoonArk will be a Philosophical Mini-Museum, Left on the Moon for Future Explorers to Discover


“I am so grateful to have pieces of my Nano Image based art included in the MoonArk!”–Fine Artist Jan Kirstein

To See this Story on CNN go HERE.

(CNN) – Earth is giving a gift to the moon that will land on the lunar surface next year.

The nine-ounce MoonArk — a tiny time capsule-esque artifact of humanity — will be attached to a small lunar rover. This is in the hopes that one day it may be picked up by lunar explorers — hundreds or thousands of years in the future.

The MoonArk was designed to capture humanity’s view of Earth, the moon, the space between the two, and the greater universe. Fittingly, these complex narratives are shared through various types of art — not unlike the way ancient humans left their mark on Earth for us to understand the past.

It’s not a traditional time capsule because it’s not organized chronologically and doesn’t encapsulate everything a future human or other species would need to know. That would be impossible. But the MoonArk team has achieved their own kind of impossible feat over the course of 10 long, determined years. They have turned a vision into a reality that will sit on lunar soil.

MoonArk will hitch a ride with with a new lunar rover set to launch next year. Originally known as the Moon Arts Project, MoonArk was designed in response to the 2007 Google Lunar XPRIZE competition. The competition and its $30 million prize expired in 2018 when teams around the globe failed to land a robotic spacecraft on the moon.

But the Andy lunar rover — developed by William “Red” Whittaker, a Carnegie Mellon University professor and director of the Field Robotics Center — is go for launch in 2021. The tiny rover will be one of the first American robots to explore the moon’s surface and transmit video back to Earth.

Astrobotic’s Peregrine lander will deliver the rover to the near side of the moon, landing by the Lake of Death. This region contains a large scientifically intriguing pit that the rover can image. Whittaker co-founded Astrobotics, a Carnegie Mellon spin-off company that plans to send payloads to the moon and eventually elsewhere.

Astrobotic’s Peregrine lander will deliver the rover to the near side of the moon, landing by the Lake of Death. This region contains a large scientifically intriguing pit that the rover can image. Whittaker co-founded Astrobotics, a Carnegie Mellon spin-off company that plans to send payloads to the moon and eventually elsewhere.

The rover will drive at a few centimeters per second and its major capabilities include autonomously choosing where to go, taking pictures, calling home and staying out of trouble, Whittaker said.

Andy and the MoonArk will part ways after the rover releases its cultural payload and leaves it behind to explore the Lake of Death. For MoonArk, it’s just the beginning.

“It is about the size of a shoebox with four wheels, and it is ultra lightweight, with a camera in forward and rear,” Whittaker said. “MoonArk is attached underneath the deck of the lander, like a skirt that protrudes from the body. Our approach is to attach it underneath that lander deck and when the time comes to release it and have it float to the ground. That’s never been done before.

Inside the ark

Lowry Burgess, NASA space artist and professor emeritus at the Carnegie Mellon University School of Art, came up with the original concept for MoonArk.

Burgess, along with Carnegie Mellon faculty members Mark Baskinger, Matt Zywica, Dylan Vitone and James Madison University professor Mark Rooker, have been on a journey together ever since. They’re not just creators of the MoonArk, but caregivers as well.

Initially driven by determining factors like weight, scale and cost, the project took on a greater purpose.

“We had a larger narrative in mind,” said Baskinger, project co-lead and associate professor at CMU’s School of Design. “We thought about ‘What does it mean to be human?’ ‘What are the elements and dimensions of being human?’ ‘And how does the moon factor into that?’ “

The fundamentals of living on Earth and seeing space through human eyes are there, arranged in a stack of small chambers representing Earth, the moon and various regions of space.

They decided on four chambers, starting with Earth at the bottom, followed by the metasphere where our communications satellites exist, then the moon chamber and finally, the ether chamber exploring the “more existential and abstract conceptions of the universe beyond what we know.”

The team wanted to create a literal context for humanity, showcasing humans as they are today on Earth, how the moon has acted as our muse for art and the ether above it all, causing us to ponder where we are in the grand scheme of things.

The chambers are each only about two inches in both height and diameter. But each one contains a nanoscale world within, including hundreds of examples of poetry, music, sounds, drawing, symbols, dance, art, artifacts and tiny samples.

Each chamber is the result of collaborating with a team of 60 people and more than 250 artists, scientists, designers and educators.

The inventory contained within is long and varied, a mix of concrete and abstract.

The team wanted to create a literal context for humanity, showcasing humans as they are today on Earth, how the moon has acted as our muse for art and the ether above it all, causing us to ponder where we are in the grand scheme of things.

The chambers are each only about two inches in both height and diameter. But each one contains a nanoscale world within, including hundreds of examples of poetry, music, sounds, drawing, symbols, dance, art, artifacts and tiny samples.

Each chamber is the result of collaborating with a team of 60 people and more than 250 artists, scientists, designers and educators.The inventory contained within is long and varied, a mix of concrete and abstract.Mesmerizing cosmic artworks honor history’s unsung female astronomers

Songs are laser-etched on disks alongside perfume to evoke the idea of moving through a city and catching fragments of music. There are impossibly tiny samples of plankton, ocean water, flower pollen and resin. Multiple languages and translations share slices of the varied cultures found across Earth.

There’s a stunning visual of the FOXP2 genome structure, the gene that allows songbirds to make songs and humans to put words in order, said Dylan Vitone, professor of photography at CMU. The “out of Africa” concept explaining the spread of humanity is given a modern update, showing the light population and density over Egypt. It represents the growth of light and electrification to show the spread of humanity from the fertile crescent

Smartphone messages sent between Vitone and his wife over the course of five years reveal how humans express affection through images.In the moon chamber, there are artistic tributes: the representation of a ballet composed in honor of the moon, 108 poems to the moon across the years and 9,000 drawings people wanted to send to the moon.

When Baskinger found out one of his friends was going to Hawaii, he asked him to bring back a sandwich bag of sand. For two weeks, he sifted through the sand under a microscope, picking out shells and organism structures. They reflect the various microscosms on Earth in contrast to the human scale.

One ring contains infinities, combinations of things that are represented in one tiny item. Burgess put together the “metal of metals” by taking all of the metals from the periodic table, melting them down and fusing them together.

Each chamber includes murals representative of the theme, designed to degrade over time on the moon’s harsh surface and reveal other details. The ether chamber ends with a musical score and an image of the Andromeda galaxy, which our galaxy will collide with in about four billion years.

The MoonArk wasn’t designed to capture the doomsday aspect of humanity ending, however. You won’t find any seed catalogs or an upload of Wikipedia entries.

It’s not reflective of politics or current affairs. Instead, like a miniature museum, MoonArk was designed to be timeless and open to interpretation.

“The world is divisive,” Baskinger said. “This cuts through all of that artifice and touches on fundamental and core aspects of humanity. What does it mean to be a human in this experience that we can look at an object and begin to see a reflection of ourselves in, and not one that aligns with any particular mold or model? It’s a a very raw mirror. It’s not our voice we’re trying to project, but the result of an organic process of cooperation and collaboration with people in 18 countries.”

Creating a gift for to the future

The MoonArk itself is a testament to technology and design, pushing the limits of what’s possible now to create an object for the future.

Platinum-engraved sapphire disks, nano sculptures, millimeter-sized silicon chips and metal murals are enclosed in an elaborate exoskeleton.”It’s a cutting-edge object in so many ways, like bleeding-edge technology,” Zywica said. “It involved 3D printing and the machining of wafer-thin sapphire disks that really pushed our capacity.”

Rooker, a metalsmith professor, was in charge of the final assembly. He controlled the process of engraving the various disks down to the nanometer.

“He worked tirelessly to make this a beautiful object tipped in diamonds and gold,” Vitone said. “It has the elegance of a Faberge egg.

So we can leave behind a gift that’s functional and beautiful.”The object is both lightweight and strong, built to last on the moon.

There’s a twin copy of the MoonArk that will remain on Earth, touring as an exhibit so people can interact with it.

This is a Nano Based Image created by Fine Artist Janis Kirstein. Images like these by her will be included in the Moon Ark. Why don’t you plan a trip to go see?

Commission a Painting for Your Living Space


You won’t believe how your space can come alive with original paintings and prints. Sometimes it helps to see a piece on the wall. Here are a few breathtaking shots of original paintings in specific spaces. Take a look around.
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The canvas in the front on the right is an acrylic painting on stretched canvas by Jan Kirstein. “Shifting Energy Fields” is 4′ x 5.’ The painting in the adjacent room is also by Jan Kirstein and is a collage on paper.

 

“Kaboom” giclee print on archival paper or stretched canvas. To see more about this piece go here.







This is a smaller piece of art by Jan Kirstein enlarged into a giclee print on stretched canvas. Maybe you have a special place you would like to bring to life: your bedroom, your living room or dining room. There is nothing like a painting to breath joy and life into a living or office space. If you would like to find out more about painting commissions, if you have any questions about how to get started, feel free to email me, the artist, Jan Kirstein here.

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Giclee print on stretched canvas.

Putting Presentation Questions to All Artists


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Every artist has a prefered method of showing their work, either to a gallery, or to the public in general. In this issue, I am asking you to share your experiences and opinions on these matters with me so I can share on this blog for everyone.

I have asked you readers for your experiences before, on matters involving presenting your art, and as a result, we have received all kinds of wonderful advice from a large variety of artists. So today, I want to put some questions to you regarding presenting your art work and see if you can send me some of your experiences or advice. I will them publish the responses I get.  You can post here under comments, or you can email me here.  

So one basic question is:

How do you present your work in a portfolio when you are approaching a gallery for the first time?

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If you use three dimensional format, and show actual works, do you show actual pieces if they are small, and in what kind of presentation? For larger pieces, do you show photographs?

Do you use a portfolio for paper pieces? Or do you bring framed works and canvas works after the first meeting and interest is shown?

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Do you have a go-to frame that you prefer for presenting your work? Please elaborate and share brand and retail mega deals if you know any!

If you use digital format do you bring an IPad? Or have an online website that you get them to see?

Please send me your thoughts, ideas and experiences! I will compile the data all of you send me and share it a soon to follow edition of this blog.

 

Thanks so much for sharing your ideas, knowledge and expertise!

 

Jan Kirstein

 

Advertisement for Kirsteinfineart. Giclee Prints, on 24″ x 36″ stretched canvas, Limited Time Offer: Click Here.

A Week’s Work (Or Play, I Should Say)


I have been talking with people a little bit about showing my work in a variety of possible venues. One woman I spoke with said, “Well to show in a gallery you have to have more than a couple of pieces.”

She obviously doesn’t know me. (Yet.) Here is this week’s work! 

Photographing the Work.

It is much harder to photograph this stuff than to paint it. I have discovered that my cell phone takes better photos than my Nikon 35 milimeter SLR Digital camera. And my cell phone is not even high end. It’s a smart phone but rather cheesy, I thought.

The photos below are taken by my cell phone.

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Mixed media collage by Jan Kirstein. 11″ x 14.” Summer, 2019.

But the cell phone captures higher detail, better color, and is higher resolution. I have an app on my phone I use called “Camera.” How creative. Anyway, it apparently bumps up the quality quite a bit from my bare smartphone camera, which is really pretty close in quality. My cell phone is an LG Cricket. (I go cheap whenever I can. )

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Mixed media collage by Jan Kirstein. 11″ x 14.” 2019.
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Mixed media collage by Jan Kirstein. 11″ x 14.” 2019.
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Mixed media collage by Jan Kirstein. 11″ x 14.” 2019.
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Memories from Childhood


62 years ago, my mother and I. Ferncreek, KY.

Today, by coincidence, I was looking in my studio for a particular piece of Japanese rice paper that I had misplaced, when I came across this little doll-like figure I had made when I was two years old. My 93 year old mother had saved this little doll for me and gave it to me one of the last times I saw her.

Also coincidentally, I am going to see her again at the end of this week, so I decided to include the little doll in one of my current collages.

“Hi Five” by J. Kirstein. 14″ x 11.” Mixed media. June 2019. Before the final touch of the “Hi 5.”
“Hi 5” finished piece by Jan Kirstein.

I added a “Hi 5” on the drawn part of the collage. I also added a variety of quick marks reminding me of what it felt like to be a kid again. I work with childhood memories from time to time in my work, as it takes me back to my creative origins and original unbiased urges, unrestrained by propriety and judgemental restraint.

Ironically enough, though the title suggests the hand-slapping connection of one person’s celebratory smack of another’s hand, this little creature appears to have no hands, or arms, for that matter.

I can distinctly remember when it occurred to me at age 3 that people’s arms grow out of their torsos, not their heads. I could not believe my vast ignorance at thinking this preposterous error previously. I remember having to readjust my entire paradigm of my understanding of human anatomy to be able to proceed forward from that day on.

Apparently I had not yet had this epiphany when I made this doll. I think my mother must have surely helped me with some of the details on it, like sewing on the buttons for eyes, or maybe demarcating the facial features with a few simple lines. But she claims it was “all Me.” She said she saved it because she thought it showed unusual ability for such a small child.

Thank you Mother for your observation and awareness.

Now I have the opportunity to love and learn some things from my two year old self! I only hope I can access my true fire and intuition as well as I did as a two year old child.

After all, Picasso did say: “Children are the best artists.”

Collages and writing by Jan Kirstein

I Did a REALLY Ugly Painting Today!


Nancy Hillis would be proud of me. I created an enormously ugly painting today and IT WAS SO FUN!! Boy was I on a roll! First I started off and it looked pretty nice, then I kept “futzing” with it. Finally I just let loose and flew into a foaming at the mouth painting frenzy, keeping in mind all the virtues of painting “the Ugly Painting” which she stipulates so articulately in her new book: “The Artist’s Journey.”

The more I painted, the uglier it got. Finally I was just making moves in the paint completely removed from any preconceived notions.

Nancy Hillis would be proud. Why don’t you tell me the story of your ugliest painting? Maybe you have made one uglier than mine and would like to tell me about it!

Quotes from Nancy about the “ugly” painting.:

She says “Ugly” paintings threaten you because they’re unfamiliar and unruly, and emerge unbidden without your consent. They subvert your need for control.”


“Your “ugly” paintings are vitally important. In fact, these paintings are probably more important by several orders of magnitude than the work you like and value.”


“The cost of dismissing your rejected, “ugly” paintings is you risk missing discovering something until now invisible in you trying to become visible.”


“Just as the chrysalis is the nascent form of the butterfly, the “ugly” painting is the raw essence of new, experimental work.”

“Cultivating an attitude of experimentation is one of the most important and potent things you
can do to develop and evolve your art,” says Nancy Hillis.

Going Large: Collage on Canvas


In my art studio, space is limited, and there is just barely room for this latest 4 foot by 8 foot canvas. I love working in large scale. I won’t give it up for anything, though I still find making small 14″ x 11″ collages on paper and unstretched canvas a way to grow as a painter daily by leaps and bounds.

Jan Kirstein

“The Fall of Western Civilization,” by Jan Kirstein. 4′ x 8.’ Mixed media on canvas. 2019

“The Fall of Western Civilization” Details

Click on above images to enlarge.

Detail: “The Fall of Western Civilization.”

The title of this work comes from the general shift of virtually everything I see around me on every level, in government, both Federal and State, in institutions, in relationships, in land, in all aspects of our culture, in all aspects of life. Though with the changes comes movement and flexibility with new connections occurring at a most rapid pace.

Jan Kirstein